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Design for round revolving bookcase?

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Forum topic by Ryan Sandler posted 02-27-2017 01:13 AM 875 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ryan Sandler

14 posts in 293 days


02-27-2017 01:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw joining

Last week I successfully made a circle cutting jig for my bandsaw, and now I’ve taken it into my head to try to build a round revolving bookcase. I found a handful of pictures of this type of piece through google searches, and one design using MDF. I was hoping you fine folks could suggest design principles, joints to use etc.

For background, I’m a weekend hobbyist woodworker—my goal is to learn new techniques or practice one’s I know, and have fun doing it, rather than necessarily to have the end product (though my household could use another bookcase). So I’d like to see if I can build this just with joinery, rather than fasteners, and out of solid wood, rather than MDF or ply. Tool-wise, I’ve got a bandsaw, a decent table saw and router. No planer or jointer, though I’m likely going to acquire the former in the near future.

Here’s a link to the one plan I found: Link . The gist is that you have boxes supporting each layer of round shelves, plus additional boxes to divide the space.

Here’s a picture of another variety that comes up on google image search
It appears that the plus-shaped dividers support the round shelves (this particular specimen also seems to have two segments rotating separately).

Specific questions:
Any thoughts on the box-centric vs. divider-centric design?
Is there a sensible way to incorporate a center post like I’ve seen in the square revolving bookcases I’ve seen?
For the rounds, can I get away with edge-gluing boards into a panel, or will that not have enough stability?
What joints would make sense to attach the rounds to whatever supports them?


12 replies so far

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#1 posted 02-27-2017 01:55 AM

I like the divider style. The box style looks like it was designed by a non woodworker.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Lazyman

1506 posts in 1226 days


#2 posted 02-27-2017 03:37 AM

+1 for the divider centric design. I think you are going to need some joinery to join the dividers and the rounds such as a dado for example. Simply gluing end grain to the face of the rounds without fasteners won’t work.

Another option would be to cut tenons on the vertical that fit in mortises on the rounds.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#3 posted 02-27-2017 05:32 AM

Cut your dadoes while the piece is square and where they cross, establish a pivot point and cut your circle. Simple really. Half lapping the dividers would be best but tricky considering the height.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Ryan Sandler

14 posts in 293 days


#4 posted 02-28-2017 02:03 AM

Thanks, this is helpful. Any thoughts on the sanity of making the rounds out of edge-gluing panels?

Incidentally, on the subject of mortise & tenons, there’s this one intriguing diagram that shows up on google image search (I can’t get the image to load separate from the search or I’d link to it), that appears to show finger joints on the middle of the dividers extending through a slot in the round layer to lock into the fingers of the dividers on the layer below. Probably more difficult than is worth the effort…


Cut your dadoes while the piece is square and where they cross, establish a pivot point and cut your circle. Simple really. Half lapping the dividers would be best but tricky considering the height.

- Rick M


Novice question: why would half-lapping the dividers be particularly difficult with wider boards?

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#5 posted 02-28-2017 06:34 AM

You could cut the lap joints with the board flat on a router table and square off the corners with a chisel.

Glued up panel would be fine

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 02-28-2017 02:06 PM

If you dado the top and bottom the dividers are going to be locked in. You can run one full length divider then dado the 2 side pieces into it.
I would do a stop dado on the top and bottom about 1/2” from the edge (then square it off with a chisel) so that your dado doesn’t run through the face edge.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#7 posted 02-28-2017 06:07 PM

A stopped dado is assumed since the dividers don’t run to the edge. Jbays suggestion of doing the dividers in 3 pieces will probably be easier. I thought of it but really like the interlocking half laps (is there another name for them when they are vertical) but I am prone to overcomplicating things.

It’s a nice little bookcase actually, the more I look at it. Wish I had an excuse to build one.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Ryan Sandler

14 posts in 293 days


#8 posted 02-28-2017 07:07 PM

Thanks to you both. I might experiment with some cheap pine or plywood to figure out how to connect the dividers. I also kinda like the idea of the half laps (maybe cut on the bandsaw even)? But 3-pieces may make more sense.

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Lazyman

1506 posts in 1226 days


#9 posted 02-28-2017 11:14 PM

If you have a band saw, that is an easy way the cut the slots for the half laps for the dividers. You
may need to finish with coping saw or clean up with chisel and/or rasp. You also can do it on a table saw. Just note that you cannot cut all the way to the end because the circular blade ends at a different place at top vs. the bottom face. Again you can finish the slot with coping saw, chisel and rasp. And you can always make these cuts with a hand saw.

Finally, if you are going edge glue your boards anyway, you can cut the slots beforehand and just join the halves where there is no slot. After typing all of the above, that’s probably what I would do/

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Ryan Sandler

14 posts in 293 days


#10 posted 03-05-2017 04:39 PM

Plans!...though I’m not sure the exercise of making them up in Sketchup was particularly helpful in this case. Need to make a trip to the hardwood store in the next couple weeks, and figure out what kind of wood I want to use for this…oak? maple? ash? Decisions, decisions…

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Lazyman

1506 posts in 1226 days


#11 posted 03-05-2017 05:11 PM

Are you going to put the half rounds (2 quarter rounds) or something similar on the 2 sides of each level like the original picture? I think you will want those to act as book ends so that the books don’t fall off as you turn it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Ryan Sandler

14 posts in 293 days


#12 posted 03-05-2017 05:29 PM

Yeah, I’m planning on that; I did a rough calculation that the waste from the corners of the panels for the shelf rounds should be big enough for a 4-5” radius quarter circle, which seemed like a pretty good size. Figure I’ll drill a pivot point in the very corner of the panels and cut it on the circle jig. Just couldn’t quite be bothered to mock it up in Sketchup.

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