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Painting brick

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 02-16-2017 01:12 PM 568 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

242 posts in 493 days


02-16-2017 01:12 PM

Ok guys I need some advice. I have recently been asked to paint a relatives house for them. I have done plenty of painting on houses, but this house is brick, and they want the brick painted either white or tan. I have never painted brick and was hoping you guys could give me some advice and answer a few questions.

First, I am wondering if using an airless sprayer is a good way of applying the paint and primer? Maybe the $240 Grace unit from Home Depot. I would imagine that it would take forever with a roller.

Second, this is old, rough faced (not smooth faced) brick. Do you guys know if this brick will soak up a massive amount of paint? The house is roughly 45 foot wide by 65 foot deep and the brick part is 8 foot tall.

Third, can anyone offer any advise on keep the over spray from getting too out of hand? I thought about making some 8 foot tall by roughly 4 foot wide walls/barriers out of 2×4’s framed up like a small wall covered in 4 mil plastic that I could put on the ends of the side that I am spraying and moving them as I go.

Any other advice that you guys could give me would be great. Thanks in advance to anyone that offers any input.


16 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2949 posts in 546 days


#1 posted 02-16-2017 03:15 PM

IMHO I would NOT do it
oh yeah this is Lumberjocks :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2326 days


#2 posted 02-16-2017 03:49 PM

It’s been years since I helped someone do this, but I recall it took an incredible amount of paint. We rolled (this was in the early 70’s) and the roller didn’t get everything, so we had to go back with brushes and touch up the spots on the primer coat. Spraying would have been so much easier. We did 2 coats, obviously the first one was the most work. But we primed (and I recall that being a masonry primer of some kind), then top coated with a latex house paint. Pretty sure just one coat would not have hid the color of the bricks. Can’t help with the airless sprayer concerns. I know you said this was for a relative, but you might want to try and palm this off onto someone else.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Dustin

404 posts in 574 days


#3 posted 02-16-2017 04:00 PM

My parents painted our (now my) house when I was about 10. We converted our overhead garage door into a walk in, and couldn’t find bricks to match the existing, so I got stuck helping my dad paint it. Pretty much the same experience Fred described above. Rolled out a lot, touched up the seems with a brush. Now I have the only painted-brick house in the neighborhood and I hate it, but blasting off the paint would be a ton of work.

Oh, and it was about this time that my dad started looking to hire someone with experience spraying (he was a painting contractor), so I tend to think that would have been his preferred option.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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Tony1212

146 posts in 1568 days


#4 posted 02-16-2017 04:22 PM

I can only speak to my experience with my house. My house was built in the 60’s and the entire first floor exterior walls are poured concrete that used forms to look like brick. It had been painted numerous times by the time I bought it 10 years ago. When I bought it, it was a drab gray color. Like a cold, gray sky in winter, it made you sad just looking at it.

I have a friend that is a union painter and has years of experience, so it probably went a lot quicker than it will for you. He used an airless paint sprayer (which you can rent from HD if you don’t want to buy and store it) and lots of masking tape and plastic drop cloths. The entire job was done in 4 hours. But since there were already so many coats, the paint didn’t really soak in.

Before

After

The tan color was the color we chose for the grout lines in the “brick”. I then used a roller to paint the brick faces. But I made such a mess, I had to go back with an artists brush and touch up the grout lines. I should have just sprayed the house red and did the grout lines by hand. I would have saved a couple hundred dollars on paint.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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tealetm

87 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 02-16-2017 04:57 PM

Block filler first- then a good paint. Sherwin Williams is very familiar with this process and can advise you on quantities.

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SweetTea

242 posts in 493 days


#6 posted 02-18-2017 11:03 AM

I spoke to a guy at the Shermin Williams store in Memphis, and he suggested that I go with their Loxon primer. He told me that this is a dedicated masonary primer that was designed to be sprayed with an airless sprayer for just these purposes. It coats and seals the brick so that when I go to shoot on the base coat, it won’t take nearly as much paint because otherwise, if I went with a non dedicated masonary primer the brick would suck the paint up like crazy.

Only thing is, the Loxon primer is $58 per gallon! I have just under 1,700sq/ft of brick to primer and paint. Which if estimating the amount of paint that I will need, I believe that comes to 8.5 gallons of the Loxon primer and 8.5 gallons of their exterior paint. Does this sound reasonable?

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SweetTea

242 posts in 493 days


#7 posted 02-18-2017 11:06 AM

Also, the guy that I spoke with there at Shermin Williams suggested that I use an airless sprayer, (which I was already planning on using) and have a second person come in behind where I spray and “back roll” the paint and primer with a roller. Does that sound right to you guys?

Any other helpful tips or advice you guys could help me out with would be much appreciated!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2326 days


#8 posted 02-18-2017 12:16 PM

The paint quantity sounds right, or at least it doesn’t sound wrong, I can’t imagine what the purpose of the “back roll” is. Did he say why that was important? BTW, don’t forget to “box” your top coat paint. This is mixing the various cans together in case one has a tint that’s slightly off. The way I’ve always done it was to start with 2 cans and mix them together and start painting. Then after the first gallon was used up, mix the 3rd can with the remaining one from the opening effort. Continue to go that way until finished. If you buy too much primer, you can probably returned the unopened cans, that might be true of the top coat unless it’s a custom tint.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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SweetTea

242 posts in 493 days


#9 posted 02-19-2017 11:25 AM



The paint quantity sounds right, or at least it doesn t sound wrong, I can t imagine what the purpose of the “back roll” is. Did he say why that was important? BTW, don t forget to “box” your top coat paint. This is mixing the various cans together in case one has a tint that s slightly off. The way I ve always done it was to start with 2 cans and mix them together and start painting. Then after the first gallon was used up, mix the 3rd can with the remaining one from the opening effort. Continue to go that way until finished. If you buy too much primer, you can probably returned the unopened cans, that might be true of the top coat unless it s a custom tint.

- Fred Hargis

Yes, I am familiar with mixing the different cans together to avoid variations in the final color. I plan to get one 5 gallon bucket of the Loxon primer with 3 other gallons of the same Loxon primer. I will try to keep mixing the single gallons in to the 5 gallon bucket as I go. I will do the exact same thing for the paint. Thanks for the advice man!

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SweetTea

242 posts in 493 days


#10 posted 02-19-2017 11:26 AM

How do you guys think that I should handle the overspray produced by the airless sprayer? Should I build some portable walls framed out of 2×4’s covered in plastic?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2326 days


#11 posted 02-19-2017 01:01 PM

I probably wouldn’t, at least in the beginning. If the overspray turns out to be a problem, I’d improvise at the time. You might need some cheap tarps to cover plants or something below.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1497 posts in 1221 days


#12 posted 02-19-2017 02:12 PM



How do you guys think that I should handle the overspray produced by the airless sprayer? Should I build some portable walls framed out of 2×4 s covered in plastic?

- SweetTea

The pros usually use a handheld paint shield from my experience. I’ve just used a piece of cardboard for small projects.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SweetTea

242 posts in 493 days


#13 posted 02-20-2017 10:44 AM

I am assuming that I would want a tip that produces a very wide fan pattern?

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corelz125

312 posts in 809 days


#14 posted 02-20-2017 11:53 AM

Sherwin williams has sales all the time look for a 30% or even on occasion 40% off coupon. It’s expensive paint but their paint is quality. Don’t want to use a cheap paint on the exterior of a house. Nice job on the house tony1212

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2326 days


#15 posted 02-20-2017 12:11 PM

You might (want a wide spray pattern) but you also need to have enough fluid flow to spray that pattern. So that’s probably another question for the paint store (or wherever you buy the sprayer).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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