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small t slots

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Forum topic by droppedtuning posted 02-02-2017 10:21 PM 811 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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droppedtuning

31 posts in 1634 days


02-02-2017 10:21 PM

any suggestions on how to make t slots this small? maybe 1/16 or 3/32 high and 5/16 or 3/8 wide ?


22 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1497 posts in 1221 days


#1 posted 02-02-2017 10:30 PM

Fret saw?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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droppedtuning

31 posts in 1634 days


#2 posted 02-02-2017 10:31 PM


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Kazooman

867 posts in 1786 days


#3 posted 02-02-2017 11:03 PM

I do not have the answer, but let me jump in to clarify (I hope) what the OP is asking.

He is not asking about the grooves that the strings are riding in (hence a fret saw will not work).

He wants to make very small “tee slots” for the individual white pieces of the bridge to slide in. This will allow for adjustment to achieve proper intonation of the instrument.

I will have to think about it, but for now I have no good idea about how to achieve this, short of some custom made bits or much more time with some very small files than anyone would choose to endure. What I would be concerned about is that this looks incredibly fragile to me. The tops of the “tees” are anchored by very narrow sections of wood and the direction of the grain suggests to me that they are just crying to pop off. Making the machined block that the individual bridges ride in out of something other than wood seems like a good idea. Not as great a look, but better in the long run. The individual bridge pieces are not wood, so why shouldn’t the piece they rest in be something else too?

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Ripper70

605 posts in 742 days


#4 posted 02-02-2017 11:58 PM

Maybe a Dremel tool? Perhaps you could cut the vertical slot by hand that’s wide enough for the neck of the slot cutter and then finish with the Dremel.

In the pics above, it looks to me like they might have been precision cut by hand. Extra fine chisels and a diamond wire saw blade? I dunno. Looks like some fine work there.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Lee

95 posts in 711 days


#5 posted 02-03-2017 12:23 AM

The Dremel is the way to go, they have a 1/4” dovetail bit that looks like it would be about the right size, just have to build a jig to hold the dremel and index the fret piece through it. http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/dremel14dovetailhighspeedsteelcutter.aspx

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1605 posts in 2698 days


#6 posted 02-03-2017 12:47 AM

Grove out a piece with a straight router bit, then take the grooved piece to a scroll saw to cut the T out or use a hand coping saw.

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Ripper70

605 posts in 742 days


#7 posted 02-03-2017 12:52 AM

Do you have a drill press? If so, maybe if you chuck the Dremel bit and move the piece under the bit you could get a more stable set up and therefore more accuracy. Just thinkin’ out loud here.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Grandpa

3258 posts in 2509 days


#8 posted 02-03-2017 01:20 AM

I was thinking exactly like patcollins. use a coping saw or a scroll saw after cutting the big slot.

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devann

2246 posts in 2526 days


#9 posted 02-03-2017 01:50 AM

Get youself a keyhole router bit. They’re typically used to make that hole in the back of a piece of wood that fits over a nail to hang on the wall.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#10 posted 02-03-2017 02:05 AM

Cut the slots with whatever then use a ground down Dremel router bit.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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devann

2246 posts in 2526 days


#11 posted 02-03-2017 03:13 AM

Here is Rockler’s version of a keyhole router bit. Different makers will have slightly different dimensions.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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patcollins

1605 posts in 2698 days


#12 posted 02-03-2017 03:24 AM

What the heck…

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patcollins

1605 posts in 2698 days


#13 posted 02-03-2017 03:25 AM

A keyhole bit was my first thought too, but the T portion of the slot looks to only be about 1/4th as large as the keyhole bit would produce. It looks to me like he needs something smaller than the thickness of a dime.


Here is Rockler s version of a keyhole router bit. Different makers will have slightly different dimensions.

- devann


View Gripbd's profile

Gripbd

16 posts in 626 days


#14 posted 02-03-2017 03:56 AM

I’ve never tried this, but what if you cut vertical slot with a router and then cut the “T” with a coping saw.

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devann

2246 posts in 2526 days


#15 posted 02-03-2017 04:47 AM

Whiteside will make about any profile you want. I would think they can modify their keyhole bit to the desired dimensions. Somebody made a tool to cut the profiles pictured in OP post. Are the pictures shown, examples of pieces of wood that were mass produced?

A fret saw would probably be a cheaper alternative.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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