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Door threshold glue-up -- Am I making a big mistake?

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Forum topic by William Shelley posted 01-31-2017 05:06 PM 1013 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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William Shelley

477 posts in 1302 days


01-31-2017 05:06 PM

I am doing some remodeling work on my house and I’ve changed a bathroom into an “open” design. It’s a little unconventional. The position of the door allows for the possibility of water to splash on the door threshold a bit. I decided to make the threshold from something incredibly rot resistant, so Ipe was a natural choice. However my local lumberyard didn’t have any ipe boards wide enough for what I needed so I did a glue-up of four strips (alternating the growth rings as best I could).

I decided to use large countersunk stainless steel screws to fasten the threshold. Now I’m worried that since I’m screwing down a glue-up piece, if the wood tries to shift and the screws won’t let it then I could end up with busted glue lines, especially considering how difficult Ipe is to glue.

For what it’s worth, I did wipe down all the glued surfaces with acetone prior to applying the glue. I used Titebond II.

Here’s a picture of the threshold:

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective


6 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

370 posts in 421 days


#1 posted 01-31-2017 05:11 PM

Use a marble threshold . . .

M

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

317 posts in 1832 days


#2 posted 01-31-2017 05:28 PM

I have no real experience here so take this with a grain of salt, but my instinct is that is will be fine. Wood moves but I don’t think ipe over the width of a threshold is going to move enough to cause problems even in that environment. I suspect there is enough give in the floor the threshold is screwed down to alleviate any problems. If your worried about it you could drill the holes in the ipe just a bit oversized.

-- Ted

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

198 posts in 452 days


#3 posted 01-31-2017 06:42 PM

Should be fine. Wood expands and contracts across the width. You’ve pinned it down the center so is has room to push towards the sides. And while it haven’t looked it up, something that narrow is not going to change much.

-- Sawdust Maker

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TungOil

740 posts in 328 days


#4 posted 01-31-2017 07:00 PM

are you tiling up against one side? If so you might have trouble with the grout lines, they are unforgiving to any wood movement

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1302 days


#5 posted 01-31-2017 07:46 PM

Thanks everyone.


are you tiling up against one side? If so you might have trouble with the grout lines, they are unforgiving to any wood movement

- TungOil

It’s almost touching existing tile in a couple places but there’s about 1/8-3/16” gap that will be filled with high performance silicone caulking which should absorb any movement.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

310 posts in 2047 days


#6 posted 02-05-2017 04:21 PM

Generally,I agree that the little bit of movement you may get is probably not going to be an issue.

But I’ll take a very practical approach, you’ve already drilled and countersunk the screws, so basically you’re already locked in on the mounting method. If it cracks or warps, so be it. Either the movement will be so small you won’t care or you’ll have to basically remake the threshold. So just go with it and see what happens.

But if you were going to remake it and assuming that it doesn’t stick up too much so that people are constantly kicking it with a lot of force, then I would recommend using something like liquid nails construction adhesive to mount it next time instead of screws. A generous bead down the middle and then silicone calk in the gaps on the side. Since it’s essentially only fixed in the middle, expansion will not be an issue as the caulk will absorb whatever movement you have. Also gives a clean solid wood look from the top.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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