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U shaped roughing gouge vs shallow roughing gouge

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Forum topic by sully909 posted 02-22-2017 01:11 AM 2444 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sully909

9 posts in 1661 days


02-22-2017 01:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: roughing gouge spindle gouge lathe

Hi turners
I’m in the market for a new roughing gouge as the only one i have now is the craftsman that came with the lathe I bought. I do have two bowl gouges but nothing for spindle work. I like the large “spoon” style of the craftsman but alot of the ones i see out there are the u shaped roughing gouges. Assuming they both have a full tang what are the major pros and cons of each if you have experience with both? I make my own lathe tool handles sometimes and i can make 95% of the tool with that craftsman gouge but eith a short tang I feel it’s an accident waiting to happen. I always love a good tool discussion so i welcome all replies Thanks Sully


9 replies so far

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1135 days


#1 posted 02-22-2017 02:47 AM

I believe what you are describing (spoon) is called a Continental, German, or Shallow flute gouge where the tool is the same thickness instead of being milled from a bar.
Below are some links to that style…
Packard (Hamlet) German: http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=tools-pkrd-gsg
Sorby Continental : http://www.thebestthings.com/newtools/sorby_sgouges.htm
Henry Taylor: Shallow: http://www.toolnut.co.uk/products/turning_tools/henry_taylor_turning_tools_-_Gouges/Shallow_Gouge_-_45mm.html
If you look at the Packard site they also carry P&N and have a Roughing Gouge (Half Round) with a substantial tang; Doug Thompson also has one. The are the deep flute with a blunt end.

I know I haven’t answered your question.
The only thing I know of is the deep flute allows you to work right up next to a detail (such as a bead) which may be more difficult with a fingernail grind.
This is mainly on the skew but skip over to about 13:30 and Alan Batty shows using the “half round”.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfeLAHQSbqk#t=15

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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sully909

9 posts in 1661 days


#2 posted 02-22-2017 03:30 AM

Thank you for the reply. I have watched that video with alan batty a few times as i hope to become half as good as he is? was? I believe we may have lost his talents and kind sole this past year. So i guess the u shaped gouges are for square to round and thats about it. Where a continental can do shallow groves and some close work nere detailedwork. My worry realy is in the spring i’m hoping to up grade from the 3/4 hp to a two hp and the craftsman just wont handle a big catch when I’m rounding out a big (3”+) spindle work. Any thoughts on thr cryo series tools fron crown and i think taylor. Gimic?

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TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#3 posted 02-22-2017 04:22 AM

That was a very informative video.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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waho6o9

8026 posts in 2410 days


#4 posted 02-22-2017 04:27 AM

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gwilki

170 posts in 1307 days


#5 posted 02-22-2017 03:18 PM

I’ve had both, but now only have the U shaped style. I really didn’t consider the spoon shape gouge a “roughing” gouge so maybe I was using it incorrectly. In terms of good waste removal, I found the U shape spindle roughing gouge is best. I bought my current one from Doug Thompson. It does not have a tang. It is made from a round bar and the “tang” is a round end similar to a bowl gouge or standard spindle gouge. It means that it is far stronger than the flat tang style.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1135 days


#6 posted 02-22-2017 03:29 PM

”....So i guess the u shaped gouges are for square to round and thats about it. Where a continental can do shallow groves and some close work nere detailedwork.”

Sully, Alan was using the deep fluted but the wings on his was not as tall (see the graphic at 13:57). It does look flatter than a lot but not nearly as flat as the “spoon” style.
Here is an excellent video by John Lucas using the deep fluted or U shape roughing gouge. I think you may agree there are lots of cuts you can make with it which are not possible with the swept back wings of the spoon style.
Thompson makes excellent tools (I have one) but if I read correctly his roughing gouge is $200. The P&N, also a good maker, is available at Packard for $103 (both unhandled). They both are extremely stout.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=tools-pn-rouggo

The video about 10 minutes. Hope this helps.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8YYYYA-6jQ

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1968 days


#7 posted 02-23-2017 10:32 AM

You can do the same cuts with your craftsman gouge as a U-shaped, German or Continental gouge. The Continental is more in line with your craftsman style gouge. Have both 3/4” & 1 1/2” Henry Taylor U-shape gouges and like them more than the old sears gouge. Either a 3/4” or 1” U-shape gouge will serve you well. Either the Packard brand made by Hamlet or a P & N , U-shape roughing gouge will severe you well.

-- Bill

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EricTwice

228 posts in 367 days


#8 posted 02-23-2017 10:54 AM

I have both, and prefer the U shaped roughing gouge. I like the tall sides. They keep the gouge from catching at the corner and can be used like a skew.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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HokieKen

4505 posts in 972 days


#9 posted 02-23-2017 01:48 PM

I have both types as well. I prefer the U shaped ones for roughing. I re-shaped mine to sweep the sides back a bit further than is standard. Mine came in an auction boxed lot and has no name on it so I can’t recommend a specific one. The shape is very much like the one Lee linked but I found by sweeping the sides back a few degrees I can take more aggressive cuts faster on square blanks. It’s probably the cheapest and crudest turning tool I own but it does almost all of the “heavy lifting”!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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