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Angle Grinder for Power Carving? Advice Needed

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Forum topic by Slider20 posted 02-15-2017 06:11 PM 2525 views 1 time favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


02-15-2017 06:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: angle grinder

Looking to make a Scupted Rocking chair, and plan on scooping out the seats and some of the shaping with the Holey Galahad and Lancelot disks.

I don’t have much experience with angle grinders, but I would think for wood it would be nice to have variable speed? Might do some metal work at some point.

Seems Metabo has a 5” Variable speed angle grinder, will this work well with the 4 1/2 disks from King Arthur Tools?

Any suggestions or recommendations?

I’d like this to be a versatile tool that I can use after this project as well, and. It just on wood.


32 replies so far

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2565 posts in 1864 days


#1 posted 02-15-2017 11:21 PM

Practice on scrap with your chain saw circlets before attacking your good material. Those disks are very aggressive, and tend to pull themselves deeper into the wood.

Another good attachment for the grinder is a flap sanding disk, one with a convex shape. Can clean up a lot of the roughness from the chain saw disks.

I can’t say whether there is any advantage to the variable speed. I have never felt the need for it. Also, the guard on a 5” grinder will somewhat restrict your use from a 4 1/2” disk

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View ajshobby's profile

ajshobby

87 posts in 2147 days


#2 posted 02-16-2017 12:46 AM

I work with angle grinders constantly. Metabo grinders make some unique grinders that make them a must have for the pipe trades. I honestly wouldn’t buy anything else. However for home hobby use I have a metabo, DeWalt and Makita. I find they all work well. I prefer paddle switched grinders (have to hold the paddle down to run the grinder) over a on off for any type of grinding / heavy stock removal purely from a safety standpoint. For wire wheel or polishing pads / sanding discs use I like the on off switch style over a paddle switch. You milage may very depending on work flow.

AJ in mpls

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


#3 posted 02-16-2017 01:20 AM



Practice on scrap with your chain saw circlets before attacking your good material. Those disks are very aggressive, and tend to pull themselves deeper into the wood.

Another good attachment for the grinder is a flap sanding disk, one with a convex shape. Can clean up a lot of the roughness from the chain saw disks.

I can t say whether there is any advantage to the variable speed. I have never felt the need for it. Also, the guard on a 5” grinder will somewhat restrict your use from a 4 1/2” disk

- runswithscissors

Thank you for the suggestion, I will look into those, I’ll take it slow before I move onto the Walnut that I hope to use, that stuff is pricey.


I work with angle grinders constantly. Metabo grinders make some unique grinders that make them a must have for the pipe trades. I honestly wouldn t buy anything else. However for home hobby use I have a metabo, DeWalt and Makita. I find they all work well. I prefer paddle switched grinders (have to hold the paddle down to run the grinder) over a on off for any type of grinding / heavy stock removal purely from a safety standpoint. For wire wheel or polishing pads / sanding discs use I like the on off switch style over a paddle switch. You milage may very depending on work flow.

AJ in mpls

- ajshobby

I think I will look for a paddle switch, being new to them, I would rather err on the side of caution.

View Thegrinderblog's profile

Thegrinderblog

1 post in 303 days


#4 posted 02-16-2017 05:56 PM

Hey Slider

You may find reviews of the recent top angle grinder on my blog:

http://thegrinderblog.net/5-best-angle-grinder/

This maybe helps you to find a suitable grinder for you.

Best regards!

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


#5 posted 02-16-2017 06:28 PM



Hey Slider

You may find reviews of the recent top angle grinder on my blog:

http://thegrinderblog.net/5-best-angle-grinder/

This maybe helps you to find a suitable grinder for you.

Best regards!

- Thegrinderblog

Thanks so much.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27095 posts in 2177 days


#6 posted 02-16-2017 06:54 PM

King Arthur heads work, but my experience says they cause stitches also.

I use both the Kutzall disks and 24 grit sanding disks. Both work very well.

I also agree, practice on scraps first.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


#7 posted 02-16-2017 08:03 PM



King Arthur heads work, but my experience says they cause stitches also.

I use both the Kutzall disks and 24 grit sanding disks. Both work very well.

I also agree, practice on scraps first.

- Monte Pittman

That’s pretty scary, definitely will be going with a paddle switch model grinder.

What specific attachments were you using? User error?

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#8 posted 02-16-2017 08:08 PM

Last year I bought a 5” Hitachi variable speed grinder and I love it. It’s very powerful, smooth, and relatively quiet. Disclosure, I don’t have a lot of experience with angle grinders. But I’m wanting to pick up a Kutzall disc and build one of the coffee stands from the 360 Woodworking website.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

335 posts in 724 days


#9 posted 02-16-2017 08:28 PM

get an adze and a scorp. Become one with the wood. The angle grinder thing just seems like a scary tool.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


#10 posted 02-16-2017 08:59 PM



get an adze and a scorp. Become one with the wood. The angle grinder thing just seems like a scary tool.

- sawdustdad

Nice sentiment, but I have 3 little kids plus I work long hours, I don’t get too much time in the shop, so for me speed is the name of the game if I ever want to finish a project.

Currently my “shop” is filled with 2 bookshelves in pieces that have been waiting for 2 weeks for the final layer of Varnish, hope I’ll get to it soon so I can start another project.

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


#11 posted 02-16-2017 09:01 PM

Bit the bullet, went for a Metabo 4 1/2 inch grinder with a paddle switch, found a good price on the anniversary model, like the colors and seems to be a decent tool. Since nobody is encouraging variable speed why spend the extra $100 for it.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2905 posts in 2096 days


#12 posted 02-16-2017 10:02 PM

Slider, you might want to consider some serious dust collection and/or wearing a respirator and maybe even a face mask.

-- Art

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 360 days


#13 posted 02-16-2017 10:35 PM



Slider, you might want to consider some serious dust collection and/or wearing a respirator and maybe even a face mask.

- AandCstyle


I don’t think I would use this inside my garage, way too messy, driveway seems smarter.

I always wear a respirator and glasses while woodworking, I have asthsma and saw dust seriously irritates it.

I agree, a face mask would be nice, but I have a big head (not just figuratively), and I need my respirator to fit under the face shield. I usually wear goggles when I use my lathe as ship go everywhere, but this seems even more extreme.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17031 posts in 2845 days


#14 posted 02-16-2017 10:56 PM

Keep the guard on the grinder. Ive seen some gnarly injuries from grinders.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2708 posts in 3276 days


#15 posted 02-16-2017 11:08 PM

My angle grinder story:

I use an angle grinder a lot. Can’t beat them as a tool that when you need it nothing else will do. Anyway, I also weld and all my cuts are done with a 4” grinder. Why 4”? Well, my brother worked in a place where they had 4” wheels laying around all over the place. He’d bring a few home each week… for 30 years. I’ve got a huge box of them.
Anyway. I started out with a porter cable. It lasted a good while… about two years. I used it a lot on metal so I thought that was a good deal. Next when that burnt out, I decided on some harbor freight cheap ones. I bought three. Each lasted, I kid you not… about 20 minutes. I then purchased a milwaulkee. I got over a year out of that one. Not long enough.

Finally I went to sears only because for 7 bucks I could get a clean replacement warranty for 3 years. I thought, “It will burn out and I’ll never have to buy one again”. That was 8 years ago. It’s beat up, welding burned but still going strong.

Now, I’m not promoting craftsman tools. Except for wrenches I own very few of them. But this one is a gem.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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