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Desk Joint Question

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Forum topic by loyalstricklin posted 01-31-2017 02:58 PM 443 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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loyalstricklin

3 posts in 319 days


01-31-2017 02:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood joint joint

I’m making a desk with joints similar to the ones below. I’m currently doing test pieces before cutting them out of walnut.

My question is, what is the best way to make the curves? My current idea is to cut the rough shapes out on the bandsaw, and then use an oscillating edge sander (a rigid) to sand the wood down to my outline.

Any other advise? Also, is there a term for joint like this?

Thanks,
Michael


8 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1636 days


#1 posted 01-31-2017 03:08 PM

My sense would be that with this kind of joint, you get it close with methods you describe before glue up, but you’ll have to do hand work with rasp, sandpaper, etc. for the final look.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7530 posts in 1989 days


#2 posted 01-31-2017 03:13 PM

Oscillating spindle sander or use a router with a template. As far as the joint goes, it’s probably just a normal Mortise & Tenon that’s been shaped.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

870 posts in 1791 days


#3 posted 01-31-2017 03:26 PM

I just noticed that prior to this one I have 666 posts. Must be some kind of omen.

At any rate, I would second the templates and router comment. One for the top curves and one for the bottom. Spend the time to get it as accurate as possible and then all of the curves will be identical.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4414 posts in 3581 days


#4 posted 01-31-2017 03:48 PM

That will work, but I would modify the design a little, such that the legs have some of the curge in them and teh stretchers are straighter – - to have less short grain at the joint, that will want to break off.

So more like this to keep max long grain.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View sras's profile

sras

4666 posts in 2968 days


#5 posted 01-31-2017 03:54 PM

I’d suggest glue up and then shape. That will eliminate the exposed fragile ends of the rails.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View loyalstricklin's profile

loyalstricklin

3 posts in 319 days


#6 posted 01-31-2017 05:34 PM

That’s actually how I’m constructing it…with the little notes that meat the cross members. I bought the rigid oscillating sander this morning and did two legs. I’m pleased with the results. If all goes well, I’ll be making more of these tables and will used a router and template for production work.

Thanks to everyone who answered! I appreciate it.


That will work, but I would modify the design a little, such that the legs have some of the curge in them and teh stretchers are straighter – - to have less short grain at the joint, that will want to break off.

So more like this to keep max long grain.

- DrDirt


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loyalstricklin

3 posts in 319 days


#7 posted 02-18-2017 03:29 AM

I ended up using an oscillating sander. It was a pain. I’d recommend useing a router/table and making a template. I’ll definitely be doing that on all future projects like this. I have a few smaller gaps. probably could have used my shoulder plane a bit more, but I like it well enough.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

328 posts in 2053 days


#8 posted 02-18-2017 04:56 PM

Ah, the dreaded gap that no one else will ever see or notice. I tend to obsess about this stuff, but my neighbor takes a bit more practical approach. He always tells me that anybody in my house looking at the piece close enough to see that gap just needs to go home.

Its looking good to me.

Generally, I use the spindle sander to create the template in 1/4 MDF and then use bandsaw to clear the bulk of the waste and router with the template to clean up.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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