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Forum topic by rlrjr posted 09-09-2010 04:32 AM 1063 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rlrjr

65 posts in 2306 days


09-09-2010 04:32 AM

Good evening to all. As I may have mentioned before I have transformed a small trailer with a 12’ x 24’ (+_) room that I built on the side of it around 27 years ago. We now live in a modular house on the front of the property. For 3 1/2 years I just let the trailer and room sit there so back in June I decided to turn it into a small one-man workshop even though any carpentry experience that I have was doing rough carpentry in home building. (Framing and roofing).
I put a layer of 1/2” plywood on top of the existing floor of the trailer, coated it with Kilz sealer and put a good coat of polyurethane oil based paint on top of it. Trying to save some money, out in the room I put down a layer of 3/4” tongue and groove MDF (considerably cheaper than ply), coated it with Kilz and painted it with the same paint that I used in the trailer. 3-4 weeks went by before I got back out there to continue on and I built two layout tables, one in the front of the trailer and one in the back (trailer is 8’x28’) using 2×2’s for the framing (3 1/2 sides extended to the interior walls of the trailer), used left over MDF and put down white formica on both tables. I weigh 163 pounds and I climbed up on both tables, on my hands and knees and moved around a bit and nothing creaked or sagged so it looks like it will support whatever light weight activity I do in there. Actually I plan to use the back table for storage of small items that I will build while both may be used for light assembly work.
This past weekend I installed 4 fluorescent light fixtures with two tubes in each that I bought at Home Depot. I wired them in series, put in a wall switch and tied it into a wall socket that has its own 15 amp circuit breaker outside in the electrical box. When I got through with the installation I flipped the circuit breaker and went in and flipped on the switch. Having limited experience with electricity I didn’t know quite what to expect but all lights came on right off the bat! ( I did considerable research on the net to find out how to wire in a series of lights. What a gift the internet is if you use it for the right purposes.) I certainly do not have a problem with not having enough light to work with!
Last night I downloaded a free plan for a basic work table from www.renovation-headquarters.com/plans-workbench.html. It was written by Sandor Nagyszalanczy (first time I’ve heard his name) but his basic work bench looked like something that i could build since I only still have a skilsaw, a broken Delta chop saw, a 1/4” palm router and some hand tools.
Today I spent 1 1/2 hours in Home Depot buying all the parts in his list. The plan called for a 1” top made of plywood but Home Depot had a sale on 3/4” AC ply so I bought two 4×8 pieces, had one of the associates there cut them to size (better than using my skilsaw at home) and I finished up by buying all the rest of the parts listed in his parts list.
When I got home I put some painters plastic on the floor, covered both sides of the ply with titebond II wood glue and since I don’t have any clamps I laid three 2×6’s length ways on top of the boards and put 9 cement blocks on top of them to give good compression (I hope) while they dry.
So, that’s where I am this evening. The guy at Home Depot cut both sheets of ply at the same time so when I laid them on top of each other I was able to line them up to within 1/16 of an inch of all sides being right on top of the other. The plans only called for one sheet of ply but I figured that two would give a very solid top. The posts will be 4×4’s with 2×6 runners and end pieces held together with nuts and bolts.
I’ll take some pictures tomorrow and post them. This should give all the actual woodworkers a pretty good laugh.
One last thing before I go: what can I use to seal the plywood top that would reduce wear and tear and keep glue from sticking to it while not contaminating other wood projects that I might work on? I’d rather not put a laminate on it because the ply looks really good and has no defects?
Thanks for listening. Look forward to your ideas for sealing the top of the plywood.

-- When I works, I works hard. When I sits, I sits loose. And when I thinks I falls asleep.--


7 replies so far

View MickeyD's profile

MickeyD

130 posts in 2993 days


#1 posted 09-09-2010 06:19 AM

I don’t know what other LJ’s might suggest for the sealing of the plywood, but Kindlingmaker waxes my workbench every now and then and it works to make clean up easy.

-- -Willing to try

View terrilynne's profile

terrilynne

834 posts in 2360 days


#2 posted 09-11-2010 02:55 AM

You might try a urethene sealer. When you’re gluing up a project keep a damp sponge handy to wipe up any drips.

-- Terri, Rocky Mountain High Colorado!

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3027 days


#3 posted 09-11-2010 03:04 AM

I have about 5 coats of Polyurethane on my assembly table (solid core birch door) and it ilooks beautiful and is holding up well. Glue doesn’t stick to it. When it gets to looking bad I plan to sand it lightly and recoat it. (That’s why I put so many coats on it – so I could resand it in the future without hitting the veneer of the door.)

-- Joe

View MOJOE's profile

MOJOE

548 posts in 2735 days


#4 posted 09-11-2010 04:22 AM

If you were willing to cover the ply, a piece of 1/8” hardboard (shiny side up) would work well. When it gets beat up, just remove it and put on another piece.

-- Measuring twice and cutting once only works if you read the tape correctly!

View Walt's profile

Walt

213 posts in 2305 days


#5 posted 09-13-2010 06:27 PM

I agree with MoJoe. I have 1/8” hardboard on my assembly table and have coated it with a light coat of Johnsons floor wax(i use the same wax for my table saw) Glue does not stick and any friction mat still works. I recently recieved some bench cookies from Rockler and they do not slip at all. And as Mojoe said if it gets beat up I just have to remove several screws and it is replaced.

-- Walt Wilmington Delaware, http://waltlumley@yahoo.com

View Walt's profile

Walt

213 posts in 2305 days


#6 posted 09-13-2010 06:28 PM

I agree with MoJoe. I have 1/8” hardboard on my assembly table and have coated it with a light coat of Johnsons floor wax(i use the same wax for my table saw) Glue does not stick and any friction mat still works. I recently recieved some bench cookies from Rockler and they do not slip at all. And as Mojoe said if it gets beat up I just have to remove several screws and it is replaced.

-- Walt Wilmington Delaware, http://waltlumley@yahoo.com

View rlrjr's profile

rlrjr

65 posts in 2306 days


#7 posted 09-13-2010 07:55 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions. I think that I’ll go with the 1/4” hardboard. I’ve got to put a hardwood edge around the top and then I’ll post some photos.

-- When I works, I works hard. When I sits, I sits loose. And when I thinks I falls asleep.--

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