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Forum topic by Karda posted 02-14-2017 04:51 AM 674 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

814 posts in 390 days


02-14-2017 04:51 AM

when I get my lathe I will need to get a grinder to sharpen the tool, can you use a 6 ” grinder or do you need an 8”, the speeds are around 3400 rpms, is that to fast also HF has a professional HSS set of turning tools for 64.99 is that a good set, it is not the red handled set that is about 80.00 thanks Mike


35 replies so far

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TheFridge

8302 posts in 1323 days


#1 posted 02-14-2017 04:59 AM

8” is nice

Slow speed is preferable

White wheels are good

I have the same set and they are sufficient.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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BenDupre

531 posts in 325 days


#2 posted 02-14-2017 05:08 AM

Home Depot online has a 8 in slow speed grinder with the white wheels. Its branded Wen. It sells for about $80. I replaced my HF 6 in grinder. Kept burning the edge on the 3450 speed. The new one works much better and has a 1750 unloaded speed.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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wuddoc

233 posts in 3555 days


#3 posted 02-14-2017 05:29 AM

I agree with the other LJ’s on all points and if a grinder is what you need/want then go for it. There is an alternative to think about. Skip the grinder at HF for $54 & HF lathe tools for $65 and consider a set of rotating tip carbide lathe tool(s). This means no grinding, honing or setting correct bevel.

This is the grizzly page on those types of tools but you may find them at less cost somewhere else.

http://grizzly.com/catalog/2017/main/157?p=157

-- Wuddoc

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woodbutcherbynight

3645 posts in 2246 days


#4 posted 02-14-2017 05:39 AM

I bought a Tormek many years ago, expensive but worth it to me and many chisels have been sharpened with it over the years. Now we could get all kinds of drama started saying it is the best but Grizzly has something that is much cheaper that may work like the Tormek.
Link for Tormek
Link for Grizzly Version

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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MrUnix

6000 posts in 2036 days


#5 posted 02-14-2017 06:18 AM

I’ll throw in another alternative. A belt sander will serve double duty – you can sharpen all your chisels and lathe tools on it, as well as actually use it as a sander for your woodworking projects :) For about $50 you can get a belt/disc sander from HF, or even cheaper on the used market if you keep your eye out for one. I have several grinders in the shop, and the only time I use them for woodturning tools is when I want to grind a completely new profile on one of them, which requires removing a lot of metal. The rest of the time, all sharpening is done on the belt sander.

A dedicated sharpening system may make sense in a professional shop, or where a lot of production work is being done constantly… but for the average woodturner in a home shop environment, not so much IMHO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Karda

814 posts in 390 days


#6 posted 02-14-2017 06:43 AM

I have been considering carbide tools what are the minimum tools I would need to get started. I looked at the grinder, it is a nice one. can you use the sharpening jigs with it

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Karda

814 posts in 390 days


#7 posted 02-14-2017 07:20 AM

I haven’t thought of a belt sander, can you get very fine belts for them. I ll take a look at them thanks

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BenDupre

531 posts in 325 days


#8 posted 02-14-2017 12:34 PM



I have been considering carbide tools what are the minimum tools I would need to get started. I looked at the grinder, it is a nice one. can you use the sharpening jigs with it

- Karda

If you want to try carbide tools look at rockler. They have a set of three “mini” carbides which they sell for $189 however if you are patient they go on sale for $99. I watched this happen twice and the second time i jumped on it. Later i added a fourth tool the SR1 which is a small portion of a 2 in radius. So far i have learned i can do a lot with the carbides and i love them but i still use my other tools frequently. I probably need more technique and prractice but i still find it easuer to rough with a roughing gouge and roll beads with gouge. The carbides are really good for scraping cuts. I sometimes do my final passes with them to smooth things out.

Good luck!

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1424 posts in 1826 days


#9 posted 02-14-2017 01:29 PM

If you want to try carbide make your own tools, provided you have general shop experience. I have some listed in my projects, and under reviews are Capn Eddies inserts. I dont recommend carbide – hss is much sharper and works better once you learn how to sharpen and use tools.

For sharpening a 6” grinder can work, but the thinner wheels are a challenge. The WEN 8” would be my choice. Problem with belt sander is having the right belt on when needed – for sanding or sharpening, and you will need to rig up a way to use a jig.

I can verify the red handled HF tools are good for spindle use (the scrapers are a bit thin), I still use the spindle gouges and skews. Take a look at Benjamins Best tools – a bit more $ vs HF but worth it. Set of spindle gouges, 1” skew, diamond parting tool, set of bowl gouges if you plan to make any, and their ultimate scraping tool is pretty good after you grind/sharpen the hss inserts.

Next is work holding. PSI has good drive and live centers, as well as Barracuda scroll chucks. A spindle tap and glue blocks can be used vs a chuck.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7658 posts in 2751 days


#10 posted 02-14-2017 01:45 PM



I ll throw in another alternative. A belt sander will serve double duty – you can sharpen all your chisels and lathe tools on it, as well as actually use it as a sander for your woodworking projects :) For about $50 you can get a belt/disc sander from HF, or even cheaper on the used market if you keep your eye out for one. I have several grinders in the shop, and the only time I use them for woodturning tools is when I want to grind a completely new profile on one of them, which requires removing a lot of metal. The rest of the time, all sharpening is done on the belt sander.
A dedicated sharpening system may make sense in a professional shop, or where a lot of production work is being done constantly… but for the average woodturner in a home shop environment, not so much IMHO.
Cheers,
Brad
- MrUnix

And here is how to convert the HF sander to the above:
http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3179

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Karda

814 posts in 390 days


#11 posted 02-14-2017 05:49 PM

this is a bit overwhelming. Good as carbide sound I have more faith in good steel blades just not my sharpening skills but that can change. My grinder is a throw together but it works at least it did till I buggered the threads on the arbor shaft trying to change threads know what to do there.

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BenDupre

531 posts in 325 days


#12 posted 02-14-2017 05:52 PM

Learning to turn = learning to sharpen. Dull tools = dangerous tools. I am still learning.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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Karda

814 posts in 390 days


#13 posted 02-14-2017 06:31 PM

Mike I looked at the sander option and conversion I think I might go that way if I can’t fix my grinder. It is a throw together but it works and it is slower, 1140 RPM motor. but I buggered the threads on the arbor shaft here are pics of it

View RichCMD's profile

RichCMD

391 posts in 1778 days


#14 posted 02-14-2017 06:42 PM

I have both HSS tools and carbide tools. They do not cut the same way, and they are not used the same way. I do most of my turning with the HSS tools. However, of late I find myself mostly using the carbide when I am turning pens.

I started with a slow speed grinder with white wheels, and then last year I upgraded to CBN wheels. They were pricey, but I love them. I also have the Oneway Vari-Grind jig and the Raptor Set Up Tools. This set up gives me repeatability, which helps a lot in building the muscle memory for using a tool.

The basics for HSS would probably be a roughing gouge, a spindle gouge, a bowl gouge, and a parting tool. A minimum set of carbide tools would probably have a square cutter, a round cutter, maybe a detail cutter, and a parting tool. A full face shield and a dust mask are also pretty much essential items.

-- Ride the bevel!

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LeeMills

459 posts in 1138 days


#15 posted 02-14-2017 06:43 PM

I can’t tell from the pics if the arbor is one piece or in sections. If it is in sections you may just need new “ends” such as this.
http://www.wttool.com/index/page/product/product_id/71/category_id/13079/product_name/RDX+Motor+Work+Arbors

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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