LumberJocks

How do you glue up panels

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Josh posted 1410 days ago 1224 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Josh's profile

Josh

99 posts in 1623 days


1410 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question trick joining

I tried a couple weeks ago to use some of the thinner stock I had to make a panel that I would use for the bottom of a drawer or for the face on a saw stand cabinet. I ripped the pieces on the TS to make sure they were straight and then used a brush to put glue on the sides, clamped them together and let them chill for a day.

When I took the clamps off it looked fine but then I kind of put pressure on the outsides to see how strong it was and it didn’t hold so well. The wood was about 3/8” thick. Does it need to be thicker to glue up a panel and have it hold? Is there some trick I don’t know about?

-- Josh, South Jordan Utah


8 replies so far

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2697 posts in 1887 days


#1 posted 1410 days ago

You should be able to easily glue up 3/8” thick material. Make sure you stock is milled perfectly straight and the seam fits with no gaps. Guitar makers glue up much thinner stock all the time with great success.

What kind of glue did you use?

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View Josh's profile

Josh

99 posts in 1623 days


#2 posted 1410 days ago

Titebond original wood glue. The only thing I can think of is that maybe I didn’t mill them perfectly straight. But that’s why I’m asking, just to see if there is a step I’m missing.

-- Josh, South Jordan Utah

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1892 days


#3 posted 1410 days ago

We might be able to give you a better diagnosis if you can clarify what you mean by “pressure on the outsides” and “didn’t hold so well”.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View TominTexas's profile

TominTexas

42 posts in 1437 days


#4 posted 1410 days ago

A thickness of 3/8” shouldn’t be a problem for a glued up panel. Your edges must be flat and mate together without gaps – this should be checked as a dry fit while applying some clamping pressure. With fresh titebond glue the resulting bond should be strong with even thinner material. Did you get some glue squeeze out when you applied clamping pressure?

Tom

-- East Side of Big D

View Josh's profile

Josh

99 posts in 1623 days


#5 posted 1410 days ago

pressure on the outside would mean I held the panel in my hands and gave it a little bend. The panel was only 10” across but had about 7 pieces glued together to make that 10”

didn’t hold so well means that I could visibly see where two of the pieces were coming apart. Like there wasn’t enough glue holding them together but I’m almost sure there was because I can see where I wiped off squeeze out.

-- Josh, South Jordan Utah

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1892 days


#6 posted 1410 days ago

Okay, wood is inherently weak in bending that direction (notice how karate board breakers hold their boards), but it does sound like you had gaps. If it’s only between those 2 pieces, you can rip the panel apart at that seam and glue up the 2 halves again.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View Greedo's profile

Greedo

465 posts in 1562 days


#7 posted 1410 days ago

if glued properly then the glued joint is stronger than the wood itself, has the panel broken exactly where it was glued?
when i resaw a glued panel to size i test the strength by trying to break to cutoffs, they usually snap close to the joint, but not exactly the joint itself unless there wasn’t enough glue

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1585 days


#8 posted 1409 days ago

Be sure to alternate the growth rings then you should be able to put the 2 or 3 pieces together without any pressure to be sure you have a good straight glue line with no gaps. Then glue your edges and clamp together with enough pressure for a even amount of squeeze out along the joint. Make sure your glue is fresh and not out dated as well. After they dry remove clamps and scrape off excess glue. Thats what I do and have had no problems.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase