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Gluing Dyed Moldings

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Forum topic by Quailguy posted 02-13-2017 05:46 PM 363 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Quailguy

56 posts in 1189 days


02-13-2017 05:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m working on the design of a jewelry box for my granddaughter using birdseye maple. I would like to color the edge moldings around the base and lid, and possibly the drawer pulls. Unless I hear otherwise, my initial choice would be TransTint dye, either water or alcohol based.

Here are my questions/concerns:

1. The molding will be made separate from the panels, will I be able to edge glue the dyed pieces to the panels?

2. Will the dye bleed to the adjoining surfaces?

3. What precautions can I take to make it work?

Thanks in advance to all who know more than I

Mike


7 replies so far

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Kirk650

524 posts in 746 days


#1 posted 02-13-2017 06:01 PM

I just finished two jewelry boxes, and both had trim moulding. I glue it and use a 23 gauge pin nailer to hold the trim in place. Works great unless you have the air pressure too low and don’t sink the pins below the surface of the trim. And in case you do that, as I have, a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel works great to trim off the exposed end of the pin.

I use mostly Transtint dye in water, since I can blend color better with water than with alcohol (maybe others are better with Transtint in alcohol). I haven’t had any issues with dye bleeding to undyed wood, once the dyed wood has dried. Still, I use a lot of test pieces to avoid surprises.

You might have some blotching with the dye on Maple, so test that on scrap also. You might need a blotch controller.

Kirk

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Quailguy

56 posts in 1189 days


#2 posted 02-13-2017 06:13 PM

Thanks! I don’t have a pin nailer that small (good excuse to buy one). The anti-splotch is a good idea. It is not mandatory that the figure shows through the stain as it is going to minimal and only as a highlight. I’ll make several test pieces to see what works.
Thanks again
MIke

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Quailguy

56 posts in 1189 days


#3 posted 02-13-2017 06:20 PM

So this brings up another question; I’m looking at a reddish color for the molding (to match her school colors). Purple Heart could work if I could keep it from darkening with age. Is that possible?

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TheFridge

9463 posts in 1484 days


#4 posted 02-13-2017 06:30 PM

African padauk is pretty red. Working it is about the same as purpleheart.

I just made a jewelry box for my daughter with a small crown edge glued around the top. It didn’t last a week. I’m glad I glued it as I just had splintering to deal with.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Kirk650

524 posts in 746 days


#5 posted 02-13-2017 08:30 PM

If you want red, I’ll suggest Bloodwood (aka Satine). It has a rather wide range in coloration, so you’d need to pick the board you want. Note that it’s very hard. I’ve done some turnings with it, and a couple of cutting boards. Lovely wood.

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Kazooman

1006 posts in 1950 days


#6 posted 02-13-2017 09:11 PM

For a real bright red try red heart.

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Quailguy

56 posts in 1189 days


#7 posted 02-13-2017 09:31 PM

Thanks everyone, I now have several new angles to consider. And I thought this was going to be easy…

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