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Forum topic by JAY Made posted 02-07-2017 08:37 PM 635 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JAY Made

201 posts in 1883 days


02-07-2017 08:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource question

Hey Guys,

In the next year or so I’m going to be remodeling my kitchen is there a free cabinet design software? I know I could sketchup (I’m not very strong) but I was wondering if there specific to cabinet building that people use?

Thanks

-- We all should push ourselves to learn new skills.


12 replies so far

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#1 posted 02-07-2017 09:27 PM

Not everything in SketchUp has to be done from scratch. Their 3D Warehouse has lots of cabinets that you can drop into your drawing. It may or may not suit your needs, but it’s one place to look.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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JAY Made

201 posts in 1883 days


#2 posted 02-08-2017 01:39 PM



Not everything in SketchUp has to be done from scratch. Their 3D Warehouse has lots of cabinets that you can drop into your drawing. It may or may not suit your needs, but it s one place to look.

- RichTaylor

That sounds good, but does Sketchup generate a cut list and cutting diagram?

-- We all should push ourselves to learn new skills.

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

989 posts in 2814 days


#3 posted 02-08-2017 01:46 PM

There is an add-on called Cut List 4.1 that will do this. It works great for sheet goods. For dimensional lumber, the cutting diagram is good if you have all standard sized boards. It can also “parts” such as hinges, knobs, etc. Of course, all is dependent on you drawing design using components it can recognize, i.e. component names, material names, etc.

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rwe2156

2716 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 02-08-2017 02:23 PM

Unless you’re a lot quicker than me, by the time you learn to use the program, couldn’t you draw it by hand?

I also highly recommend Cutlist for cabinetry.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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JAY Made

201 posts in 1883 days


#5 posted 02-08-2017 08:36 PM

Ok Sketchup might be an option, but are there any other program options?

-- We all should push ourselves to learn new skills.

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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 02-08-2017 08:45 PM

Here is some homework for you.
http://thetechhacker.com/2014/03/29/top-10-free-cabinet-design-software/

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3116 posts in 3070 days


#7 posted 02-09-2017 04:27 PM

Designing a cabinet in Sketchup can be very beneficial to you. You can get accurate dimensions. Design one cabinet and duplicate it for other cabinets just like it.

Draw in the drawers and you have instant dimensions for a cutlist.

Designing cabinets doesn’t take a lot of Sketchup experience.

Besides drawing the solid pieces (and making components for each one), the push/pull tool, Orbit/Pan tool, and the Move/Copy tool are the ones I use most.

Rob Cameron’s “Sketchup For Woodworkers” is an excellent way to start.

Good luck.
Mike

Here is an example of a cabinet I am working on for a dressing table.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#8 posted 02-09-2017 04:54 PM

To expand on what Mike just said, I use a tip from Bob Lang and do a copy/move of my entire completed piece to an open space in the drawing, explode it, and drag the pieces out so that they are visible, and I can dimension each one. Cut lists are valuable, but so is seeing each piece as an entity and where it fits in. You can also get information that might not be in a basic cut list, such as tenon dimensions, etc.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#9 posted 02-12-2017 01:48 AM

JAY Made,

Since you asked whether anyone uses something other than SketchUp, I thought I would chime in.

I use TurboCad Professional Platinum Version 21 (about $400). I learned TurboCad a few years before SketchUp was introduced, and since it meets my needs, I have stayed with TurboCad.

Since I am only familiar with SketchUp from their tutorial demo videos, I cannot compare the TurboCad to SkecthUp. I can say that TurboCad Pro has yet to fail to draw whatever I wanted to draw, no matter the complexity. It includes an integrate database feature which I have never used. But if setup properly perhaps it could be coaxed into generating a cut list and maybe even calculate board foot quantities. It does have a plywood cut diagram feature which I do not use. My approach is to create an Excel spread sheet for my cut list and place sheets of plywood and arrange plywood parts on a separate TurboCad layer. These methods ensure that I double check my drawings and dimensions and get a good last look at the design.

TurboCad Pro Platinum is expensive to purchase but buying the prior version from CadandGraphics (http://www.cadandgraphics.com/?gclid=CLGezse2idICFY-1wAodvvwHPw) saves some money. IMIS Design also offers TurboCad Deluxe, which offers fewer features for a lot less money. But the database feature may not be available in this $100 version. There is a steep learning curve with either TurboCad version. I am not sure how the TurboCad learning curve compares to that of SketchUp.

Since there seems to be a lot of SketchUp users on LJ and it is free or inexpensive, SketchUp might be the better choice for you. TurboCad does offer trial versions for a limited number of days for free if you want to check it out (https://www.turbocad.com/content/free-trials). TurboCad comes with a 1000+ page manual and on-line help when the purchased from CadandGraphics.

View Madland's profile

Madland

7 posts in 2089 days


#10 posted 02-23-2017 04:35 AM

I have used eCabinets System 3D Design software. It’s specific to cabinet design, includes a library of cabinets that can be modified to fit your need and it’s free. It will automatically create a cut list and a sheet layout! It is not super intuitive, but it is very powerful.

View BobLang's profile

BobLang

148 posts in 3239 days


#11 posted 02-23-2017 04:08 PM

There are cabinet design programs, but they tend to be pricey and use “parametric modeling”. That means you spend a lot of time entering data about how you intend to build cabinets, then the software applies that to an overall size. These systems are good if you’re a large production shop that builds lots of boxes exactly the same way. They come off the rails if you want to design something new or make one oddball cabinet.

The beauty of using SketchUp is that you can model your “typical” cabinet, save it and modify copies of it quickly and easily. You can build a library of component parts as you go and reuse them over and over. There are also a lot of cabinet models available in the 3D warehouse that you can download and plug into a room model. It the end SketchUp can generate an accurate and detailed list of every part in the model. With SketchUp you can have your cake and eat it too, plugging in pre-built models and designing custom and one-off cabinets.

Here is a blog post about using SketchUp for cabinet design that compares different types of software.

-- Bob Lang, https://readwatchdo.com

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2906 days


#12 posted 02-23-2017 07:31 PM

I’ve been looking on this topic for a while now as well. I’ve started design with a builder on my next house and will be doing my cabinets. I’m well versed in sketchup , but will be going another route.

If you are just looking at a way to design and layout basics or just add a basic cut list then skethup will work but you have a learning curve.

I want more. I’m going to cut mine with cnc so needed more.

What I found is cabinet design software is nice and a niche. It’s nice to have capabilities to layout the cabinets design in your slides (don’t underestimate that), and toe kick types and other things.

I found quickly its expensive, to buy. However there are onlline versions that you can rent by the month that would do what you want. So say you need 2 or 3 months to plan and finalize thats still much better than buying.

It will give you cutlists parts lists and pricing capabilities. Something to consider. There is a free one that you have to request and fill out a form and they mail it to you that has some of those features. I was using that before sketchup came a long. I think its cabinets plus, but not sure.

Later and good luck. IM if you have any other questions on the rentals. I’ve been loolking for about a year now.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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