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Forum topic by pmcustom posted 01-27-2017 11:44 PM 796 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


01-27-2017 11:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shop workshop dedicated floorplan floor workspace stationary building

I will soon be breaking ground on a dedicated 32×48 detached workshop and need some advice. Can any experienced woodworkers give me some constructive criticism on my floorplan? I have an addiction to old cast iron machines, so I really want to get the placement right as much as possible, at least for the bigger stationary tools. Disregard the metalworking room since I don’t own most of them yet…they’re possible future purchases.

I want to be efficient with the DC ducting, so I’m planning to put similar-use machines in clusters around the shop (shaper and molder, belt sander and oscillating spindle sander, etc…)

I also tried to arrange machines according to their purpose in the workflow. The jointer and planer are right next to the rough lumber, which is right next to the overhead door; The tablesaws are roughly in the middle (stronger rip saw closer to the jointer, general purpose unisaw closer to the sheet goods); The profiling tools are all clustered together as well (router table, shaper and molder).

I also like to buy old machines and fix them (either for upgrade or resale) so the open area in front of the overhead door is for miscellaneous stuff like that.

Am I leaving too much space around the tools? Would you arrange anything differently and for what reasons?

Thank you for your input!


16 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#1 posted 01-28-2017 12:52 AM

Are the bandsaw and drill press compatible next to each other? Mine are about the same height, so I placed them separately. If they are on mobile bases it might not matter. Plus you seem to have plenty of space to scoot things around as needed.

I just hard piped a cyclone system, and you want to have your tool layout pretty dialed in before you get out the pop rivets and foil tape. Otherwise you will be tempted to leave long lengths of flex hose between the drop and the tool, which isn’t too good.

Overall, the size and layout makes perfect sense to me. Looks good.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 365 days


#2 posted 01-28-2017 01:38 AM

The metal shop is small, I would turn the finishing room in to more metal shop/machine rebuild space. The reason for that is that you want big gaps around the mill and lathe even more than a woodworking tool. That space is good for storing tooling and other things you want to keep out of the dust. By the way your corner placement of the milling machine is a bad idea and you want several feet to the left of the lathe clear so pieces can hang out of the headstock.

I would move the finishing room down to the bottom so it is close to the roll up door making it easier to get big pieces out of the shop.

If at all possible, add a bathroom.

You have a lot of space, try not to wind up with an oversized wood shop and a dysfunctional metal shop.

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a1Jim

116592 posts in 3416 days


#3 posted 01-28-2017 03:00 AM

Instead grouping equipment for just for dust collection I think workflow should be the top priority .I would place two table saws end to end rather than opposing each other that way you could have a long outfeed table available as additional work space. I also like sheet goods storage close to the overhead door for easy off loading of heavy sheet goods and I like my table saws close enough to the sheet goods that I can tilt a full sheet out of storage and tilt it onto the edge of my table saw top. I also would like my jointer and planner to be close to my table saw so that the material coming off of them can go directly to the table saw for easy planning /jointing then ripping. I think the drill press and band saw should be at least 8ft apart. It’s always great to state ideal situations but sometimes the amount of equipment makes what someone plans impossible.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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MrStyle

82 posts in 1569 days


#4 posted 01-28-2017 01:09 PM

I would consider a small bathroom or at a minimum a utility sink. I also agree that the sheet good storage should be right at the door.

Other than that – wheels on everything so when you change your mind you got options.

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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


#5 posted 01-28-2017 01:30 PM

Thanks for all the great input. The bandsaw and drill press were just dropped anywhere on the wall without any thought, so disregard those. I can put stuff like that wherever I want along the wall. I see now that I should definitely put all the lumber storage close to the front overhead door, so I will move the sheet-goods storage next to the cutoffs. As for the metalworking room, I have removed it for now. I don’t want to focus on that since it’s just a future possibility. Also, the drawing doesn’t show it but there will be a small overhead door on the back wall for easier entrance into the finishing room if I need it.

I didn’t have the most recent drawing on me yesterday, so here is a more current one (I still have to move the sheet-goods storage).

What do you think about the size of the finishing room?

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

230 posts in 372 days


#6 posted 01-28-2017 01:51 PM

I agree with Jim, you should take into account work flow. Your materials should come in make a circular course around the shop and leave as a finished project.

You have joiner and planer at 90 degrees to the door. this shuts off flow.
wood in, milled, to the saw and then the bench. Bench to finish, finish to bench for final assembly and then back out the door.

sanders, bandsaw, lathe, sharpening area, drill press etc. are most likely to be used from the bench and should be near it, but far enough apart that they are not in each other’s way.

Table saws back to back is a good idea and should work well. I like the router table near the bench. Hand tool and fastener storage should be near the bench as well.

compressor or dust collector are best kept in a separate room to reduce noise. you have done this.

also, I hate wheels. I find myself chasing machinery across the room or finding they don’t work as promised, and the unit is now stuck in a corner.

Just my opinion, Looks to me like you’ll have a lot of fun and that’s the important part.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


#7 posted 01-28-2017 02:12 PM


...You have joiner and planer at 90 degrees to the door. this shuts off flow…

I ‘m not sure I understand what you’re saying here. Can you elaborate? The jointer, planer and lumber storage are all within 10’ of each other, which I thought would flow well. If you’re suggesting that the planer and joiner should be in front of the door, I would rather leave that space open for the machines that I buy/sell and for other misc projects. I want room to back a trailer in and load/unload. What specific changes would you suggest?

Thanks again for all the input!

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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


#8 posted 01-28-2017 02:23 PM



...wheels on everything so when you change your mind you got options.

Wheels aren’t in the plans for the big stuff, which is one reason why I’m putting so much thought into the floorplan. I have some large and very heavy machines :)

Anyone have any thoughts on the size of the finishing room?

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2708 posts in 3277 days


#9 posted 01-28-2017 02:26 PM

I didn’t read all replies so maybe it’s been addressed here.

Planer? I don’t see one.

The ‘chip’ making tools really need dust collection. planer, shaper, jointer for example. You’ll need a dust collection system and if those tools can be clustered more around it they will go into it better. Dust machines like sanders can be located further away as dust easily travels through pipes. I’ve got a smaller 1 hp dust collector. My chip makers are very close to it. All my waste gets sucked up because the travel is very short.

Also, and this is a personal choice. Woodworking benches are wonderful. I built one (posted here someplace) with all the bells and whistles. I eventually gave it to my son in law and built a larger, square, assembly bench the height of my table saw. It sits, on wheels, at the end of my saw as an outfeed table and everything gets put together on it. Some of my stuff often needs a wider space than a woodworking bench can provide. I found that I was assembling, gluing up panels much more than I was planing. Looks like you might have room for both. My space is 24×24’. Yours is much larger.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

230 posts in 372 days


#10 posted 01-28-2017 02:29 PM

The wood comes in the door. it must be turned 90 deg. to be jointed and planed. it must be turned another 90 deg. to be run through the table saw.

for example; You are making 200 linear feet of shoe molding in 12 foot lengths. This is easiest if you mill the wood to the correct thickness, straighten it on the joiner run the wide board through the shaper and then rip off the molding. Next you run it back across the joiner to remove the saw marks and the back through the molder and repeat until you have the required linear feet.

Turning those boards 90 deg. again and again is a pain. the job is much easier if you are not required to do it.

In shop design always consider work flow.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


#11 posted 01-28-2017 03:10 PM



The wood comes in the door. it must be turned 90 deg. to be jointed and planed. it must be turned another 90 deg. to be run through the table saw…Turning those boards 90 deg. again and again is a pain. the job is much easier if you are not required to do it.

Thanks for the input. I do plan to bury the ducting for the machines that aren’t on the wall, so that will make it much easier to maneuver. I’ve found there are pros and cons to each arrangement I try and there is never going to be a perfect one. I don’t see any way to rearrange the tools that would eliminate the need to turn, backtrack, walk around, etc… If you have any specific suggestions with my layout, I’m listening :)

Anyone have any input about the size of the finishing room? Or should I even have a dedicated room at all; Maybe I should have a ventilation fan and a curtain?

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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


#12 posted 01-28-2017 03:12 PM



The chip making tools really need dust collection. planer, shaper, jointer for example. You ll need a dust collection system and if those tools can be clustered more around it they will go into it better.

I have a 3hp DC with 6” ducting. I will have some longer runs, so I may need to upgrade in the future…time will tell.

View MrStyle's profile

MrStyle

82 posts in 1569 days


#13 posted 01-28-2017 04:02 PM

For the paint booth – what are you doing for ventilation in that area?

Woodwhisper has some pretty detailed videos when he build his dream shop that you might find some good information and considerations.

Any chance of having the DC exhaust outside?

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pmcustom

37 posts in 2639 days


#14 posted 01-28-2017 04:25 PM



For the paint booth – what are you doing for ventilation in that area?

Woodwhisper has some pretty detailed videos when he build his dream shop that you might find some good information and considerations.

Any chance of having the DC exhaust outside?
- MrStyle

I bought a paint booth at auction and stripped all the important stuff off it, so I will have a gigantic explosion proof fan (probably variable speed) exhausting outside. I also plan to vent the DC outside so I don’t have to worry about a clogged filter. I have a homemade separator that works well, but the filter still clogs up over the course of a year or so. I plan to have heated floors (hydronic) so I don’t expect to have any issues with exhausting conditioned air. I plan to put extra tubing in the floor of that room and possibly zone it separately down the road so I can keep it warmer if needed.

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

230 posts in 372 days


#15 posted 01-28-2017 11:13 PM

If it were me, I would put my band saw and drill press near the door of the spray room. Out of the way, but easily accessible to your bench. The spindle sander and edge sander should be near there by not really close to the finish room door. There could be dust problems.

I’d put the shaper against the wall where the band saw is in your first picture and put the plainer by the molder. give yourself a couple of feet on each side it’ll make your life easier. I think I’d move the table saws forward just a bit and put the joiner beside them. move your sheet goods and lumber storage to the front door. You have room for an upright panel saw in the front if you want add one. (Right by the sheet goods.)

You might want to add a cut off saw on the right hand side. A sliding miter saw works and if it’s convenient to your bench you’ll find it a pleasure.

This will give you plenty of room by the front door for loading and unloading

I’m spoiled when it comes to finish areas. The one where I work is 24’x40’. The booth area is 16’x10’. and yes we have painted cars in it. (a 1936 ford truck) I think any dedicated finish area is better than none. The shop I am building at my house will not have one. I am working on plans for a curtain that will block off an area and then I will rig an exhaust fan in a window. My whole shop will be 24’x30’.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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