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Need design help for a lazy susan

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Forum topic by JimRochester posted 02-12-2017 02:11 PM 559 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JimRochester

491 posts in 1451 days


02-12-2017 02:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip

I have a customer with a teak patio table and she wants a matching 28” diameter lazy susan made of teak. I told her I would not have the time, nor would she want to pay the cost of an exact duplicate. Those end pieces would create a lot of waste and I’m paying $37 bd. ft. through my supplier.

I was wondering if anyone had any ideas about a complimentary design that would still be a simpler build? So far I’ve thought about gluing up spacers in between the boards to create slats or do a solid piece and route and ink grooves to create the appearance of slats.

I am trying to get inventory ready for show season and am regretting agreeing to do this. Any ideas would be appreciated.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.


11 replies so far

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splintergroup

1699 posts in 1059 days


#1 posted 02-12-2017 03:27 PM

I think you are rather pinned in to the design and need to keep the slats vs. ink grooves. Is this exposed to weather (i.e. will it get wet)? If protected you might talk her into alternative materials or if you added more segments (a pain in general), you would eliminate some of the wasted wood. Alternatively you could inquire about making a polygon instead of a circle.

I was buying some Jatoba unfinished flooring from “Lumber Liquidators” as it works out to about $5/bf for some wiry nice 3-5” wide strips. I had noticed on their white board a list of excess stock that they were basically dumping. There was two bundles of unfinished teak (about 50 bf) for about $4/bf. It was already taken (sniff…) or I would have snapped that up quick!

Long story short, I’ve found the hardware flooring market is a great source for very inexpensive unfinished exotics. You end up with 5/8” thick pieces after planing away the relief grooves, but there is plenty of projects that don’t need 3/4”+ stock

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JimRochester

491 posts in 1451 days


#2 posted 02-12-2017 04:00 PM

I believe it is going to spend some time outside, and believe me I spent a lot of time trying to talk her out of teak. The liquidated flooring is a great idea but I unfortunately already picked up the wood. In the future though, 5/8 is typically fine for a lazy susan since they don’t actually have to support anything but ketchup.

To avoid the segment at the end I was thinking of putting 1/4 spacers between 2” slats on the glue up. Short in the middle and growing longer at the outside edges. If I calculate correctly I should end up with about 2” of contact all the way around giving the appearance of an out side circle. This will give her the true slats she’s looking for while avoiding the segments end caps all the way around.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View EngineerChic's profile

EngineerChic

34 posts in 341 days


#3 posted 02-12-2017 04:18 PM

This may not be helpful but … What about a strip of stainless steel edging to give it a slightly raised lip and band the edges?

This occurred to me because I have a tripod for cooking over the firepit outside and it has a band of stainless attached to the round cooking grate. It’s smart in that application because you don’t want food sliding off into the fire. Here you’d have to find a way to attach the metal banding to the boards but I think that’s doable. If stainless isn’t a good color for her, thick copper or even some brass might work.

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Mr M's Woodshop

418 posts in 2904 days


#4 posted 02-12-2017 04:46 PM

This is a Lazy Susan. Why glue it up with spacers?

Run battens across the bottom, and glue the top to those battens with the required spacing. Might be wise to glue & screw it. Attach your bearing to the battens.

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

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JimRochester

491 posts in 1451 days


#5 posted 02-12-2017 07:19 PM



This may not be helpful but … What about a strip of stainless steel edging to give it a slightly raised lip and band the edges?

This occurred to me because I have a tripod for cooking over the firepit outside and it has a band of stainless attached to the round cooking grate. It s smart in that application because you don t want food sliding off into the fire. Here you d have to find a way to attach the metal banding to the boards but I think that s doable. If stainless isn t a good color for her, thick copper or even some brass might work.

- EngineerChic

Interesting idea. It will be worth running it by her.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

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JimRochester

491 posts in 1451 days


#6 posted 02-12-2017 07:21 PM



This is a Lazy Susan. Why glue it up with spacers?

Run battens across the bottom, and glue the top to those battens with the required spacing. Might be wise to glue & screw it. Attach your bearing to the battens.

- Mr M s Woodshop

Henry, if I understand you correctly, you are suggesting the individual slats held by cross braces underneath and nothing on the ends? Do I run the risk of those ends warping if there is no side to side support?

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1520 posts in 3395 days


#7 posted 02-13-2017 05:18 PM

Hey Jim,

Check out your local marine supplier. They have pre-cut pieces of teak for boat projects. You might be able to buy a lot of the stuff off the shelf and just do a glue-up.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Roger Gaborski's profile

Roger Gaborski

243 posts in 3585 days


#8 posted 02-15-2017 01:38 AM

Jim,

Here is my suggestion. Glue up a 29” square (maybe with the corners cut off). Then on your CNC machine cut the slots using the Profile toolpath – BUT – every so many inches leave the wood solid for about an inch. This would simulate the slots between the strips (but you would still have only one piece of wood). On the ends leave enough solid wood to allow you to cut the outside circular piece. You might want to cut the solid regions of the slots with a 1/4” deep cut to help with the illusion they are individual strips of wood.
Jim, this probably isn’t very clear, so give me a call if you want to.
Also, 29” is probably too wide for the CNC so you made have to cut two half circles, then join them together.
The key point is you never cut the wood completely, so you don’t have to glue individual strips (except for the potential two half circles).

Roger _

-- Roger Gaborski, http://www.rogergaborski.com

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

491 posts in 1451 days


#9 posted 02-15-2017 11:00 AM



Jim,

Here is my suggestion. Glue up a 29” square (maybe with the corners cut off). Then on your CNC machine cut the slots using the Profile toolpath – BUT – every so many inches leave the wood solid for about an inch. This would simulate the slots between the strips (but you would still have only one piece of wood). On the ends leave enough solid wood to allow you to cut the outside circular piece. You might want to cut the solid regions of the slots with a 1/4” deep cut to help with the illusion they are individual strips of wood.
Jim, this probably isn t very clear, so give me a call if you want to.
Also, 29” is probably too wide for the CNC so you made have to cut two half circles, then join them together.
The key point is you never cut the wood completely, so you don t have to glue individual strips (except for the potential two half circles).

Roger _

- Roger Gaborski

Yeah, that’s way too big for my machine. I only have about 24. I briefly thought about doing halves but got intimidated. But that’s probably not a bad idea. I could even enhance the final assembly with some pocket screws. Maybe this weekend I’ll start to play with the design and will give you a call after I FUBAR it.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View Roger Gaborski's profile

Roger Gaborski

243 posts in 3585 days


#10 posted 02-15-2017 01:57 PM

Jim,
Here’s a simulated image from Aspire. You would probably have to do this in two sections to fit your machine. I’m not sure how to attach the program, so I’ll send it separately.
Hope this helps,
Roger

-- Roger Gaborski, http://www.rogergaborski.com

View Lee's profile

Lee

95 posts in 715 days


#11 posted 02-17-2017 12:25 AM

How about this idea, cut 32 short segments 2 13/16 long and 2 5/16 wide at an angle of 5.625 deg. This is going to give you nearly a complete circle 2 inches wide, then use a shop made template and router to trim it to a circle. This has the advantage of utilizing pieces of scrap you rip to 2 5/16 wide. Then rout a dado in the under side of the circle and matching dado’s in the slats to lock in the ends of the slats. Here is a web site to calculate any circle and the corresponding segments you need.

http://marleyturned.com/scripts/Segment_Calc_V5/SegcalcV5.php?name=Untitled&RingNumber=1&RingHeight=3%2F4&width=2&OD=28&segments=32&comp=1%2F8&kerf=1%2F8&grainmatch=Grain+Matching&display=Fractions&Comments=&WoodSpecies=&WoodSpeciesADD=&PriceBFADD=&submitBtnSEG=Calculate

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

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