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Woodmaster planer giving 'ripply'/'wavy' surface

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Forum topic by ErichK posted 01-30-2017 06:16 PM 1994 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ErichK

79 posts in 503 days


01-30-2017 06:16 PM

Hi all-
I was hoping someone would have a solution to this problem. I’ve got a used Woodmaster 18” planer, before this, I had a PC lunchbox planer that gave a clean glue-ready surface. The woodmaster however is leaving me with a wavy surface, with the bumps perpendicular to the board edge the full width of the board (parallel to the blades).

I inspected the blades and they look sharp! Also, changing the feed speed curiously doesn’t seem to alter these, even when going so slow that all of the blades should be impacting the wood multiple times.

Googling this seems to have no real results! I considered that perhaps the rubber rollers need to be tightened? But I didn’t want to jump to conclusions before asking for advice.

Thanks!


13 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#1 posted 01-30-2017 06:20 PM

Did you make sure your knives are set properly?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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ErichK

79 posts in 503 days


#2 posted 01-30-2017 06:28 PM

The previous owner set the blades, and they SEEM consistent (just measuring with calipers), but I didn’t get the knife setting guage, so I’m looking for a source on them.

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MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#3 posted 01-30-2017 06:42 PM

The previous owner set the blades, and they SEEM consistent (just measuring with calipers), but I didn t get the knife setting guage, so I m looking for a source on them.
- ErichK

First mistake – OWWM Rule #12

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

748 posts in 335 days


#4 posted 01-30-2017 06:44 PM

I used to have a big Bridgewood surface planer that left a pattern similar to what you are describing- it had a solid metal drive roller on the top, almost like a splined shaft. If I took too heavy a cut I could see the ‘tread marks’ left by that feed roller.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

335 posts in 725 days


#5 posted 01-30-2017 07:00 PM

Woodmasters have rubber infeed and outfeed rollers. But Tungoil is right, you can get ridge marks on lumber from the serrated infeed roller found on many planers if your cut is TOO LIGHT. A heavy cut removes the infeed roller marks. I have them on my 20 inch planer.

To the OP, One of your knives is set higher than the others. Slower feed speed would make the “waves” smaller (closer together). If you look close enough, any straight knife planer will leave this ripples, they are usually small enough not to be noticeable. You need to reset your knives (or one of them).

Also, increase down pressure on your feed rollers, that will make sure the single higher knife doesn’t “lift” the board into the planer head, increasing the size of the “waves.”

I have a 12 inch Woodmaster. (from about 1985). Now mostly used as a molder.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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ErichK

79 posts in 503 days


#6 posted 01-30-2017 07:02 PM



One of your knives is set higher than the others. Slower feed speed would make the “waves” smaller (closer together). If you look close enough, any straight knife planer will leave this ripples, they are usually small enough not to be noticeable.

Also, increase down pressure on your feed rollers, that will make sure the single higher knife doesn t “lift” the board into the planer head, increasing the size of the “waves.”

I have a 12 inch Woodmaster. (from about 1985). Now mostly used as a molder.

- sawdustdad

Alright, thanks! I’ve ordered new blades anyway, and a knife set gauge so hopefully I can figure it out easy enough. Perhaps I’ll be more careful with the calipers to see which one is set wrong.

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ErichK

79 posts in 503 days


#7 posted 02-04-2017 02:00 AM

Alright, update! I ordered the knife setting gauge from Woodmaster (kind of a ‘meh’ gauge actually, but not super expensive), and a new set of knives.

I measured all of the blades as they were, and they were all within ~1/32” of eachother. I noticed however that the manual says they should be exposed at max 1/8”. MINE were closer to 3/8” exposed. I set one of the knives all the way down, and I was closer to 3/16” (11/16” knife, 1/2” area). I decided to just set them all the same at that depth (still old knives).

Cutting a piece of Oak at both the fastest and slowest speeds both turned much improved. There is an ever so slight ripple, but it is basically gone.

I have no idea why the instructions from Woodmaster say max 1/8” exposure, but I cannot get that low, my only guess is that either my knives or manual or both are from a newer version of the WM (I have #18 I think!).

Thanks for your help all!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#8 posted 02-04-2017 04:14 AM

I measured all of the blades as they were, and they were all within ~1/32” of eachother.
- ErichK

THAT was your problem, not how proud they sat out from the cutterhead. They should all be set the same height within a few thou. of each other at most, not a few hundred :)

As for how proud they should sit above the cutterhead – that measurement should be from the heel of the knives, not the tips.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View MerylL's profile

MerylL

70 posts in 1211 days


#9 posted 02-04-2017 04:48 AM

I’m no expert, but did just spend a lot of time rebuilding a Jet planer. I agree fully with MrUnix. Not only that, though, I wanted to address the 1/8 vs 3/16. Inside the cutter head, if you take out the blade, you SHOULD find 2 set screws (hex-key/aka Allen wrench) buried deep in a hole, filled with sawdust and gunk. Those will be “set” to touch the back of the blade when it has been set and the gibs tightened. It is the “insurance” that keeps the blade from being pounded back out of “set.” So if those have the blade too deep or too proud, you’ll have an issue. I had to use a very slender pick and air to clean mine so the Allen wrench would engage. But then I set them way in… all the way basically. Then set my blades with the device such as what you bought. I tightened all the gibs enough to secure the blade in place, then backed out the set screws until they touched the bottom of the blade in the slot. Then finish the gibs. I believe that this is 100% a setup issue.

One other thing the manual noted—two, actually—is the height of the table rollers depending on roughness of the wood, and the “proudness” AND tension of the infeed/outfeed rollers, again dependent on wood surface.

Also, DO ALWAYS INVOKE THE OWWM RULE #12!!! The reason I got my stuff so cheap was the original purchaser NEVER ADJUSTED them. They said that they had the seller set them up, and the equipment just never performed. Well, sad to say they messed up some of the stuff within only a few hours (some under 10) of use. But I got it super cheap, and what I had to spend in cash as I fixed them was minimal. I still came up with good tools AND I am no longer afraid of tinkering them into proper adjustment! 2-fer!

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MerylL

70 posts in 1211 days


#10 posted 02-04-2017 04:49 AM

Forgot to click the watchlist.

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ErichK

79 posts in 503 days


#11 posted 02-04-2017 07:03 AM



As for how proud they should sit above the cutterhead – that measurement should be from the heel of the knives, not the tips.

Ah, that explains that, thanks! I thought I was way out of spec.
Inside the cutter head, if you take out the blade, you SHOULD find 2 set screws (hex-key/aka Allen wrench) buried deep in a hole, filled with sawdust and gunk. Those will be “set” to touch the back of the blade when it has been set and the gibs tightened.

Yep, saw those and backed them all the way out. My blades are sitting against the cutterhead.


Also, DO ALWAYS INVOKE THE OWWM RULE #12!!! The reason I got my stuff so cheap was the original purchaser NEVER ADJUSTED them. They said that they had the seller set them up, and the equipment just never performed. Well, sad to say they messed up some of the stuff within only a few hours (some under 10) of use. But I got it super cheap, and what I had to spend in cash as I fixed them was minimal. I still came up with good tools AND I am no longer afraid of tinkering them into proper adjustment! 2-fer!

- MerylL

This came out of a functioning commercial woodshop, so I assumed it was reasonably well setup :/ Annoyingly, the washboard affect didn’t seem to depend on the feed roller speed, so I didn’t suspect it could be blade related.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1275 posts in 760 days


#12 posted 02-04-2017 04:04 PM

ErichK,

I just want to amplify MerylL’s comments, especially his rule #12. It would probably be a good idea to step through all of the procedures set forth in the Woodmaster manual, following them closely. This would include setting the knives and the infeed and outfeed roller tension properly, and applying some grease to the cutter head bearings and some machine oil to the feed roller bushings and cleaning the feed rollers. Once the machine is tuned and serviced and thereafter properly maintained, I am sure it will perform very well for years to come.

I am not an employee or agent of Woodmaster, but I do own two of their products and they continue to perform like new for me. The 12”planer is 20 years old.

View David Freed's profile

David Freed

113 posts in 3507 days


#13 posted 02-05-2017 08:27 PM



Woodmasters have rubber infeed and outfeed rollers.

- sawdustdad


Rubber rollers are standard equipment on Woodmasters but you can get the serrated rollers from Woodmaster. I ordered them when I ordered my 718.

-- David, Southern Indiana

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