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If you haven't set up your bandsaw the Alex Snodgrass way

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 02-05-2017 12:15 AM 3227 views 1 time favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1637 days


02-05-2017 12:15 AM

You should really do it. I have watched the video a couple of times, but always did the setup at another time. I thought I had everything down, but when I listened to him on the 360 Woodworking podcast this week, I realized I had not followed every step. I went to the Indy Woodworking Show today and went to his workshop, and I think I finally got the whole down.

I did it one more time on my Craftsman (Rikon) 12” bandsaw. This is not greatest bandsaw out there, but adequate. Here’s a piece of walnut I re-sawed with just an ordinary 3/8” Olson blade.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


30 replies so far

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rhett

742 posts in 3506 days


#1 posted 02-05-2017 12:29 AM

Agreed. I heard about him/his video on WoodTalk. I too got amazing results from a machine I once hated.

-- Doubt kills more dreams than failure.

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jimintx

513 posts in 1424 days


#2 posted 02-05-2017 12:44 AM

I need to find those videos.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1637 days


#3 posted 02-05-2017 12:47 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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rwe2156

2716 posts in 1320 days


#4 posted 02-05-2017 12:56 AM

Would some explain to me why drift is such a big deal?

Isn’t drift determined by the relation of the wheel axis to the table? Plus if its a flat wheel, what difference would it make where the gullets lie?

Personally, I’ve tried his technique on both my saws and it did not eliminate drift.

I’ve researched this and found that the PM machines have parallel wheels. Other machines do not as a result drift is built in and there is nothing you can do to eliminate it. I’ve owned probably 5 different bandsaws and every single one of the manual has instructions on adjusting fence for drift.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1834 days


#5 posted 02-05-2017 12:57 AM

I was there today too! I bought that small blade tensioner to try out too. Can’t wait.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1637 days


#6 posted 02-05-2017 01:02 AM



Plus if its a flat wheel, what difference would it make where the gullets lie? for drift.

- rwe2156

because most bandsaw tires aren’t flat, they’re crowned, as I understand it. Mine are.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1637 days


#7 posted 02-05-2017 01:11 AM

I ve researched this and found that the PM machines have parallel wheels. Other machines do not as a result drift is built in and there is nothing you can do to eliminate it. I ve owned probably 5 different bandsaws and every single one of the manual has instructions on adjusting fence for drift.

- rwe2156

I’m not so sure about that. I’m pretty sure the mechanism to adjust the position of the blade on the wheel on bandsaws tilts the upper wheel.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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cracknpop

259 posts in 2188 days


#8 posted 02-05-2017 01:25 AM

Great respect for Alex Snodgrass. I had bought his guides and followed his video but was still having an alignment issue with my band saw. Talked with him at the Indy wood show the next year. A couple days later, I received a call from an engineer at the manufacturer who told me, “Alex Snodgrass asked me to call you”

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

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NormG

5878 posts in 2843 days


#9 posted 02-05-2017 02:09 AM

Alex did us all a great favor when he did that video. Very impressive and helpful

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

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Matt

159 posts in 790 days


#10 posted 02-05-2017 06:23 AM

I’ve got the carter guides on my Jet 16”. World of difference when added with set up per his instructions. (show demonstration) The mag fence and “FAST” set up bars are worth the price of admission. I butterflied a 8”x8”x4” block of 20 Wenge and Mahogany glueups with a 1/4” 3tpi blade. The cut was basically perfect with zero drift.

-- My "projects" always look better with beer goggles.

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coxhaus

64 posts in 734 days


#11 posted 02-05-2017 06:38 AM

I like the Alex Snodgrass bandsaw way. It works well for me on several different bandsaws with smaller blades. The only problem I see is when you use large blades, the wheels are too small. I have to position the large blades across the whole wheel.

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#12 posted 02-06-2017 04:03 AM


Plus if its a flat wheel, what difference would it make where the gullets lie? for drift.

- rwe2156

because most bandsaw tires aren t flat, they re crowned, as I understand it. Mine are.

- CharlesA

The vast majority of European saws have flat tires (Minimax, Felder, Hammer, Laguna and Agazzani for example). His methods are aimed mainly toward small lightweight saws.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1053 days


#13 posted 02-06-2017 01:43 PM



I like the Alex Snodgrass bandsaw way. It works well for me on several different bandsaws with smaller blades. The only problem I see is when you use large blades, the wheels are too small. I have to position the large blades across the whole wheel.

- coxhaus


I have the same situation with my PM14? If I use and do the Snodgrass method- I am limited to a 5/8” blade.

-- Desert_Woodworker

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1637 days


#14 posted 02-06-2017 01:45 PM

Isn’t that because Snodgrass (and a lot of other folks) say that you shouldn’t use larger than a 1/2” blade on a 14’ bandsaw?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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jmartel

7531 posts in 1989 days


#15 posted 02-06-2017 03:11 PM



Isn t that because Snodgrass (and a lot of other folks) say that you shouldn t use larger than a 1/2” blade on a 14 bandsaw?

- CharlesA

Correct. A 14” saw cannot tension a 3/4” blade enough, despite the manufacturer’s claims that the saw can handle it. A 1/2” is fine for resawing anyway. I’ve gotten the same results with the snodgrass setup and a 1/2” Olson blade (and a Woodslicer worked even better) on my Grizzly 14”er.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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