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Bandsaws: 14" and 18" w/ same resaw capacity?

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Forum topic by maxwellllll posted 02-16-2017 05:12 AM 1018 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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maxwellllll

17 posts in 389 days


02-16-2017 05:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw resaw resawing

I’m confused. What determines resaw capacity on a bandsaw? The machine’s design obviously does, but I can’t wrap my head around how there are 14” and 18” bandsaws (Rikon 10-324 & 10-342, for example) that have the exact same (13”) resaw capacity, and there are even 14” models with greater resaw capacity (10-353 @ 14”). I realize that an 18 has more rip capacity, but is that it?

I know I’m missing something, but google isn’t doing the trick for me tonight.


14 replies so far

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papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#1 posted 02-16-2017 05:25 AM

Saw size, 14”-18” is the distance from the blade to the nearest frame, usually the rear blade guard. Resaw capacity is the distance between the table and the highest guide position. Most all 14” saws have 6” resaw, but also most can use a riser block to ad another 6” of resaw cap. I don’t know the resaw of the other size or brands, just have to look them up. I believe Rikon has some of the most resaw caps

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#2 posted 02-16-2017 05:34 AM



Saw size, 14”-18” is the distance from the blade to the nearest frame, usually the rear blade guard.
- papadan

Which also is the wheel diameter.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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maxwellllll

17 posts in 389 days


#3 posted 02-16-2017 05:44 AM


Saw size, 14”-18” is the distance from the blade to the nearest frame, usually the rear blade guard.
- papadan

Which also is the wheel diameter.

- RichTaylor

Right. I understand why they are labeled 14” and 18”. I don’t understand the disparity in resaw capacity.

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3156 days


#4 posted 02-16-2017 05:57 AM


Saw size, 14”-18” is the distance from the blade to the nearest frame, usually the rear blade guard.
- papadan

Which also is the wheel diameter.

- RichTaylor

Right. I understand why they are labeled 14” and 18”. I don t understand the disparity in resaw capacity.

- maxwellllll

First, you need to understand the huge desire for greater resaw height is a relatively new trend in hobby saws. 12” of vertical capacity was the norm for 20” bandsaws for many years. Even many industrial saws had rather meager resaw height compared to many modern steel spined saws. It is simply the trend to have as much vertical capacity as possible and small saws reflect this.

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bigblockyeti

4697 posts in 1555 days


#5 posted 02-16-2017 11:57 AM

+1 to what has already been stated and I’ll add that with a larger saw comes more capability. More weight, more power, larger table, more robust fence, these all add up to a machine that can do more and ultimately costs more too. The wheel diameter is of particular importance if you’re planning on heavy resaw work as the thicker blades don’t last very long when tensioned around a smaller 7” radius. The bigger the better from a blade life standpoint but that also makes for a more expensive blade, especially when you get into carbide tipped blades that can get into the $2.00/inch price range. Heavier blades also require a stronger frame as the tension (PSI) still needs to be about the same as smaller blades but you’re dealing with a blade that has a much larger cross sectional area.

Bottom line is if you’re wanting to do a lot of resaw work, you’ll typically do well to look for a saw that is advertised as excelling at the task and the review section right here on Lumberjocks is filled with many different makes and models to help ease your buying experience. Good luck!

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maxwellllll

17 posts in 389 days


#6 posted 02-16-2017 01:03 PM

Very helpful, guys. Thank you!!

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them700project

115 posts in 853 days


#7 posted 02-16-2017 01:11 PM

I just bought Laguna 14suv. It fits into the having as much or more resaw than some of its bigger brothers. The blades are 125” which is 20” longer than most standard 14” saws. They are spreading the centers of the wheels more to get more distance between table and top wheel.

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WhyMe

909 posts in 1395 days


#8 posted 02-16-2017 04:02 PM

You need to take into account the blade length. One Rikon 14” uses 111” blades while another 14” uses 142” blades and yet there’s only 1” more resaw with the 142” blade model, 13” resaw vs. 14” resaw.

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ArtMann

683 posts in 650 days


#9 posted 02-16-2017 04:19 PM

I have been resawing for a decade and I can’t remember a time when I wanted more than 12 inches. Planks wider than 12 inches just aren’t very common. I seldom cut veneer though.

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maxwellllll

17 posts in 389 days


#10 posted 02-16-2017 09:28 PM



You need to take into account the blade length. One Rikon 14” uses 111” blades while another 14” uses 142” blades and yet there s only 1” more resaw with the 142” blade model, 13” resaw vs. 14” resaw.

- WhyMe

OK. This is making sense to me now. I hadn’t even thought to look at blade length. So, basically, once these saws break the 12” barrier, they’re typically set up primarily to do resting. Hence the lower tables, etc.

So all that being said, why go 18” vs 14”? If hp is equal/similar, then we’re mostly looking at an increase in rip capacity, as well as some more flexibility in cutting curves in longer/wider stock, correct?

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WhyMe

909 posts in 1395 days


#11 posted 02-16-2017 10:00 PM

One other reason to go 18” vs. 14” is blade width. Rikon as an example, the typical 14” takes up to 3/4’ blades , whereas 18” takes up to 1-3/8” width blades. Wider blades supposedly are better for resawing.

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MrRon

4492 posts in 3078 days


#12 posted 02-17-2017 05:49 PM

A 14” BS with 6” of resaw capacity, can be fitted with a 6” riser block, but the HP needed to resaw thicker wood goes up. It takes power to resaw wood that is 10” thick. It’s not the blade length that is important; it is the HP needed to slice through the wood. Using a wider blade doesn’t help if the BS can’t provide the additional blade tension. Using a narrower blade would result in permitting higher tension. That can result in better resawing than with a wider blade and lower tension.

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jimintx

509 posts in 1419 days


#13 posted 02-17-2017 06:01 PM

You began the question by saying you could not wrap your head around the bandsaw size and capacity topic. To answer that specifically, rather than telling you why you might want one versus another, or adding other considerations in the selection process, you have to think about the geometry of these saws.

As a historical convention, the “SIZE” of the saw is the diameter of the wheels in the saw. You can then readily see that the maximum width of the cut, the throat size, is limited to the diameter of the wheels, commonly less a little to accommodate the frame of the saw.

(It is outside this topic, but note that a three-wheel saw can use small wheels because the extra wheel is placed further back in the saw frame, and routes the blade away from the vertical cutting side of the moving blade.)

The “RESAW” capacity, being a vertical measurement, is very simply governed by the distance between the wheels. In the older design, cast frame saws, when you add a riser block you are simply spreading the wheels further apart by raising the upper wheel.

The steel frame saws now offered by Laguna, Rikon, Jet, and so on, are not limited by the structural characteristics of the cast frame, and can be built with the wheels further apart while still maintaining adequate frame rigidity to control the blade.

Hope this helps your thinking.
Jim
.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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maxwellllll

17 posts in 389 days


#14 posted 02-18-2017 04:47 PM


Hope this helps your thinking.
Jim

- jimintx

That was very helpful, Jim. I’m pretty clear now on the basics. For some reason I was thinking that wheel size was related in some way to vertical (resaw) capacity, but it’s pretty obvious to me now why those two things aren’t really related at all. At the end of the day, it comes down to power and design more than anything. I guess in theory, one could make a 10” bandsaw with 30” of resaw capacity if you really wanted to…

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