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How to secure back to frame?

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Forum topic by trevor7428 posted 02-15-2017 03:09 AM 503 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trevor7428

236 posts in 795 days


02-15-2017 03:09 AM

I guess I wasn’t thinking clearly when designing this frame. I’m trying to figure out the best way to secure the back to the frame.

Currently the mdf back is flush with the back or poplar frame. I have these metal french cleat style things, I was planing to use to mount it to the wall.

My original idea was to route in the back mdf panel for one of these french cleat things to fit in. So it will mount flush to the wall. I guess if I didn’t do that and there was a gap between the wall and frame I could use something similar to picture frames. That would mount to the poplar frame and swing over the back panel to hold it in place.

Wouldn’t a gap between the wall and frame look weird or not professional?

Any ideas would be much appreciated.

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion


5 replies so far

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JBrow

1273 posts in 754 days


#1 posted 02-16-2017 03:10 AM

trevor7428,

Your post was a little hard to follow. But amid my confusion I will weigh in.

No, I do not believe that a picture frame hung on the wall that does not set flush against the wall is unprofessional. I personally see nothing wrong with a pair of small eye hooks that supports a wire for hanging a picture frame on a nail or picture hanging hook. In this configuration, the top of the fame generally stands off the wall while the bottom of the frame is in full contact with the wall.

Nonetheless and apparently like you, I prefer that my picture frames hug the wall from top to bottom. If the MDF backer is ½” thick, it seems to me that the MDF could be secured flush to the frame by routing a shallow relief in the back and frame into which a screw through a small fender washer could be recessed. The screw would be sunk into the frame and the fender washer would over lap and catch the MDF back.

A shallow relief could be router into the MDF to receive the French cleat hardware shown into your post. This would allow the frame to set flush or nearly flush with the wall. It could be difficult to find screws short enough for attaching the French cleat. But the pointed ends of the screws that secure the French cleat into the recess in the MDF back could be filed flush; preventing the point of the screw from piercing the picture mounted in the frame.

I am not sure how much success you could have by routing recesses into ¼” MDF. In this case flush mounting the screw/fender washer backer retainers and French cleat may be required.

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jerryminer

800 posts in 1276 days


#2 posted 02-16-2017 04:06 PM

I have used those metal clips (“Z” clips) to hang mirrors on the wall. I add a small strip of wood around the perimeter of the frame—on the back side—-just slightly thinner than the clip, and inset slightly from the edge.

This gives a small shadow line and hides the hardware, while keeping the frame tight to the wall.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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trevor7428

236 posts in 795 days


#3 posted 02-17-2017 07:23 AM



trevor7428,

Your post was a little hard to follow. But amid my confusion I will weigh in.

No, I do not believe that a picture frame hung on the wall that does not set flush against the wall is unprofessional. I personally see nothing wrong with a pair of small eye hooks that supports a wire for hanging a picture frame on a nail or picture hanging hook. In this configuration, the top of the fame generally stands off the wall while the bottom of the frame is in full contact with the wall.

Nonetheless and apparently like you, I prefer that my picture frames hug the wall from top to bottom. If the MDF backer is ½” thick, it seems to me that the MDF could be secured flush to the frame by routing a shallow relief in the back and frame into which a screw through a small fender washer could be recessed. The screw would be sunk into the frame and the fender washer would over lap and catch the MDF back.

A shallow relief could be router into the MDF to receive the French cleat hardware shown into your post. This would allow the frame to set flush or nearly flush with the wall. It could be difficult to find screws short enough for attaching the French cleat. But the pointed ends of the screws that secure the French cleat into the recess in the MDF back could be filed flush; preventing the point of the screw from piercing the picture mounted in the frame.

I am not sure how much success you could have by routing recesses into ¼” MDF. In this case flush mounting the screw/fender washer backer retainers and French cleat may be required.

- JBrow

That’s actually a great idea. I think I might just do that washer idea.

Thanks

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

View trevor7428's profile

trevor7428

236 posts in 795 days


#4 posted 02-17-2017 07:28 AM



trevor7428,

Your post was a little hard to follow. But amid my confusion I will weigh in.

No, I do not believe that a picture frame hung on the wall that does not set flush against the wall is unprofessional. I personally see nothing wrong with a pair of small eye hooks that supports a wire for hanging a picture frame on a nail or picture hanging hook. In this configuration, the top of the fame generally stands off the wall while the bottom of the frame is in full contact with the wall.

Nonetheless and apparently like you, I prefer that my picture frames hug the wall from top to bottom. If the MDF backer is ½” thick, it seems to me that the MDF could be secured flush to the frame by routing a shallow relief in the back and frame into which a screw through a small fender washer could be recessed. The screw would be sunk into the frame and the fender washer would over lap and catch the MDF back.

A shallow relief could be router into the MDF to receive the French cleat hardware shown into your post. This would allow the frame to set flush or nearly flush with the wall. It could be difficult to find screws short enough for attaching the French cleat. But the pointed ends of the screws that secure the French cleat into the recess in the MDF back could be filed flush; preventing the point of the screw from piercing the picture mounted in the frame.

I am not sure how much success you could have by routing recesses into ¼” MDF. In this case flush mounting the screw/fender washer backer retainers and French cleat may be required.

- JBrow

I’ve actually already built a frame similar to this, but alot bigger. Found in my projects.

Anyways I did something similar to the washer idea, but used the things used for picture frames. I wasn’t that happy with how that turned out. You can also see how I routed out the top for the french cleats.

I like ur washer idea alot better

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

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JBrow

1273 posts in 754 days


#5 posted 02-17-2017 04:07 PM

trevor7428,

I accepted your invitation and looked at some of your projects; all very nicely done! I really liked the shadow box that honors the memory of your Grandfather; a real keepsake for you and future generations!

Since you are not particularly fond of the way the surface mount clips hold the MDF back in place, I think you could replace them with shop made recessed wooden clips as an alternative to fender washers. This is the method I like over the fender washer idea.

This alternative would require a length of 1/8” thick project wood about ¾” wide. This strip could be cut to length, thus harvesting the wooden clips. The wooden clips would fit into a routed recess in the frame and MDF. The routed recesses would be deep enough and wide enough so the wooden clips would set flush with the back face of the frame. The wooded clips would be set in the recess, overlapping the MDF back panel and be secured using a screw into the frame. If the screw hole in the wooden clips is countersunk, bugle head screws could be used. Pan head screws would work but could scratch the wall since the pan head screw could set proud of the frame, unless the recess is routed deep enough to allow the pan head screw to be recessed below the back face of the frame. If you go this way,make a few extra wooden clips in case one happens to crack when installed.

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