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Forum topic by SnowyRiver posted 09-21-2010 12:11 AM 1703 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


09-21-2010 12:11 AM

I have a question about beveling the edge of 3/4 walnut.

I am making a small base for a project (its 5 1/2 X 7”) and I want to bevel all four of the edges at 25 degrees. I think this would be a good job for a router table or shaper, but I have neither. In the plan that I have, it suggests a table saw with a left tilt blade and then run the piece through the saw against the saw fence on each of its four edges.

I tried this and it works OK, but I think its a bit scary with such a small piece. Any ideas on a better way to do this? Although I have a riving knife on the saw, I didnt want to get a kick-back.

Thanks

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN


14 replies so far

View BreakingBoardom's profile

BreakingBoardom

615 posts in 2548 days


#1 posted 09-21-2010 12:35 AM

Not sure if I’m understanding your question correctly, but if so then you could make a little sled that rides over the top of your fence and clamp the workpiece to that. Some tenoning jigs work in a similar way I think.

-- Matt - http://breakingboardom.wordpress.com/

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


#2 posted 09-21-2010 12:54 AM

Thanks Matt. I think I figured it out. I clamped a 3/4 inch thin strip of wood to the fence in front of the blade and another behind the blade. Then I clamped another 3/4 inch longer piece over the top of it to creat a slot over the blade. This holds the piece tight against the fence, protects my fingers and keeps the piece straight while cutting. Worked out great. If I get a minute I will post a pix…probably would make it clearer. I am always concerned when running a small piece through the blade and my fingers are just inches from the blade.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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BreakingBoardom

615 posts in 2548 days


#3 posted 09-21-2010 01:14 AM

Well, I’m glad you figured it out safely. Will look forward to seeing your solution and finished project.

-- Matt - http://breakingboardom.wordpress.com/

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


#4 posted 09-21-2010 01:46 AM

Matt…here is what I came up with.

Photobucket

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Here I added a shim to allow the piece to slide smoothly in the frame.

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Final product

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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Abbott

2570 posts in 2770 days


#5 posted 09-21-2010 01:58 AM

Hey Wayne what brand are those orange clamps and how well does the release mechanism work when they are being used (under a load)?

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4167 posts in 2323 days


#6 posted 09-21-2010 02:27 AM

well figured out. I don’t have a table saw so all my ideas were by hand.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View j_olsen's profile

j_olsen

155 posts in 2638 days


#7 posted 09-21-2010 02:50 AM

Wayne—just another idea—one that I have used is to make a sliding saddle jig with a high side that will slide over your fence and you can clamp to the high side thus not having all the stuff on both sides of the blade

-- Jeff - Bell Buckle, TN

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littlecope

3055 posts in 2969 days


#8 posted 09-21-2010 02:52 AM

Good Idea, Wayne!!
When I had to do this, I made a simple fence extensionhttp://lumberjocks.com/littlecope/blog/10974
It works fine, but is a little scary…
Your idea of a sort of “working slot” looks much safer… Thanks!!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


#9 posted 09-21-2010 04:33 AM

Thanks for all the comments everyone.

Abbott….the clamps are Jorgensen ISD clamps. I love them and use them a lot. They release well with just a touch of the button.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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Abbott

2570 posts in 2770 days


#10 posted 09-21-2010 06:01 PM

Thanks Wayne, I will look them up.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View BreakingBoardom's profile

BreakingBoardom

615 posts in 2548 days


#11 posted 09-22-2010 01:09 AM

Nice solution Wayne. Looks like you figured it out and got good results.

-- Matt - http://breakingboardom.wordpress.com/

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Gofor

470 posts in 3254 days


#12 posted 09-23-2010 03:09 AM

You have just proved that your mind is the best safety device you have. Difficult cut, small piece, and “it doesn’t feel safe to do”. Instead of just foolishly gutting through the cut, you came up with a great solution, which also probably increased the accuracy of the cut.

Great job!! and a great tip that I will file away for future reference. I will used that technique for making beveled raised panels in an upcoming project.

Thank You

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3115 days


#13 posted 09-23-2010 03:20 AM

it’s basically a raised panel isn’t it?

if the piece is too small to just run it against the fence, you can use a runner that will ride on top of your fence, and the piece will be clamped to it, that will give you something to hold onto

- OR -

you could move the fence to the left side of the blade, and use a tall aux fence that the blade will slightly cut into and run the piece against that with a push block.

- OR -

since this is a base and not a panel – you could also assemble it to your project, and once assembled run it against the beveled blade -you’ll have a larger surface to hold on to and a larger surface that will run on the TS top

- OR -

use a hand plane

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


#14 posted 09-23-2010 04:49 AM

Yes, PurpLev, it is like a raised panel. I like this website for all the great ideas. Sometimes when a person is doing something you lose track of the practical way to do it. Although the way I did it worked great, I think when I get a minute I’ll build a sled like you have suggested that will ride on the fence and just use a clamp to hold the piece down.

Thanks all !

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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