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attach casement to jamb

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Forum topic by harum posted 02-16-2017 04:44 AM 396 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

260 posts in 1478 days


02-16-2017 04:44 AM

Hello, I’ve tried asking this question at another forum and got not a single suggestion. To replace the old side light with a new one I’m building new jamb and casement for an insulated glass unit.

My question is: Considering that the side light has to be air and moisture tight, and also structurally sturdy, how do I attach the wood casement to a 3/4” thick wood jamb? Just waterproof glue and stops/molding on both sides and a lot of caulk? Or do a dado joint or an interior rabbet?

Would appreciate any comment.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


10 replies so far

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Cathie Zimmerman

101 posts in 648 days


#1 posted 02-16-2017 05:05 AM

Trying to visualize what exactly you are trying to accomplish and still not quite sure. Can you explain a bit more?

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harum

260 posts in 1478 days


#2 posted 02-16-2017 06:04 AM

Thanks! Well, nothing fancy. I have a rough opening 11” x 82” where I want to put a new side light. It’s a narrow opening, so I’m making the jamb out of 3/4” lumber. The side light is two IGUs and a floating panel in a standard rails and stiles casement. The jamb is 5” deep, the casement is 1-3/4” deep. Trying to find out how do carpenters fix casements/sashes inside jambs.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View mike02130's profile

mike02130

167 posts in 507 days


#3 posted 02-16-2017 01:43 PM

I’ve been a finish carpenter for thirty years. The best way to do it is to read a book. That will teach you more and then some. Might give you a better sense of accomplishment, too.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

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waho6o9

8027 posts in 2411 days


#4 posted 02-16-2017 01:46 PM

Any book recommendations would be appreciated.

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JBrow

1273 posts in 755 days


#5 posted 02-16-2017 02:06 PM

Harum,

Not being a carpenter, I can only guess how the casement would be approached. I think a carpenter’s approach would be flat stock with stays attached to the flat stock to form interior rabbets in the casement for the panel and the glass. Once the solid panel is in place, the interior moulding would be tacked in place to keep the panel fixed in place. A carpenter could brad or screw glass stops in place to hold the glass. The casement would then be set into the jamb. The joints would probably all be nailed together and would be caulked when the unit is installed.

I would approach the problem a little differently since I have the time and fancy myself a woodworker. The casement would feature dados to receive the solid panel and interior cut rabbets for the glass. The rails and stiles making up the casement frame would be mortised and tenoned together. I would then install the glass in a bed of clear silicone. The interior glass stops would be installed with interior trim screws.

The jab frame would be a rectangular frame milled with a dado and tongue joints and shallow dados to receive the casement. When assembling the jamb, the casement frame would be glued into the shallow dados and the corner dado and tongue joints glued with a couple of brad nails to reinforce the joints.

If the solid panel is solid wood versus plywood, I would caulk the exterior joints surrounding the panel. The exterior side of the panel could be set in a bed of silicone caulk during fabrication of the casement or caulked with a silicone-latex caulk during installation into the side light opening. If plywood, I would probably glue the plywood panel in place.

A water-resistant glue like TiteBond III would be a good glue choice in this application.

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mike02130

167 posts in 507 days


#6 posted 02-16-2017 02:10 PM

A better man than I gave you a good answer.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14843 posts in 2453 days


#7 posted 02-16-2017 03:00 PM

Google might be your friend in this case. Not exactly what you’ve described, but here’s one of the first couple hits when I searched “book installing jamb and casement”.

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2012/06/29/how-to-install-interior-extension-jambs-and-window-trim

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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harum

260 posts in 1478 days


#8 posted 02-16-2017 03:24 PM


Google might be your friend in this case. Not exactly what you ve described, but here s one of the first couple hits when I searched “book installing jamb and casement”.

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2012/06/29/how-to-install-interior-extension-jambs-and-window-trim

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

I bought a book on doormaking and a book on windowmaking, went through two door/window making library books, searched the internet. None of them answers my specific question:

how to attach/install a finished casement into a jamb, or build a casement-jamb assembly, so that the entire assembly is weather-proof.

One of the books actually suggests to just slide the casement in and then use stops around the casement on both sides. This is what the old side light is—I thought I could do better.

JBrow has mentioned shallow dados/grooves and interior cut rabbets. So, I guess this is what I’ll do. Thinking of cutting grooves on the casement rather than on the the jamb. Greatly appreciate your response, JBrow!

Thanks for all the suggestions—great help!

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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harum

260 posts in 1478 days


#9 posted 02-16-2017 03:57 PM

Thanks for all the responses!

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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harum

260 posts in 1478 days


#10 posted 02-16-2017 05:47 PM


Any book recommendations would be appreciated.

- waho6o9

Yes, I’d be interested in good books too. I have: John Birchard’s books, Anthony Talbot’s book. They are great sources of anything doors and windows. Still some details are unclear for a first time amateur window maker. As for the internet, I haven’t found anything detailed enough to be of much help in this project. It’s good to be able to ask questions on a very few specialized forums.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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