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Woodshop Oral Presentation: Surform tool... anyone help?

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Forum topic by newbiewoodworker posted 09-10-2010 10:07 PM 3474 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2288 days


09-10-2010 10:07 PM

For my newly entered shop class(guidance was like pulling teeth to get in..) has my first oral presentation with me jumping both feet first… having missed the first week.

Since all of the common hand tools were already done, he asked me to do a specialized tool; The surform tool…

At first I thought he accidentally grabbed something from culinary arts… having looked like a cheese grater with handles… But wiki informed me of its intent.. but alas it is not the best of sources… so I figured you LJs might be able to give me a hand…

These are the questions I have to answer:
———————————————————————————
1. What is it? a. Does the tool have a nickname?
2. What is the tool used for?
3. Does this tool come in different sizes? a. Made with different materials? b. Is this tool part of a set?
4. How can the tool hurt you?
5. What should you not do with this tool?

———————————————————————————————

Thanks.

He said we aren’t expected to be able to demonstrate it….

Thank you.

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."


30 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#1 posted 09-10-2010 10:18 PM

Cheese grater is a pretty good description. Surform tools have been around on one form or another for many years. I remember my dad having one in our shop in the early 60’s. They come in various shapes and sizes, and they are handy for hogging off large amounts of wood pretty quickly by hand. It’s a roughing tool, meaning it won’t leave a smooth surface.

What should you not do with it? Scratch your butt. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2405 posts in 2387 days


#2 posted 09-10-2010 10:20 PM

So, isn’t this YOUR homework? :)

A lot of drywall installers use one as well. Cleans up edges or helps shape a bevel.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2408 posts in 2383 days


#3 posted 09-11-2010 01:23 AM

We used it to shape poly duct to fit together properly after welding it. You can get it in different sizes and shapes too. Flat or curved for example. This tool wil take the skin off your knuckels easly.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View swirt's profile

swirt

2117 posts in 2433 days


#4 posted 09-11-2010 04:06 AM

1000 little planes on a surface just waiting to see what is under your knuckle. ;)

There are long handled varieties and shorter versions that feel almost like a block plane. They work….errr… less than ok for shaping wood. A rasp does a much better job and is easier to clean out than the surform and will often leave a better looking surface.

I think they are less intimidating than the spiky teeth on a rasp, but I think they are just as hazardous to anyone that uses it with one hand while holding the workpiece with the other (a recipe for an injury)

Never lick a surform! It is just in poor taste ;)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2494 days


#5 posted 09-11-2010 06:18 AM

Swirt: “Never lick a surform! It is just in poor taste ;)”. That cracked me up!!

I’ve owned the 10” one with Handles on both ends, flat replaceable Blade. The round “Tube” one 10” long. A small, 6” Hand Plane type also with a Replaceable Blade.

The 6” “Pocket Plane” is the only one I’ve kept and still use. It works Fast, a little on the Rough Side but good for that type of application. It handles Corners and Edges that a regular Plane would take Chunks out of. Very safe to use and haven’t been bitten by it yet.

Of course I haven’t tried scratching my Butt with it yet Charlie. I’d recommend the 2”x4” Sandvick with a Fine Blade for that. ;-}

Rick

EDIT: Okay. You peaked my Curiosity so I Googled, found them, made by Stanley, into PhotoBucket, as below.
10 inch PlaneSurf 10" 320x240
10 inch RoundSurf 10" 320x240
6 inch Pocket PlaneSurf 6" 320x240
6 inch Fine Pocket Plane BladeSurf Fine 6" 320x240

SO! As Randy said…..Do we get a Passing Grade for doing YOUR Homework For You? ...LOL…

TIP: For your Next Homework Assignment can You Spell G-O-O-G-L-E ?? ;-}

Rick

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2432 days


#6 posted 09-11-2010 11:19 AM

They are the best tool I know of for rough carving “Bondo” when its in that semi cured state; set but not hardened yet. Body shops use them all the time. We use them in the pattern shop at the foundry. They can hog away a lot of material quickly and the teeth don’t clog up like a rasp, it just falls through the holes.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3201 posts in 2299 days


#7 posted 09-11-2010 03:29 PM

Hey kiddo- school teacher incognito here. Nice attempt at getting everyone here on L/J to do YOUR homework. Of course asking experts for help is always a good idea and is a good strategy.. BUT.. this is a basic assignment, that asks basic questions that can be answered by google.com. Asking for help should NEVER BE YOUR FIRST STRATEGY (unless of course you are bleeding profusely from a major artery.) I see the members here are graciously helping you out, but I won’t because you should be helping yourself. Researching a topic is not difficult and it is an excellent way to enhance your reading comprehension skills and it will provide you with long term memory/recall of the topic. Noone can build your shop project for you, and noone should be doing your shop homework for you. When buiding, creating, fixing things there are many times you will have to go to the books to find a solution (or many solutions.) Now go do YOUR homework. And have a good day. :) PS Below is an example of what can happen when you rely upon others to do your homework. You will notice that I restated the question and used complete sentences – capital letters and punctuation.
1. What is it? a. Does the tool have a nickname? This tool is a cheese grater.
2. What is the tool used for? This tool is used to grate cheese.
3. Does this tool come in different sizes? a. Made with different materials? b. Is this tool part of a set?
Cheese graters sometime come in kitchen tool sets. Cheese graters can be made of plastic, aluminum or stainless steel. Stainless is always better. Cheese graters come in various shapes and sizes. Some are flat and fit over a bowl, others are trapeziodal. I have even seen cheese graters shaped like a triangle!
4. How can the tool hurt you? This tool can hurt if you scrape your knuckles on it while grating cheese. It can also hurt you when your mother plows you in the head with it for not doing your homework.
5. What should you not do with this tool? You shoud not grate cheese with this tool. You should not use this tool as a weapon- not even in self defense- especially against your mother.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 2520 days


#8 posted 09-11-2010 04:18 PM

I actually own all of the versions that Swirt has produced pictures of plus one more he has not included. Have I mentioned that I am a tool addict? I don’t have much to add to what has already been said and besides, it is YOUR homework. I very seldom use these tools because, as has been said, they are only used for roughing and most of the time, there are more efficient ways to do it. My wife uses them more often than I do in her plaster sculpture/carving work (yes, I bought her her own set). It is a pretty efficient tool for removing material in this instance and the surface left behind is a bit better than that left on wood. This does bring a question to my mind. Has anyone used one of these tools on mdf? I wonder if it would work better on mdf than on natural wood since you don’t have the grain fibers to tear out? I can see where that might be handy on occasion. It might be worth a try.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2432 days


#9 posted 09-11-2010 09:02 PM

Pretty much just turns MDF into fuzz. A good sharp plane is much better. #0000 sand paper about the same.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2494 days


#10 posted 09-12-2010 01:18 AM

Hey Doc:

Okay! Which Surfs didn’t “I”.....show?

The 10 inch Flat?Surf 10in Flat 320x240

Or the 7-1/4” Shaver?Surf 7.25 320x240

I’ve also used my “Little One” on MDF Numerous times. IMHO it does a very good job and as said before you can “Shape” Corners, Edges, Ends quite easily.

rivergirl: I agree with what you have stated 100%! Cheese Graters ARE a lot more dangerous than Surforms!

UUHHMMMM newbie, are you still with us? No Comments?

Rick

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View newbiewoodworker's profile

newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2288 days


#11 posted 09-12-2010 03:03 AM

Ahh yea sorry.. my neighbor forgot to pay his internet bill… so the router I was leaching off got disconnected.. Long story short I had to hop on another computer thats hardwired into the net to use it… (Our router is a PITA to setup when something happens..)

River: I obviously would know when someone posted something culinary as opposed to woodworking… also, it wasnt so much as wanting people to do my work for me, its more of guide me to what the uses are. Its supposed to be a simple oral presentation, but rather than spending hours on google, why not ask people who actually may have used it… its similar to asking someone in person… just easier…

But thanks guys, I do appreciate it… Now I can actually explain what it is without sounding like the kid who couldnt give a 20 word presentation on what a speed-square is….

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View derosa's profile

derosa

1568 posts in 2296 days


#12 posted 09-12-2010 03:17 AM

And before the internet we were told to check the encyclopedia. Experts exist to show you how to properly use it and give ideas on how to use it better. The preliminary work is all yours, you learn better when you have to do some of the work.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2494 days


#13 posted 09-12-2010 03:38 AM

Hours on Google????

I fed in “Surform” the one at the top of there list is where ALL the above Pictures came from. Took them off (Save Picture As), into My Computer, Cleaned up, into Photobucket, less than 15 Minutes later they are on here!

You LEARN how to do that when you do it yourself! “derosa” On the Button!!

“But thanks guys, I do appreciate it… Now I can actually explain what it is without sounding like the kid who couldnt give a 20 word presentation on what a speed-square is….” 20 WORD Presentation? Speed Square?

You’ve also got THREE POSTS Running on “Needing Advice” on how to finish your Workbench!! I replied at length on at least one of those.

It’s a WASTE of my Time and other LJ’ers who are on here to help “Woodworkers” that REALLY need help.

No more from me. Have a Nice Day.

Rick

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 2520 days


#14 posted 09-12-2010 04:59 AM

Swirt, the small one is the one that I was referring to. And actually, the larger one that I have is a little different than the one that you put up. Mine has a handle that will pivot so that it can function like a plane and like a file. Kind of like the 10” flat and the 10” plane in one tool. Also I have a flat blade and a half round blade that fits it. Did I mention that I have a tool collecting addiction? Is there such a thing as Tool-A-Holics Anonymous? Naah! Never mind. If I didn’t spend the money on tools, I would probably just buy beer. That would be bad.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View swirt's profile

swirt

2117 posts in 2433 days


#15 posted 09-12-2010 05:46 AM

Not me Doc, you mean Rick.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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