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Forum topic by Karda posted 02-18-2017 05:52 PM 535 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


02-18-2017 05:52 PM

I will not ask what brand tools to start turning with been plenty of that, what My question is what size. Never turned before so I will not be doing anything small like pens. I don’t want to get tools to small or to big. Any suggestions


19 replies so far

View mpax356's profile

mpax356

72 posts in 2327 days


#1 posted 02-18-2017 09:45 PM

Start with a 3/8” spindle gouge and a 1/2” (bar diameter – US measurement nor British. A British 1/2” BG is actually /8” bar diameter). For a Spindle Roughing Gouge, I would suggest a 3/4” or 7/8” but a 1” or 1 1/4” is fine as well but probably not really an improvement for most spindle work. For a skew, I would go with 3/4”. 1/2” skew is too small for most skew work and would be a specialty tool.

-- MPax, Atlanta

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#2 posted 02-18-2017 10:26 PM

thanks, what is bar diameter

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#3 posted 02-18-2017 10:43 PM

3/4 – 1” roughing gouge, 3/8 spindle gouge, 1” oval skew, and you could use an 1/16-1/8 cut off tool if you want. These tools will get you through the main learning process. Later on you can move in to fine hollowing tools, carbide tipped, and such. I have not used a cut off tool since my second turning. I use a saw blade and that size depends on the turning size. everything from a hack saw blade to a limb saw.

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#4 posted 02-18-2017 10:58 PM

ok, is the cut off tool the same as a parting tool. Can you cut od the work while it is still in the lathe. What is the difference between a regular skew and an oval skew

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#5 posted 02-18-2017 11:11 PM

Yes, cut off and parting are the same thing. I actually have a 1/16” inch but only use it for narrow deep grooves. Regular skew chisels are a flat bar, rectangluler shape. An Oval skew has flat edges but the face and back surface is slightly bowed. The oval skew will glide along the tool rest easlily where the normal skew will tend to dig into the rest as you slide along the tool rest.

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

458 posts in 1136 days


#6 posted 02-18-2017 11:51 PM

I would suggest a 3/8 spindle gouge (maybe 1/2” but not over).
A 1” Spindle Roughing Gouge (maybe down to 3/4”)

Bowl Gouge…. I think MPax forgot the “5” on the 5/8. UK Bowl Gouges are sized by the width of the flute, US bowl gouges are sized by the thickness of the bar. A UK is typically 1/8” larger than a US. This applies only to bowl gouges, not spindle gouges. So a 1/2” UK = 5/8” US, a 3/8” UK = 1/2” US…
I would go with a 1/2” by US measure.

A parting tool…most are the same unless you want the thin one but they are not made for heavy work. You normally don’t completely part the item off on the lathe, you leave just a little bit then saw it off. They are also used for a lot of other reasons such as cutting tenons, setting depths for spindle work, etc.

Skew…at least 3/4 but I suggest a 1”. Flat or oval? Both work but I prefer the flat. Round the corners slightly and it won’t catch on the tool rest. Some folks swear by the oval others state they are only good for planting tulips.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#7 posted 02-18-2017 11:52 PM

thanks for the information

View BrianNH's profile

BrianNH

17 posts in 1968 days


#8 posted 02-19-2017 12:02 AM

This is the set of tools that I picked out for my son this past Christmas:

3/4” roughing gouge
3/8” bowl gouge
1/2” spindle gouge
Diamond parting tool
3/4” skew

Some background – I’ve been turning for ~20 years so I have my personal preferences. Rather than purchasing a “set”, I hand picked each tool and built up my own set. I know that you didn’t ask for brands, but most of the tools that I purchased were Artisan brand from Craft Supplies USA – just mentioned this in case you want to look them up for US vs British sizing. This seems like a good all around set that will let my son get going with a variety of spindle projects as well as getting started with bowl turning. If I were to add to this set, I might also add a narrow parting tool and maybe other sizes of spindle/bowl gouges. I personally use a 1 3/8” skew for lots of things, but a smaller skew is helpful for some of the smaller and more intricate projects.

For bowls, I typically prefer a 3/8” bowl gouge (Sorby or Glaser sizing) for most of my work. I do go with a larger 5/8” bowl gouge for roughing blanks from logs just for speed, but not necessary if you’re just starting out.

-- Brian - Snow Dog Woodworks - http://www.snowdogwoodworks.com

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#9 posted 02-19-2017 12:04 AM

Thanks for the explaination Lee, I was lost on the UK bar thing too.

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

412 posts in 2119 days


#10 posted 02-19-2017 01:20 AM

I would add one more to what has been suggested. I use a 1” scraper a lot. I would go with a 3/4” skew and a 1” scraper. If you are looking to do lidded boxes or bowls you will need some type of hollowing tool. I prefer a hooked scraper for this.

-- Bill R

View jeff's profile

jeff

1059 posts in 3300 days


#11 posted 02-19-2017 03:58 AM

All good advice.How will you sharpen your tools?.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#12 posted 02-19-2017 04:04 AM



All good advice.How will you sharpen your tools?.

- jeff


Karda has another thread about sharpening. But I freehand all my sharpening on a slow speed wet grinder.

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#13 posted 02-19-2017 04:40 AM

allot of good information here. I put together a slow grinder don’t look pretty but ut does the job, with a 80 grit 1 inch wheel I think i can make a jig for sharpening. but I have to get the lathe first but before I can do that KI got to figure out how I will get it in the house and down cellar.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#14 posted 02-19-2017 05:13 AM

Karda, you have to man up and Johnny Cash that bad boy. Remember…One piece at a time! There is my grinder….
Top left corner of the sander cart. It’s an old HF wet grinder from about 2000. It’s a shame they don’t still carry them, it has a small diameter wide high speed wheel on the other side too.

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#15 posted 02-19-2017 05:20 AM

yea well I am in a position where I have to do with what i have. speaking of grinders can i use silicone carbide wheels or do I need aluminum oxide

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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