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Forum topic by rbterhune posted 09-16-2010 10:29 PM 844 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rbterhune

171 posts in 1877 days


09-16-2010 10:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining design arts and crafts

I’m a new woodworker who’s been working on some shop oriented projects this past year. I hope to be ready for my first furniture project this fall/winter. The project I’ll be doing is a nightstand previously built and shown here by Gizmodyne.

The plans are from “More Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture” and here is Gizmodyne’s original post of the nightstands:

Click for details: L. & J.G. Stickley No. 110 Nightstand Reproductions

My question is this: The original plans call for a tongue and groove type application for the frame and panel construction of the sides. These sides, however, serve as the primary structure for the piece and include the legs. Would it be worthwhile to mortise and tenon the rails to the stiles (with stopped grooves for the panel) rather than cut through-grooves into the stiles? In other words, is there a structural gain by stopping the groove in a mortise and tenon?

Note: The stiles are 13/16” thick x 3 wide. The rails are over 5” wide.

Thanks,
Brad


7 replies so far

View Greedo's profile

Greedo

468 posts in 1616 days


#1 posted 09-16-2010 11:43 PM

you could go for tenon and mortise, but on this particular project tongue and groove would be more easy and more than solid enough i believe. if the rails were less wide then it may be advised to go for tenons.

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rbterhune

171 posts in 1877 days


#2 posted 09-17-2010 01:37 AM

That is true…with the rail width I’d probably need a double tenon.

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1639 days


#3 posted 09-17-2010 10:10 PM

With the rails being 5” wide I would be more concerned with wood movement causing splitting with a double mortise and tenon joint. Where as with the tongue and groove method you are able to glue the rails to allow for wood movement to avoid splitting.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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rbterhune

171 posts in 1877 days


#4 posted 09-17-2010 10:25 PM

Greg…you bring up another good point with the glue. Should I apply glue to the entire length of the stub tenon in the groove or just part it to allow for movement? Remember, I’m new. Ha!

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Gregn

1642 posts in 1639 days


#5 posted 09-17-2010 11:16 PM

I would glue in the tongue about a 1/3 of the width or so of the stub tenon (tongue) to allow for movement.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View Blake's profile

Blake

3437 posts in 2530 days


#6 posted 09-18-2010 06:39 AM

Why don’t you ask gizmodyne?

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

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rbterhune

171 posts in 1877 days


#7 posted 09-18-2010 05:03 PM

I sent gizmodyne a message a few months back about some of the joinery, I suppose that wouldn’t be a bad idea this time either. Funny how I didn’t even think to do it again. I’ll send him a note.

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