LumberJocks

I've come across an old repair during sanding of an oak chair. What to do?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Prizen posted 02-13-2017 08:11 PM 1572 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Prizen's profile

Prizen

31 posts in 1758 days


02-13-2017 08:11 PM

Hey all

In the middle of sanding down oak kitchen chairs and came across this repair. Is it OK as is? Plan is to re stain in a new color.


9 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4805 posts in 3798 days


#1 posted 02-13-2017 08:13 PM

What repair? I can’t see a thing. :)
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Prizen's profile

Prizen

31 posts in 1758 days


#2 posted 02-13-2017 08:39 PM



What repair? I can t see a thing. :)
Bill

- Bill White

Great, leave as-is then! I guess!?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8323 posts in 1324 days


#3 posted 02-13-2017 08:59 PM



What repair? I can t see a thing. :)
Bill

- Bill White

Ditto

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

805 posts in 1279 days


#4 posted 02-14-2017 08:08 AM

Leave it, but it may not take the stain well. Expect to touch up the repair with some extra color.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#5 posted 02-14-2017 09:16 AM

I will agree with everyone else if….... you take a fine point something and see if the repair material is rock hard or at all soft. If hard, go for it. If the repair material is soft it is some kind putty or glue and that will be a possible break point for that chair. If soft, you could dig out the repair material completely, including a little of the surrounding wood that is saturated by that material, and then repair with a good epoxy. I would cut out a piece of the chair leg and fit a new piece of Oak back into place. Then refinish the set of chairs. I can’t tell by that picture, the actual location of the repair on the chair. But when Uncle Bob finishes his big dinner and stretches against the back of his chair, you don’t want to have to start all over on the repair after picking his fat butt up off the floor! Just my thoughts, but you decide.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1318 days


#6 posted 02-14-2017 02:29 PM

Sorry but I’m going to disagree with the others here.

If it is fixated with a screw ok, but if its simply glued (you sure that isn’t bondo?) it will not be a good repair going forward.

To properly fix a break like that you would remove material past the crack to good wood and dutchman a new piece of oak in place. It will be stronger and much easier to finish.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2640 posts in 2010 days


#7 posted 02-14-2017 02:37 PM

Is that actually a break or is it just an opening in the knot? It looks like it is just filler in an opening and shouldn’t affect anything.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View McFly's profile

McFly

270 posts in 865 days


#8 posted 02-14-2017 03:47 PM



Is that actually a break or is it just an opening in the knot? It looks like it is just filler in an opening and shouldn t affect anything.

- johnstoneb

That’s what I’m seeing here – a knot that didn’t quite make it. If that’s a hard plastic wood type filler, you should be good to go, just know that this is definitely a weak point that could fail in the future.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8323 posts in 1324 days


#9 posted 02-14-2017 05:40 PM

I thought a knot. It wouldn’t hurt anything to cut it out and put another piece of oak in.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com