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Help with a euro hinge disaster

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Forum topic by JADobson posted 01-30-2017 12:24 AM 1516 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JADobson

918 posts in 1943 days


01-30-2017 12:24 AM

Good evening jocks,
Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions for this problem. My three year old decided to hang off a cabinet door in my kitchen and pulled the door right out of the cabinet side. Took quite a lot of the substrate with the hinge. I’ve never used these materials before but thought if could fill the gap with epoxy and put as much back into place as I can. I’m hoping the epoxy will be strong enough to hold the hinge in place. Any help would be appreciated.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany


18 replies so far

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9602 posts in 3480 days


#1 posted 01-30-2017 12:34 AM

I would drill it out and plug with dowels,
then flush cut the dowels off, remove
the plastic inserts from the screws and
re-install from there.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

633 posts in 1372 days


#2 posted 01-30-2017 12:35 AM

I would try to drill larger holes to where the screws went in, glue/epoxy some hardwood dowels in the holes, then drill for the right size screws for the hinge into the hardwood and attach. Whether that’s the “proper” thing to do or not, I couldn’t tell you, but I know would try it.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

310 posts in 2047 days


#3 posted 01-30-2017 12:43 AM

If i was doing this repair, I wouldn’t worry too much about the look of the final repair, but more about how solid the repair was.

My solution would be to take a 1/2” forstner bit and drill a hole at the location of each screw hole, making sure not to go all the way through the door. Then buy some 1/2” dowel and glue the dowel into the hole. You’ll end up with a nice solid mounting point for the screws.

If the torn out section bother you, just fill it with wood putty that’s a close match. Since you have solid mounting for the screws, this will be cosmetic only.

The forstner holes are probably best drilled with a drill press with the depth locked so you don’t drill through, but you could probably also use a 1/2” bit in a plunge router if you clamp the router base down with the proper setting on the depth stop.

Hand held drill would work, but be careful with the depth.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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Mike_D_S

310 posts in 2047 days


#4 posted 01-30-2017 12:43 AM

@Loren and Rayne,

Guess we were all typing at the same time.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

370 posts in 421 days


#5 posted 01-30-2017 12:47 AM

I hate chipboard!

The correct fix is to replace the kitchen. Barring that the hinge pocket needs to be redrilled in solid material and the hinge relocated. You need a drillpress with a 35 mm (1-3/8”) Forstner bit. Drill 13/16” in at new location on door. Hold hing in place and drill the two #6 mounting holes – all 1/2” deep. Install hinge on door. Get helper to hold door in place while you mark cabinet side mtg holes. Predrill cabinet #8 and mount. Make sure the hinge tips go on each side of the frame (NA for frameless mount).

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waho6o9

8025 posts in 2409 days


#6 posted 01-30-2017 12:54 AM

I’d add a 1/2 thick piece of hardwood 3” wide and use new hinges. assuming the door part is
okay.

There’s a plethora of hinge designs these days and you can mount them on the hardwood and be done.

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waho6o9

8025 posts in 2409 days


#7 posted 01-30-2017 01:02 AM

Blum works well. I just go to the supply house and explain what I need to do and they bring out a couple of
different hinges and it always works out.

It’s similar to a face frame euro hinge install:

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

633 posts in 1372 days


#8 posted 01-30-2017 01:02 AM



@Loren and Rayne,

Guess we were all typing at the same time.

Mike

- MikeDS

My thoughts exactly. At least we universally agree on the solution. lol.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1848 posts in 732 days


#9 posted 01-30-2017 01:14 AM

I would tape off around the tear out as close as you can, Then fill with either bondo (my first choice) or wood filler.
Then I would drill and install dowels as mentioned.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

918 posts in 1943 days


#10 posted 01-30-2017 01:23 AM


@Loren and Rayne,

Guess we were all typing at the same time.

Mike

- MikeDS

My thoughts exactly. At least we universally agree on the solution. lol.

- Rayne

Thanks for the help everyone, this looks the path I’ll follow. Will there be any concern in glueing the dowels to the chip board? will regular yellow glue hold everything together?

I hate chipboard!

Yup.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1969 posts in 422 days


#11 posted 02-01-2017 06:09 AM

If you can get a clamp on it, I’d epoxy it back in as-is.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2777 days


#12 posted 02-01-2017 06:47 AM

I’d just router and chisel out a square, then insert plywood with good old yellow glue. When dry, I’d re-drill the three holes and it should be good to go.

I did this on a MUCH bigger scale when repairing a heritage home door and no one could tell the repair had been done.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3624 posts in 2141 days


#13 posted 02-01-2017 07:57 AM



I d just router and chisel out a square, then insert plywood with good old yellow glue. When dry, I d re-drill the three holes and it should be good to go.

I did this on a MUCH bigger scale when repairing a heritage home door and no one could tell the repair had been done.

- Kelly

It the base plate on the cabinet (not the door) Just need what Loren and some other said.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4489 posts in 2037 days


#14 posted 02-01-2017 11:00 AM

You could just relocate the hinge.

-- Regards Robert

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3624 posts in 2141 days


#15 posted 02-01-2017 04:57 PM

No need to relocate the hinge. If you do, then you have to deal with 3 holes on the back of the door.

I worked of over 18 years at our local school District in the maintenance dept. In that time I repaired many hinge
like that, that pulled out of the cabinet. Keep it simple and do what Loren said. That’s all the really needs to be done.

This is a “keep it simple project’’.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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