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Forum topic by CaptainSkully posted 02-25-2017 05:46 PM 613 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CaptainSkully

1525 posts in 3398 days


02-25-2017 05:46 PM

Hey folks,

I’m faced with what I call a “nice problem to have”. I need to build a detached 2 story shed in my Mother In Law’s yard for a shop on the ground floor and storage upstairs. The idea has a two-fold approach. First, the shop will be built so that it can then be setup to remodel the rest of the house. Second, the upstairs will originally be used for storage, but then will evolve into an office/home gym. I want to do a gable out the side of the gambrel roof for a sliding glass door for exterior access to the second story so stairs won’t chew up the interior space. BTW, the footprint of the building needs to be in the neighborhood of 20’ x 20’ to minimize the number of trees affected.

I’ve done a ton of research and the closest thing I’ve found is Samurai Carpenters remodel of the upstairs of his shop. If anyone has any links that aren’t Ted’s Woodworking, I’d really appreciate it.

Thanks!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails


5 replies so far

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8iowa

1566 posts in 3601 days


#1 posted 02-25-2017 11:26 PM

Back in ‘07 I built my ‘Workshop in the Woods’, a garage package from Menards. It’s 24’ x 28’ with a gambrel roof and a full length loft.

I purposely eliminated the typical garage door. I was building a workshop for me, not a garage for who-ever followed me. Instead, the front of the building has 5’ wide double doors, both at ground level and at the loft above. Thus, I can stand on the bed of my pick-up truck and load wood in or out of the loft.

If I have a project that is too large to fit thru a 60” x 79” door opening…......well, I don’t have any business attempting projects like that.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

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AandCstyle

2910 posts in 2097 days


#2 posted 02-26-2017 11:24 PM

Captain, I don’t know the requirements in your area, but you may need to provide a plan for a building permit. The plan may need to be signed by an architect or a draftsman. You might consider having the required signatory do the plan for you so you can get exactly what you want. The cost should be minimal compared to the total cost of the project and may save you headaches later. FWIW

-- Art

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CaptainSkully

1525 posts in 3398 days


#3 posted 02-27-2017 04:26 PM

Hey Art,

That’s part of the problem. It’s going to be built just over the border in British Columbia, so I have no idea what about the process, codes, etc. The good news is that there’s a Home Depot right across the street!

First, I have to convince Gramma of the design.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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Woodmaster1

855 posts in 2427 days


#4 posted 02-27-2017 05:22 PM

Checkout coolhouseplans.com I used this as a resource when teaching architectural design class.

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Jero

79 posts in 2826 days


#5 posted 02-27-2017 08:16 PM

Captain – When I’m not doing woodworking as a hobby I’m employed in construction sales. We don’t do projects this “small” (more larger commercial and agricultural projects), but I’ve drawn something similar up for a friend who had one built. That one as 18’ wide x 26’ long built with 2 overhead doors below. The roof system was made up of attic storage trusses, that she used strictly for storage. The trusses were pre-built with a floor system, which saves building costs, but limits the amount of space upstairs. A 20’ wide pre-built attic truss allows a room upstairs of 10’ wide x 6’-5” tall (from our truss manufacturer in Wisconsin). So it gets kind of tight with a bunch of space allowed for the webs of the trusses. The other option would be to put a floor system spanning the entire 20’ width (made of I-joists or open-web floor trusses), and hand frame a roof system above that allowing more open space. Or, get some kind of custom truss to make up the roof system. Either scenario costing more as it’s more work than the standard gambrel attic truss.

If I were building it myself (and labor was “free”) I would go the floor system route and hand frame a roof above that of some type to allow more room upstairs versus the 10’ wide room that you get with the standard gambrel attic truss.

I would design the lower floor plan based on my needs. Door, window and overhead door placement (if necessary). Upstairs sliding door on one end of the building and a window on the other. Maybe roof dormers and windows if you feel like doing a bunch of extra framing and flashing.

Let me know if you have any particular questions!

-- Jeremy - Marshfield, WI

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