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Chisel Lathe Set - Essencial?? (help)

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Forum topic by heldercruz100 posted 02-26-2017 09:19 PM 449 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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heldercruz100

35 posts in 316 days


02-26-2017 09:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chisel lathe turning carving miling help

Last week I built a simple drill powered wood lathe, its good enough to work with small pieces of wood. But now I dont know what tools should I use.. I have some simple chisels that i use for joinering, is it ok that I use them?? Also I usualy see other woodworkers using diferent kinds of chisels, some with a u shape.. Do you think its something that can be made with metal scraps or should I buy one of those expensive chisel lathe sets??
Also let me know what tools you use and the ones that are essencial

-- Helder Cruz


7 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1565 days


#1 posted 02-27-2017 12:40 AM

For the set up you made, if a piece of metal can cut, I’m sure you don’t need anything fancier than a wood chisel or a screwdriver sharpened enough to cut. If you decide you would pursue woodturning, then get yourself a real lathe and the necessary tools.
Anyone on this site can be of more help than me….... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Iwoodtryharder

5 posts in 295 days


#2 posted 02-27-2017 03:51 AM

I started woodturning last year. My advice is to check out youtube videos on getting started in woodturning. One thing you will need is speed control at both slow and significantly faster speeds. Pens, bottle stoppers, seam rippers, small tool handle are all small things to start with.

I doubt that your drill-based lathe is going to cut it. Lathe chisels (typically called “gouges” ) have very different shapes from conventional carving chisels. Again, there are many very good instructional videos regarding these tools on Youtube. Used lathes are often available on Craigslist or ebay. Harbor Freight Tools was clearance selling a 1/3hp 8X12 lathe in the SF Bay Area for less than $80. It looks identical to a Jet model listed in a recent Woodcraft catalog for more than $300.

I started the wood shop at a local senior center (yeah, I know, your picture tells me you don’t want to wait that long), but many places have shop access via adult ed or vocational ed. Google up your local woodturners association and ask for help.

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1565 days


#3 posted 02-27-2017 03:21 PM

I know that in the videos I posted, the camera was not positioned correctly. Sorry about that, but now, with these pictures, the camera has been re positioned and the pictures are a bit better. In this first picture, I’ve just removed the tenon down to the nub, and have set up my Tail Stock Steady to remove the nub. The form is mounted to a rim chuck, which is mounted onto my Chuck Plate, which isn’t visible.

The nub has been turned into a small finial rather than remove it completely. I do this only because I can, and it’s a touch not normally seen in 98% of other turnings with pedestals.

This image shows a dowel that I used to bridge a crack that could have been a problem. The dowel is made from the same piece of wood that the form is made of, which is Palo Verde local to the Sonoran Desert. Pretty neat effect that looks kinda like cat eyes.

This image is of another form with a finial in the pedestal. Mesquite lidded box.

This last image shows the 2 forms I was working on. No finish applied on either form. The larger is a little over 5”od and 6” tall at the top of the knob. The smaller form is 3 1/2” OD and 5 3/4” tall.
......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1565 days


#4 posted 02-27-2017 03:31 PM

I don’t know how this happened in the above comment and I can’t figure out how to remove it from this topic. Anyone that can help, please do and let me know how it’s done. Thanks…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1775 posts in 483 days


#5 posted 02-27-2017 04:03 PM



I don t know how this happened in the above comment and I can t figure out how to remove it from this topic. Anyone that can help, please do and let me know how it s done. Thanks…... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

Jerry … perhaps if you flag the comment and send Cricket a PM she can help!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Ron Aylor

1775 posts in 483 days


#6 posted 02-27-2017 05:05 PM

Helder – I use chisels, scrapers, sandpaper, etc. with my lathe but, it is of spring pole variety. I would think you would be find using the same with your set-up. Just go for it and see!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

459 posts in 1137 days


#7 posted 02-27-2017 07:12 PM

I use conventional tools most all the time but….
I did make a couple of carbide tip tools. You would need 1/2” sq bar about 9-12” ($6); a tap and appropriate drill bit for the screws ($6), some wood for a handle.
Here is one place lots of folks buy from and the carbide bits are pretty reasonable and they should have the proper screws to seat correctly.
http://azcarbide.com/product-category/square/

If I were to suggest a minimum convential set it may be this which is close to full size. (Three piece)
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2017/main/164?p=164

If you have extra bench chisels they can be reground for a skew, bedan, or scraper. The problem is the short handle where you really do not have the leverage needed for most turning.

If you make your own you will need a parting tool. Lots of folks make them from such as used edger blades, planer blades, or even kitchen knifes (with the sharp edge flattened).

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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