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Need help figuring out a soultion to dust in my basement

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Forum topic by thomasfurman posted 02-09-2017 03:48 PM 660 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thomasfurman

22 posts in 334 days


02-09-2017 03:48 PM

My workshop is in my basement (sigh)...it’s grown to the point where I NEED to figure out a way to minimize dust. Right now I’m doing the ‘ol run a shopvac near the tool while I cut then sweep the floor plan.

I don’t mind spending a few hundred…something like a HF system or one of those ceiling mounted collectors…I’m not sure the best way to hook up the hoses and elbows so I’m not tripping over stuff.

Here is a rough layout…everything is on wheels so I can easily rearrange if need be. Any tips/suggestions?


15 replies so far

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EugdOT

213 posts in 392 days


#1 posted 02-09-2017 04:07 PM

I can’t help on the layout but will highly recommend getting both a dust collection system and a air cleaner system especially in the basement because fine dust is what can cause health issues for you and your family. If you are cutting plywood or mdf products fine dust will travel throughout the house every time you open the door it will cause a vacuum effect and pull dust everywhere. If you ever did any drywall sanding, even a little area the dust goes everywhere in the room. Just my 2 cents…

Also if it’s a small area you can always use the rockler dust right system direct connect, and connect right to the tool to minimize ductwork throughout the basement. I do it in my garage and it’s 20×20 space. Works great for me.

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thomasfurman

22 posts in 334 days


#2 posted 02-09-2017 04:43 PM


I can t help on the layout but will highly recommend getting both a dust collection system and a air cleaner system especially in the basement because fine dust is what can cause health issues for you and your family. If you are cutting plywood or mdf products fine dust will travel throughout the house every time you open the door it will cause a vacuum effect and pull dust everywhere. If you ever did any drywall sanding, even a little area the dust goes everywhere in the room. Just my 2 cents…

Also if it s a small area you can always use the rockler dust right system direct connect, and connect right to the tool to minimize ductwork throughout the basement. I do it in my garage and it s 20×20 space. Works great for me.

- EugdOT

wow never seen the dust right system before…is it really any difference than the HF system though? They have the exact same CCF and can both be wall mounted….my one question is how do you neatly coil up the 4” hose? I’d need a 18’ run approx.

I like the idea of having 4” ports (or hoods) on all my tools and then just plugging in the dust right (or HF) before I turn it on. I’m not using my shop enough to warrant permanent piping.

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EugdOT

213 posts in 392 days


#3 posted 02-09-2017 04:54 PM

http://www.rockler.com/rockler-dust-right-quick-fit-multi-port-tool-set

http://www.rockler.com/rockler-4-diameter-dust-right-expandable-hose

It’s a add on to the house dust collection system instead of the ducting you get a long 4 inch hose that can stretch from the hf to machine. with most basements have low ceilings which is clutter with ducting, and instead involved in the in a air cleaner to go with the hf.

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Matt

159 posts in 788 days


#4 posted 02-09-2017 05:27 PM

Hey Thomas,

We’re in the same boat – Basement shop, no permanent (Hard) DC lines, etc. My shop is mostly on mobile bases, with the TS and mitersaw having dedicated lines (and blast gates) and the remainder of the tools have a “nest” on the one wall coming out to play when needed. I run a 4” diameter peachtree flex hose to the mobile(ish) tools when they are in use and try not to trip over the hose while I’m moving around it. It’s not perfect, but it does work pretty well. My TS and chop saw have their own lines (The chop saw is right next to the cyclone) and the TS is just easier to have it’s own line vs bending over every time to use it, and it’s used all the time directly before/after jointer/planer operations, saving a bunch of time not having to move the hose between all three machines.

I’ve got a 1.5HP Laguna Cyclone and that works great – when only using one tool at time and when all the blast gates are closed on the machines not in use. I also have a cheapie airfilter (Powertec I picked up at amazon for ~$130) hanging from the floor joists that, honestly scares me a bit with all the crap that it picks up. I would recommend doing permanent lines (hard or soft, soft is easier) to the tools that don’t move – i.e. table saw and chop saw and moving a soft line between the other tools, keeping it capped when not in use. There are some pics of my shop in “my workshop” that might help. I will say this – buy the biggest Dust collector your shop can support powerwise, and budget wise. We plan on moving this year and the first thing I’ll be doing in my new dedicated detached shop is dust collection, and I’m guessing I’m going at least 3HP, maybe 5HP this time with massive 6” runs.

-- My "projects" always look better with beer goggles.

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thomasfurman

22 posts in 334 days


#5 posted 02-09-2017 07:06 PM



http://www.rockler.com/rockler-dust-right-quick-fit-multi-port-tool-set

http://www.rockler.com/rockler-4-diameter-dust-right-expandable-hose

It s a add on to the house dust collection system instead of the ducting you get a long 4 inch hose that can stretch from the hf to machine. with most basements have low ceilings which is clutter with ducting, and instead involved in the in a air cleaner to go with the hf.

- EugdOT

awesome…I think that might be the way ill have to go. get a wall-mounted dust collector (with my budget probably the smaller HF unit), hook up the dust right 4” ports to all my machines, get a 20” flexy hose that can retract when not in use and just connect it to each tool as I go.

Now my last question (probably not though) my band saw is an OLD delta monster with no port…should I just get a hood and put it next to the saw when in use?

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William Shelley

479 posts in 1307 days


#6 posted 02-09-2017 07:09 PM


Now my last question (probably not though) my band saw is an OLD delta monster with no port…should I just get a hood and put it next to the saw when in use?

- thomasfurman

Bandsaws spit their dust out under the table so you ideally want the suction right under where the blade passes through the table.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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EugdOT

213 posts in 392 days


#7 posted 02-09-2017 07:15 PM

Some people either cut a 4 inch port on the bottom tier area of the bandsaw or mount a shop vac hose port under the table close to the blade . Look around see what is best for you.

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MrStyle

82 posts in 1567 days


#8 posted 02-09-2017 07:28 PM

I believe you are doomed. The “wife’s crap” section is too close and too large for any dust collection system to protect.

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thomasfurman

22 posts in 334 days


#9 posted 02-09-2017 07:30 PM

thanks guys…this is going to be way simpler than I thought. that dust right “start pack” has pretty much everything I need. I only need to buy an additional 2.5” port and a large hood. if I ever feel the need I might run dedicated lines to some machines but I’m not in the shop THAT much.

one more question…how “stretchy” are the stretchy hoses…like if I unhook it from the machine will it shrink itself back up or do I have to “help” it…just wondering how to store it all neatly when not in use.

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EugdOT

213 posts in 392 days


#10 posted 02-09-2017 07:35 PM

I have old hose does not have a lot of bounce back especially over time you can find videos on YouTube for the people who use the New rockler has a channel it should help make up your mind

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thomasfurman

22 posts in 334 days


#11 posted 02-09-2017 08:01 PM

since my table saw has a micron bag mounted underneath, would I be better off getting a hood and mounting it above the saw? That’s where I see most of my fine dust when cutting…

again sorry for all the questions I swear I’m not this dumb in real life!

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EugdOT

213 posts in 392 days


#12 posted 02-09-2017 08:46 PM

Not sure what you mean by hood? But bandsaws pull chips and dust downward following the front of the blade.

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jmos

797 posts in 2207 days


#13 posted 02-09-2017 09:03 PM

The first thing I did in my basement shop was build a wall between my shop and the rest of the basement. I used 2/4’s at around 24” on center and used cheap 3/8” construction grade plywood to sheath the outside. I used spray-foam insulation to seal all the cracks. Then I made sure every HVAC duct in the shop portion of the basement was well sealed. I don’t have any registers or returns in the shop, so it is isolated from the house HVAC. With all that, I don’t have any sawdust in the other part of the basement or in the rest of the house. (I also have small kids and it keeps them out.) Something to think about if you want to contain the sawdust in your shop area.

I started off using a PM dust collector (with upgraded filter) that I rolled to each tool, as well as an overhead air cleaner. That worked pretty well. I think you’ll be good with moving the hose from tool to tool. I would look into the micron rating of the bag/filter on the dust collector your considering, if it’s too coarse it will just blow the finest particles, which are the worst health wise, back into the air. For your tablesaw, I would recommend trying to catch the sawdust and funnel it to the dust collection hose, rather than rely on the bag.

A few years later my Wife, who’s a Doc, talked to a pulmonologist colleague who scared the hell out of her with how bad fine wood dust can be. After that I got a 5hp cyclone and hard-piped dust system.

With that, I still wear a respirator on occasion, usually when I’d doing a lot of sanding.

-- John

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EugdOT

213 posts in 392 days


#14 posted 02-10-2017 01:38 PM

I saw this about the bandsaw may be it can help
https://youtu.be/Ut_tqnqrRww

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ArtMann

686 posts in 653 days


#15 posted 02-12-2017 03:16 AM

The Dust Right and the Harbor Freight wall hung dust collectors have a woefully inadequate filter bag. They really should be called shaving collectors. You need a filter that captures at least down to 1 micron particle size with 99% efficiency.The Rockler filter bag captures 30 micron particles and up. These units unmodified will help you reduce the amount of shavings and sawdust on the floor but will not protect your lungs against fine dust.

My opinion of the shop air filters is they aren’t worth much. One study I saw determined that the particulates in the air were filtered down to safe levels 30 minutes after the machines stopped working, even though the air filter ran all the time. What that means is your filter and your lungs are filtering at the same time. I think the only really effective way to cut down on the dust in the air for health reasons is to intercept the dust at the source.

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