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Silicone lubricants? Do you use them.

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Forum topic by pontic posted 01-28-2017 05:52 AM 909 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pontic

634 posts in 753 days


01-28-2017 05:52 AM

Teflon or Silicone “Dry Lubes” were introduced to me about two years ago at a woodworking show. Since then I use them a lot.
They do seem to help cut the wood better and make the bearings and gears work smoother.
Who uses it and are there any other god uses that you have that you can share with us. Are there any things to watchout for?

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum


23 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2524 days


#1 posted 01-28-2017 06:05 AM

Silicone lubricant in a woodworking shop is generally discouraged. I use a teflon lubricant on my tablesaw trunnions but I can’t see that it works any better than oil or wax.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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papadan

3584 posts in 3513 days


#2 posted 01-28-2017 06:08 AM

I use 3in1 oil on my machines when needed, other wise I keep lubes of all types away from my wood.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7191 posts in 3512 days


#3 posted 01-28-2017 06:12 AM

I stay away from silicon lubricants in my wood shop as much as possible!
The only time I use silicon is on the cars or my lawnmower.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Kelly

2092 posts in 3089 days


#4 posted 01-28-2017 06:17 AM

I find the nay saying about silicone to be more paranoia than fact. In forty years, I’ve never lost a finish to it. Of course, I don’t recommend lubricating your wood with it to get easier cuts. I wouldn’t be without it or Teflon.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1046 days


#5 posted 01-28-2017 06:45 AM

I am starting to think that paste wax is one of the best lubes for woodworking machinery when applicable . I bought some good teflon spray when I first got my unisaw, Doesn’t seem to last long.

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MrUnix

6930 posts in 2343 days


#6 posted 01-28-2017 06:57 AM

I am starting to think that paste wax is one of the best lubes for woodworking machinery when applicable . I bought some good teflon spray when I first got my unisaw, Doesn t seem to last long.
- DirtyMike

Or just go to the source and use paraffin wax… Johnsons is basically just paraffin suspended in naptha, with a little ‘Microcrystalline’ and Carnauba thrown in for good measure. You can get a pound of it at the grocery store for a buck or two, which will last a really long time. Great lubricant, prevents rust, and won’t attract saw dust.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4494 posts in 2454 days


#7 posted 01-28-2017 07:06 AM



I am starting to think that paste wax is one of the best lubes for woodworking machinery when applicable . I bought some good teflon spray when I first got my unisaw, Doesn t seem to last long.
- DirtyMike

Or just go to the source and use paraffin wax… Johnsons is basically just paraffin suspended in naptha, with a little Microcrystalline and Carnauba thrown in for good measure. You can get a pound of it at the grocery store for a buck or two, which will last a really long time. Great lubricant, prevents rust, and won t attract saw dust.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


Must no be any inflation where you live, 7 bucks a pound at HD here.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/SC-Johnson-1-lb-Fine-Wood-Paste-Wax-00203/100154748

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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MrUnix

6930 posts in 2343 days


#8 posted 01-28-2017 07:17 AM

Must no be any inflation where you live, 7 bucks a pound at HD here.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/SC-Johnson-1-lb-Fine-Wood-Paste-Wax-00203/100154748
- AlaskaGuy

That link is for paste wax, not paraffin :)

Gulf Wax (paraffin) can be found in the canning section of the store, or even wallyworld. I don’t think I’ve ever seen it sold at the BORG.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Check the MSDS for Johnsons here. It’s listed as 75-85% naptha, and only 10-30% paraffin, and 5-10% caranuba. So you are only getting, at most, 1/3 of a pound of paraffin :)

PSS: The newer format SDS for Johnsons just lists all waxes together as between 10-30%

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View TheTurtleCarpenter's profile

TheTurtleCarpenter

1052 posts in 1210 days


#9 posted 01-28-2017 07:20 AM

What Brad is referring to,,,,,I buy this at the local Kroger, no shipping cost

-- "Tying shoelaces was way harder than learning to Whistle"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5094 posts in 2638 days


#10 posted 01-28-2017 12:23 PM

Silicone is not allowed in any form in my shop, for the reasons mentioned above. If you go looking for the paste wax, be aware it’s normally considered a floor wax, and probably displayed with the floor care products.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View GreenIsle's profile

GreenIsle

7 posts in 637 days


#11 posted 01-28-2017 02:11 PM

It’s really good for door locks and hinges. Also, like to use it on the garden tools, but never tried it in woodworking.
Like I said though… great for a squeeking door.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8421 posts in 2721 days


#12 posted 01-28-2017 02:14 PM

I’ll give the Gulf Wax a try, thanks Turtle.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

398 posts in 764 days


#13 posted 01-29-2017 04:08 PM

Just about any kind of wax will work just fine. I’ve been using Golf Wax for a couple of years now without a problem. A few swipes on a plane bottom and you’ll be amazed. Previously I had used candles, but I like the block shape of the Golf Wax better. Doesn’t roll off the bench. Also works well on screw threads. For fine screw threads, I keep a carpenters pencil handy for easy to control graphite lubrication. Paste wax is a little easier to spread on tool tables. Been using Johnsons for that for many years.

Recently added a Paul Sellers rag in a can soaked with 3in1 oil to my arsenal. Seems to be giving the waxes a run for their money in effectiveness and ease of use. Paul has a video showing how to construct on his website, but I don’t recall off hand what he called it.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

392 posts in 733 days


#14 posted 01-29-2017 08:51 PM

Silicone will contaminate finishes and cause orange peel or wrinkle.

The naptha in Johnson’s cuts the old layer helping prevent build up. It also makes it soft enough to hand spread as a finish.

M

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2092 posts in 3089 days


#15 posted 01-29-2017 09:05 PM

Again, I’ve used silicone around my wood projects for forty years and have never lost one to orange peel or fish eye problems. That I’ve never used a silicone based wax on anything but a car (to the dismay of some future dent repairer) aside, I’ve flooded my table tops (spindle sander, drum-disk sander, band saw, cabinet saw) with it many times over the decades. I just wipe all the excess off and go to work.

The reason I’ve flooded a table top with silicone spray (oil free) was to float rust [from sweat or a boo boo] off, and it did what nothing else I had available would do for that. Afterward, the biggest problem I had was, too little friction. A board tossed on the table top tended to keep going – right off the table top.

Key to not suffering the fish eye problem was, again, wiping it all off. When I did, I wiped as if I was trying to wipe it all off. Even after that, enough was left on the iron to lubricate, but not enough was left to cause a problem on oak, pine, fir or cedar.

To be fair, I do not use silicone as my protector because it doesn’t do that good a job against the late friend who sat a coke can on a top, or the occasional drop of sweat. Corrosion X, on the other hand, does, and lasts longer than several coats of wax. However, you still need something over it to reduce friction. That’s were the wax or paraffin is helpful, if not something like TopCoat.

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