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End grain cutting board Warpage?

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Forum topic by H Dorrego posted 01-25-2008 05:28 PM 1687 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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H Dorrego

11 posts in 3798 days


01-25-2008 05:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question walnut maple

Made a cutting board ala TWW’s. It warped on me the day after the second glue up. I clamped it with cawls for a few days and that seemed to work but the next day it started to warp on me again . Has anyone had that happen to them? and is there a remedy or is it now scrap? I’d appreciate any input. I used maple and walnut.

-- H Dorrego


14 replies so far

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 3884 days


#1 posted 01-25-2008 05:37 PM

Explain warped. Are the joints separating? Or is the whole cutting board surface twisting?

Dalec

View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3976 days


#2 posted 01-25-2008 06:30 PM

We made 5 of those boards for Christmas, the same exact thing happened to ours, I just flipped them concave side down and waited for them to straighten.
I only had to slightly plane one of them, they seemed alive!!!
After we finished with Salad Bowl they sat for about a week and didn’t rewarp, haven’t heard from the recipients but I guess there alright.
hope it works the same for you.

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

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dalec

612 posts in 3884 days


#3 posted 01-25-2008 07:02 PM

It is an issue of the different types of wood expanding at different rates due to moisture difference in the those woods?

Dalec

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H Dorrego

11 posts in 3798 days


#4 posted 01-26-2008 05:36 PM

Dalec, the joints weren’t separating, the whole board started to curl up. Thanks Mark, It was a mystery to me why this was happening. the wood was well acclimated, I thought that maybe I had’nt left it in the clamps long enough. I did the same thing as you and decided to proceed with finishing the board. Glad to know I was’nt the only one that this had happened to. Thanks for the imput.

-- H Dorrego

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dalec

612 posts in 3884 days


#5 posted 01-26-2008 08:20 PM

Stevie,

How thick is your cutting board? I am thinking maybe if it is on the thinner side that it may not be as stable??

Dalec

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

14172 posts in 3979 days


#6 posted 01-26-2008 08:25 PM

run it thru your drum sander … a little bit on each side until both sides clean up

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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dalec

612 posts in 3884 days


#7 posted 01-26-2008 08:35 PM

Dan,

Got stuck looking at why the board warped and not at a solutions. Thanks for bringing it back to focus.

Dalec

View H Dorrego's profile

H Dorrego

11 posts in 3798 days


#8 posted 01-27-2008 07:40 PM

Dalec the board was 1”+1/4. Clamped it again with cawls and it flattened out . Just hoping it stays that way. I went on TWW’s forum and aparrantly this has happened to quite a few people.

-- H Dorrego

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dalec

612 posts in 3884 days


#9 posted 01-28-2008 05:15 PM

Stevierae,

Sure would be nice to understand what caused all those cutting boards to warp.

Hope you were able to fix the warpage problem.

Dalec

View che's profile

che

123 posts in 4022 days


#10 posted 01-28-2008 05:39 PM

Were the boards glued up (placed) with one side flat on a bench top? Wood glue has a lot of water in it which needs to escape through the wood. If the board was flat on a table or bench the water would leave the exposed side a LOT faster than the side down against the bench / table top. The same end grain that makes the board easy on knives allows water to evaporate very very quickly. If I remember correctly Matt recommended storing the boards on edge which would prevent uneven drying and the resulting warping. The board should go flat, or nearly so, after the moisture content has gone back to equilibrium.

-- Che.

View schwingding's profile

schwingding

133 posts in 3821 days


#11 posted 01-28-2008 07:08 PM

Che has what is probably the correct answer. He has explained it perfectly well.

-- Just another woodworker

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 3884 days


#12 posted 01-28-2008 07:46 PM

Che’s explanation makes a lot of sense. Thanks!

Dalec

View Brad_Nailor's profile

Brad_Nailor

2539 posts in 3953 days


#13 posted 01-28-2008 08:22 PM

I have had this problem with a few of the cutting boards I have made, none of them endgrain. If the board is layed flat on a counter it will warp no matter what glue, finish, wood type you use. Wood will always continue to absorb moisture and expand and contract. The side laying flat on the counter will not have the same exposure to the atmosphere and will casue the board to cup or rack. I tried to combat this by installing wood bungs as feet but the boards just slid on the counter, and then I couldnt run it through the sander without chiseling off the feet. I just tell people I give them to to try and store the board on its side when not in use.

-- http://www.facebook.com/pages/DSO-Designs/297237806954248

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H Dorrego

11 posts in 3798 days


#14 posted 01-29-2008 03:21 PM

Thank you guys. Alot of good info.

-- H Dorrego

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