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Working with s2s 4/4 stock

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Forum topic by Joshkrue posted 01-31-2017 02:25 AM 532 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joshkrue

6 posts in 717 days


01-31-2017 02:25 AM

Topic tags/keywords: s2s

I am pretty new to woodworking and bought some 4/4 cherry that is s2s. Some of it as a slight bow or twist to it. I can get it out with my jointer, but I wind up losing a fair amount of thickness to the boards. Are there any tips or secrets to deal with this to save wood thickness?

Thanks in advanced.


11 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1508 posts in 1227 days


#1 posted 01-31-2017 02:40 AM

If the boards are fairly long, sometimes you will lose less thickness if you shorten the board before jointing, especially if the the twist, bow or cup is mostly in one section. Of course if you need the length that doesn’t do you much good.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10642 posts in 2220 days


#2 posted 01-31-2017 02:47 AM

Cut to rough length and width first. And next time spend more time on stock selection, the more the better.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#3 posted 01-31-2017 02:50 AM



Cut to rough length and width first. And next time spend more time on stock selection, the more the better.

- Rick M

Ditto

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

531 posts in 327 days


#4 posted 01-31-2017 03:02 AM

This may seem like a dumb answer but If youre going to mill it yourself get 5/4. Otherwise bee choosy. There is a technique i saw once in a you tube video by one ofthe magazines where you try to split the difference when face jointing. He was able to flatten a fairly twisted board in only a couple passes. The trick is in where you apply pressure. I think he used one pad and pushed from the middle of the board. Sorry i cant find the video.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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Rich

1986 posts in 429 days


#5 posted 01-31-2017 03:11 AM


This may seem like a dumb answer but If youre going to mill it yourself get 5/4. Otherwise bee choosy. There is a technique i saw once in a you tube video by one ofthe magazines where you try to split the difference when face jointing. He was able to flatten a fairly twisted board in only a couple passes. The trick is in where you apply pressure. I think he used one pad and pushed from the middle of the board. Sorry i cant find the video.

- BenDupre

+1 on that. I always give myself some extra room too. Even if it looks perfect at the store, it can move on you when you get it home.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Joshkrue's profile

Joshkrue

6 posts in 717 days


#6 posted 01-31-2017 03:12 AM

Thanks for the tips so far. Unfortunately, there aren’t many lumber options around me or I would go with rough sawn or 5/4. I guess trying to get flatter stock next time is the best option.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#7 posted 01-31-2017 04:59 AM

Where do you buy your S2S wood? If it is a home store like HD or Lowes, I would take it back and get some better pieces. I buy rough lumber but always hand select my boards and never have any warped or twisted wood.

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marshallLaw

10 posts in 639 days


#8 posted 01-31-2017 05:42 AM

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Rich

1986 posts in 429 days


#9 posted 01-31-2017 05:56 AM



here s a link http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/10/flattening-extremely-warped-board-jointer?source=w1722enl&tp=i-H43-BC-z4-4j8BQ-1o-5OXq-1c-4igKL-xT0FH&utm_campaign=fine-woodworking-eletter&utm_source=eletter&utm_medium=eletter&utm_content=fw_eletter&cid=3786&mid=69861564k to a video on flattening boards from Fine Woodworking. It should help you out.

- marshallLaw

That’s a great video I’d seen before. The trick is to have enough extra stock so that the final thickness is sufficient for your needs.

Regardless, you’re going to lose stock thickness according to the amount of twist — or warp, whatever — and you need board thickness to allow for that. Rick M’s comment about working with pieces close to the final dimensions is good too, to minimize the waste.

You do have to be careful trimming boards down though, since those twists, bows and cups can make making the cuts dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1275 posts in 760 days


#10 posted 02-01-2017 02:00 AM

Joshkrue,

I typically use 4/4 lumber and have also used S2S “4/4” lumber. I follow the practice of cutting boards to length but a little oversized and then taking multiple light face passes at the jointer until the board is flat. Somehow I seem to succeed in getting ¾” project material, although there is an occasional board that is just too warped. However, I have rarely landed exactly at a ¾” thickness, usually a little less; within about 1/32” of ¾”. Even if I had a batch of lumber that milled to 11/16” thick, I would probably go ahead and complete the project with it. But that is ok since all the project material is planed to the same thickness.

I have resisted buying 5/4 lumber to get ¾” project parts. The added thickness adds to the lumber costs and I dislike the thought of shaving off and throwing away ½” of material.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1986 posts in 429 days


#11 posted 02-01-2017 02:27 AM



I have resisted buying 5/4 lumber to get ¾” project parts. The added thickness adds to the lumber costs and I dislike the thought of shaving off and throwing away ½” of material.

- JBrow

My horses love the shavings. When I spread them out, the first thing they do is roll in it :)

But you’re right, it is more costly and time consuming. I generally have no problem getting 3/4 stock out of 4/4 s2s. The exception is interior door stiles and rails. I might be able to get away with 6/4 for the 1-3/8 inch rails and stiles, but it’s cutting it close — pun intended. I go ahead and spring for 8/4 to play it safe. One door of material pretty much fills up my 50 gallon chip drum that’s between my planer and my dust collector.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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