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Craftsman radial arm saw

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Forum topic by Serg84 posted 02-08-2017 08:27 PM 491 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Serg84

10 posts in 312 days


02-08-2017 08:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman digital radial arm saw

For some odd reason I can’t seem to square my radial arm saw that I bought used a couple months ago didn’t get a chance to use it due to not enough space at my old house but now that I have an actuall shop I have used it however I have spent hours and have made multiple test cuts on and still am left with a beveled cut. I already placed a new table top on it and the blade was square to the table. The miter cut comes out square with the fence but there is still a slight bevel in the cut. I’m thinking it might actually be my blade that might be slightly bent which doesn’t look bent at all? Any thoughts? Please help out!


7 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

910 posts in 1400 days


#1 posted 02-08-2017 09:17 PM

Do you have both the swivel and tilt locks locked tight? Are you squaring the blade tilt with a square or are you going by the degree gauge?

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Serg84

10 posts in 312 days


#2 posted 02-08-2017 09:20 PM

Yes they are both locked tight and I have used both a framing square and a digital angle finder gauge (separate from the saw)and still no luck. I don’t trust the digital part of the saw so I just discontinued it.


Do you have both the swivel and tilt locks locked tight? Are you squaring the blade tilt with a square or are you going by the degree gauge?

- WhyMe


View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4480 posts in 2190 days


#3 posted 02-08-2017 10:07 PM

Get the owners manual and follow the set up procedure exactly. I have one of these and I use it for right angle cuts only. The problem with mine is once you move the arm then you have have go through the whole set up process in order to get straight cuts. They were designed for construction carpentry, if you want precision don’t move the arm once you tune it.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Serg84

10 posts in 312 days


#4 posted 02-08-2017 10:11 PM

Thanks for that. I already requested a PDF version of the manual online!


Get the owners manual and follow the set up procedure exactly. I have one of these and I use it for right angle cuts only. The problem with mine is once you move the arm then you have have go through the whole set up process in order to get straight cuts. They were designed for construction carpentry, if you want precision don t move the arm once you tune it.

- bondogaposis


View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#5 posted 02-09-2017 03:09 AM

Serg84,

I think you might be correct; it is the blade. Last year I tried using the included Craftsman blade to dial in the radial saw’s settings. I could get it close but not just right. It was only when I replaced the Craftsman blade with the Forrest Woodworker II blade that I achieved success.

I also agree with bondogaposis. Follow the manual carefully. I also keep mine set at 90 degrees and do not adjust the carriage for bevel or mitre crosscuts unless there is absolutely no other way. For 45 degree mitre cuts, I made a 45 degree triangular fence that sets against the saw’s fence. For other mitre cuts, I clamp a straight edge to the radial saw table at the correct angle or use the table saw. I use the table saw for bevel cuts unless that is not possible, in which case I use the radial saw and spend some time re-setting the saw back to 90 after cutting the bevel.

View saltfly's profile

saltfly

81 posts in 339 days


#6 posted 02-09-2017 03:46 AM

Their are a number of differnt models of their radial arm saw. But they all have that same problem. The first thing I did after setting up my saw per the book , was to put a good blade on it. But you will still get ruff cuts. This is a perfect time to use the old with the new. I made a number of shooting boards. After I make a ruff cut that is always a little full. I put it on a shooting board and fine tune the cut with a plane. Some times using old tools with new ones is the way to go. Just a sugestion.

View dgapilot's profile

dgapilot

4 posts in 310 days


#7 posted 02-09-2017 05:26 PM

Get a copy of John Eakes book “Fine Tuning your Radial Arm Saw”. While not Craftsman related, to really learn how to use your Radial Arm Saw, get Wally Kunkles book “Mr. Sawdust”.

Depending on model, it may have been built by DeWalt. The Early (pre 1962) DeWalt Radial arm saws are the best out there, and usually can be had for next to nothing on CL.

http://joneakes.com/products/
http://www.mrsawdust.com/

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