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New to woodworking ... part 2

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Forum topic by WoodsmanWoodworker posted 09-11-2010 10:55 PM 1306 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2285 days


09-11-2010 10:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question wood woodworking woodsman help advice tools making hand idea ideas

This is just going to be the almost same question as before but more in depth to help me out just a bit more. To give a quick overview…i’m starting to gather hand tools ( no power tools ) to start doing projects such as dovetail boxes and chests, turkey box calls,cutting board, flutes, walking sticks / canes,chess board, bowls, knife handles, chairs and maybe a few i left out. So basicly i’m looking for hand tools to make just about anything i may come up with. I have here a list, i have compiled from my own research as well as from peolple here on lumberjocks, of hand tools i have or am planning to have. Please feel free to adjust my list and take off anything you feel might be un-needed or something that i have missed. Thanks in advance for your help.

Bit and brace
Hand crank drill
Hand crank drill press
Rasps
Files
Mallet
Coping Saw
Miter hand saw
Miter box
Crosscut saw
Rip saw
Gents saw
Bench chisels
Mortise chisels
Gouge chisels
Paring chisels
Corner chisels
Tri-square
Gauges
Spokeshave
Bevel
Drawknife
Cabinet scrapper
Hand planes ( need advice especially on this one )

RECENTLY ADDED
Sharpening stone

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~


13 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2434 days


#1 posted 09-11-2010 11:50 PM

Popular Woodworking has a book out called “Handtool Essentials”. I wish I had read it before I started buying any tools. It’s got great advice on tools, how to use them, which tools do what, which tools are best to start out with, etc. It has very good explaination of planes and how to use them. I bought a couple I found out I don’t need and got a cheap plane that should have been my highest quality one. If I had read the book first I would have saved way more $ than the book cost.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View JuniorJoiner's profile

JuniorJoiner

463 posts in 2903 days


#2 posted 09-12-2010 12:13 AM

your first purchases should be sharpening stones if you plan on going the hand tool route. dull hand tools just don’t cut it. I suggest nortons or shaptons.
then I would buy LN block plane, Small square, and a spokeshave, and a small chisel.
don’t fall into the trapp of buying cheaper or discount tools just to have them, buy good quality. that way you only buy them once.

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

View WoodsmanWoodworker's profile

WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2285 days


#3 posted 09-12-2010 12:33 AM

Thank you both so far, i really appreciate the help.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2537 days


#4 posted 09-12-2010 04:09 AM

I am not a hand tool expert. In fact, I am not even close. Despite that, I have some advise. Don’t waste your time or money on cheap tools. Also, especially with hand tools, don’t shy away from used tools. A 100 year old plane can be (and probably is) as good or better than a new plane you can buy today. The same holds true for chisels, saws and other hand tools.

Here is the problem – - When you enter the world of used hand tools you really need to know what you are doing. You need to be able to distinguish between the good stuff and the crap. There are some pretty good books available and I suggest you learn a little before you spend a lot.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View JuniorJoiner's profile

JuniorJoiner

463 posts in 2903 days


#5 posted 09-12-2010 06:42 AM


these are the tools usually on my bench, besides the shoulder plane, I think these would be a great start.

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

View souichiro's profile

souichiro

369 posts in 2808 days


#6 posted 09-12-2010 07:01 AM

I’d almost say start the project you are the most excited about. And get the tools as you need them. Only the tools you need. This way you can get a really good feel for what you are using them for. Research each tool as it comes to be needed, and buy used if possible. The projects may go slow at first, but it’s a learning curve anyway. And it should be a fun experience to learn. I think that you’d save much more money in the long run, and more than likely end up with tools that you know, and use.

-- Dale, Oregon

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2285 days


#7 posted 09-12-2010 12:49 PM

Thanks… i am going to check out two books about hand tools soon, and look around for used ones. Hopefully the book helps me understand whats good and whats crap as mentioned above. Again, this means a lot to me thanks guys.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2349 posts in 2460 days


#8 posted 09-12-2010 01:31 PM

You might want a “favorite hammer” and a nail set.
Mine hammer is a 12oz. Estwing.
Used only for tiny finishing nails.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23157 posts in 2329 days


#9 posted 09-12-2010 03:01 PM

There is a book that I got many years ago called How to Work With Tools and Wood . This book is not going to teach you a whole lot about working with wood. It does have a few first projects that are useful in the shop and good to get started with.

However, what I liked about the book is that it had a long list of hand tools that anyone should strive to own if he is going to be a good woodworker. They had 3 lists, those you should get just to get started, those you should get at the next level, and those you should get at the advanced level.

As I have added to my collection I have always made many list with pencil and paper; it’s just sort of a habit that I go through as I think about the tools that I have and those that I don’t have. I’ve referred to that book so many times over the years that the section with the lists is just about to fall apart.

I believe the book may have been published by Stanley but I am not sure about that. It’s sort of like that chapter with the comprehensive list of hand tools was written to answer your question. Maybe they knew that you were going to be a Lumberjock one day. :)

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2285 days


#10 posted 09-12-2010 11:31 PM

Thanks, i’ll take a look at all the suggested books.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1546 posts in 3224 days


#11 posted 09-12-2010 11:47 PM

I don’t think anyone has mentioned the workbench yet. A bench with shoulder and tail vices and bench dogs is just about a must for precision hand tool work.

I second the motion for “Handtool Essentials”, and might even be inclined to add “Handplane Essentials”.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

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WoodsmanWoodworker

146 posts in 2285 days


#12 posted 09-15-2010 04:17 AM

Thanks, i look forward to get that book, gather my tools and get some project posts on here.

-- We must protect the forests for those who can't speak, for the trees and animals. ~THE WOODSMAN~

View Ingjr's profile

Ingjr

144 posts in 2479 days


#13 posted 09-16-2010 02:17 AM

Didn’t see dedicated Dovetail saw on your list. Rip saw was mentioned, might want a small one for DT’s. I’m also in the camp of starting a project and buy just what you need for the project. Research and more research. HTH

-- The older I get the faster I was.

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