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bandsaw blade out of round

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Forum topic by avapilot posted 02-22-2017 06:39 PM 595 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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avapilot

7 posts in 1818 days


02-22-2017 06:39 PM

first, my wife gave me my first bandsaw for christmas…i am a total newbie with the bandsaw…...its a grizzly 14” anniversary edition…...i installed the riser block and purchased 3 timberwolf bandsaw blades…..i installed the 1/4” blade and made a dumb alignment adjustment….and the blade slipped off the top wheel, while it was running…..now the blade is out of round….i tried to install it to see if running it would cure the problem, but i can’t get it to stay on the wheels…...should i just purchase another or is there some way to fix this…...i know, its a costly mistake…...live and learn…..thanks for looking

bob

-- "The journey is the reward"


9 replies so far

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mrbob

182 posts in 407 days


#1 posted 02-22-2017 06:44 PM

What do you mean when you saw you keep it on the wheels? When it is running?

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bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1833 days


#2 posted 02-22-2017 06:47 PM

Go to YouTube and look for the Alex Snodgrass band saw set up video. If you follow his instructions and the blade still falls off, it’s probably the blade.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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HerbC

1687 posts in 2697 days


#3 posted 02-22-2017 07:35 PM

Also, using a 1/4 blade with a riser block installed is probably wrong. The purpose of the rise block is to increase your maximum resaw width and you generally want to use as wide a blade as the saw will use when resawing (typically 1/2 inch wide blade with a low tooth count, ideally 2 to 3 teeth per inch).

I may be wrong here since it’s been years since I had a bandsaw. Perhaps others will chime in and give you more detailed advice.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1833 days


#4 posted 02-27-2017 02:21 AM

Wouldn’t be best for resawing, but you should still be able to do detail work with a saw with a riser block on it.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2782 days


#5 posted 02-27-2017 02:31 AM

A quarter inch blade runs on my fourteen inch Powermatic ninety percent of the time. I do run it using a Carter Stabilizer guide, rather than the upper and lower bearing guides, but that is choice and not necessity.

I usually run a three or four teeth per inch blade, since I’m usually cutting things too thick for, say, a ten TPI.

If I were cutting a lot of thin stuff, I’d go with more teeth. I might even go to a 1/8” blade, but they are harder to find in the 105” sizes.


Also, using a 1/4 blade with a riser block installed is probably wrong. The purpose of the rise block is to increase your maximum resaw width and you generally want to use as wide a blade as the saw will use when resawing (typically 1/2 inch wide blade with a low tooth count, ideally 2 to 3 teeth per inch).

I may be wrong here since it s been years since I had a bandsaw. Perhaps others will chime in and give you more detailed advice.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

- HerbC


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Kelly

1821 posts in 2782 days


#6 posted 02-27-2017 02:35 AM

Are you running with the blade gullet on the center of the upper wheel and with enough tension?

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#7 posted 02-27-2017 02:39 AM

To answer the OP’s question most of the time a kinked bandsaw blade isn’t worth the trouble and belongs in the trash. I am not saying you can’t get it to run but it will never be the same and they are inexpensive. I have had sections cut out and the band rewelded on much longer and much more expensive carbide blades but they were worth the cost and the saws they were on were less finicky about blade length.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#8 posted 02-27-2017 02:49 AM

Did you bend/ kink the blade? Is that what you mean by out of round? You can just try bending it back into shape and may be able to use a vise to help straighten it out—just don’t clamp the teeth and ruin the set. It will likely vibrate and click as that part of the blade moves around various parts of the blade path and the kerf may be pretty ugly but should still useable when rougher cuts are ok.

Or when you lay it on a flat surface is it not flat? If that is the case, I think it is ruined.

Do your other blades track ok?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1568 days


#9 posted 02-27-2017 04:11 AM

Put your blade back on, and slowly turn the wheels by hand while adjusting the top wheel tracking. Once the blade goes to the center of the top wheel, and stays there, it should be adjusted properly. Close the door, and turn it on. If it comes off, you need to realign things. A bent blade can be straightened without issue. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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