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Need to sound proof garage. Help!

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Forum topic by Oldhomestead posted 02-01-2017 03:31 AM 947 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oldhomestead

6 posts in 523 days


02-01-2017 03:31 AM

So we have a baby on the way and my shop is in a 2 car garage under the top floor. The master bedroom and nursery is pretty much right above the shop. I normally work at night after my full time job so HAVE to find a way to soundproof the garage or the nursery. Not working in the stop is not an option at all. Any ideas?

-- Fb - old homestead working


24 replies so far

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2784 days


#1 posted 02-01-2017 04:06 AM

First of all, seal ALL air leaks. You can start by picking up a case of latex caulk and sealing 2xs to floors and so on. Spray foam big holes.

When you’re happy with your air leak thing, layer in some rock against the bottom of the floor. The more layers the merrier. It absorbs vibration, which kills sound.

Sound is just refractions and compressions of air waves. Stop those and you stop sound.

I did these things to a kitchen and, even before the insulation was in or the rock was on, I couldn’t hear a significant storm taking place outside.

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

150 posts in 2084 days


#2 posted 02-01-2017 04:52 AM

icynene spray foam!

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#3 posted 02-01-2017 04:57 AM

Spend some time on Home Theater forums there is more DIY sound proofing info on those forums than you will ever care to read.

View crank49's profile

crank49

4026 posts in 2811 days


#4 posted 02-01-2017 05:12 AM

Hand tools?

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

619 posts in 748 days


#5 posted 02-01-2017 05:26 AM

+1 for Kelly’s rock wool suggestion. You’re gonna need allot of it.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

408 posts in 580 days


#6 posted 02-01-2017 12:19 PM

Is the ceiling currently drywalled? If not, what Ripper mentioned, the rock wool sound insulation, works great (though not perfect). Keep in mind that sound will get through, no matter what, but there are a few things (like the aforementioned insulation) that you can do to significantly reduce it. Another option is to add a second layer of drywall to the ceiling/walls, with an adhesive designed for sound reduction in between.

And Huxley is right, theater forums (and home studio forums) have tons of great advice on the topic. Used to study music tech and geeked out for hours reading this stuff when I was still recording.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View clin's profile

clin

754 posts in 836 days


#7 posted 02-01-2017 11:04 PM

While sealing air leaks is a big part of sound proofing, it’s just a part of it. The sound will vibrate the garage walls and ceiling. Since these are attached to the rest of your house, the noise will be carried to other parts of your house.

For true sound proofing, you need to physically isolate the ceiling and walls. This is the room within a room concept. This I suspect is more than you want to do.

How much the sound can vibrate the walls and ceiling is a function of how massive these walls and ceiling are. So increasing the mass can be helpful. For example, a double layer of sheet rock.

In any case, lots’ of DIY info on soundproofing on the web. I’d study this and see if there is a tiered approach you can take. One where you can do something, and if that’s good enough your done. If not, you do the next things. This might allow you to solve the problem with minimal investment.

However, you are not going to make major differences with just a few hundred $$$. Effective sound proofing is not cheap.

By the way, once your baby comes, you’re not going to have nearly as much time as you think to work in the shop. If this is your first, if you’re like most, you have no idea how much your life is about to change. Hopefully you’ll find it a good kind of change, but change it will be. And hobbies tend to go to the bottom of the pile.

Congratulations on coming event!!!

-- Clin

View Iamjacob's profile

Iamjacob

48 posts in 2466 days


#8 posted 02-01-2017 11:35 PM

My local HD sells (or at least used to sell) a product called quietrock (https://www.quietrock.com/) that is 2 layers of thin sheetrock with a sound isolating material sandwiched in between that is supposedly pretty good for sound proofing.

The other way to go is to let the baby get used to loud sounds. When my wife and I had our first child we tried to make as much noise as possible around her. Run the vacuum, turn the tv up, run the dishwasher and disposal, anything you would normally hear during the day or night. Your baby will learn to sleep through it.

Both of my kids sleep directly over my shop and sleep just fine.

YMMV

Congrats on new baby!

View BobBlarney's profile

BobBlarney

46 posts in 975 days


#9 posted 02-01-2017 11:37 PM


While sealing air leaks is a big part of sound proofing, it s just a part of it. The sound will vibrate the garage walls and ceiling. Since these are attached to the rest of your house, the noise will be carried to other parts of your house.

For true sound proofing, you need to physically isolate the ceiling and walls. This is the room within a room concept. This I suspect is more than you want to do.

- clin

This is the best solution – the room within a room concept. I actually did this in my basement, when I needed a study room for graduate school.

It is doable and reasonable because it won’t be structural. Build a completely freestanding room with 2×4 stud walls & joists, install unfaced fiberglass sound insulation, and add wall covering. For more sound control and real comfort, I’d install interlocking 1/2” polyurethane mats on the floor

-- Curator, Museum of Unfinished Projects

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1704 days


#10 posted 02-01-2017 11:38 PM



So we have a baby on the way

- Oldhomestead

Just oil everything really good and check back on it all in two years.

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

View John's profile

John

224 posts in 1421 days


#11 posted 02-02-2017 12:39 AM

This is an isolation clip used for metal studs. They can be used on wood framing as well. Installing these along with the DWC over exisiting drywall (or directly to to the framing), then hanging two layers of 5/8 drywall,will dramatically reduce noise transfer. Sound insulation is a must if the framing is exposed. This may be a more expensive option, but it is an option.
Also, if you have tall enough ceilings, an acoustical ceiling grid system hung from a similar sound isolation clip product would make a big difference.
There is alot of methods to isolate the sound to the garage. Pick one and run with it. Good luck.
Congrats by the way.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

View BenjaminNY's profile

BenjaminNY

122 posts in 1242 days


#12 posted 02-02-2017 01:32 AM

Kids get used to stuff. Don’t worry too much.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2612 posts in 2136 days


#13 posted 02-02-2017 01:35 AM

You’re making the mistake of thinking he’s gonna sleep when you tell him to. I agree with don’t worry about it.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1322 posts in 1788 days


#14 posted 02-02-2017 01:49 AM

I’m not sure of the age of the house, but if it is under 30 years old I can only assume it’s double layer 5/8 drywall (fire code), and batt insulation (for warmth). I would start with a layer of Fiberboard Sheathing followed by The DWC Isolaters, then another layer of 5/8” drywall. The fiber board will dampen the sound and the air gap made by the DWC is going help the most. That being said you don’t have to be silent for your kid to sleep. when a newborn reaches like 3 weeks its time to start sleep training them. My kids won’t sleep if the house is quiet. I still remember my oldest sleeping in her high chair at the table 8’ away from me while I was banging out the windows in the dinning room. she slept through the entire thing sawzall, compressor and all.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1823 days


#15 posted 02-02-2017 02:24 AM

So we have a baby on the way

- Oldhomestead

Just oil everything really good and check back on it all in two years.

- UncannyValleyWoods

Speaking as a dad whose son is 4 1/2 and has a daughter who just turned 1, I laughed so f*ing hard when I read this. You must also be or have been a dad, because truer words could not have been said.

Good luck OP with getting your shop time nightly, but you’ll be busy trying to grab as much sleep as you can for the first 6 months of your tiny humans existence.

Congrats on the little person! They are amazing to behold and grow up super quick, seems like only the other day my son was a little blob drooling all over the place, now he’s running everywhere and farting every 10 seconds because he finds it hilarious to gross out his mom.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

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