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Butcheblock or not butherblock?

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Forum topic by Carloz posted 01-27-2017 10:59 PM 423 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


01-27-2017 10:59 PM

This seems to be an eternal question. I think I am capable of cutting and trimming a granite slab for my 8’x3’ kitchen island myself but I really like how wooden ( I plan glue regular width 8/4 walnut boards) countertops look.
However the only sink in the kitchen in in that island and it is used quite heavily.
So if lets say I finish it with waterlock how long should I expect the countertop to last ?
Maybe I should use surface mount versus undernmount sink ?


7 replies so far

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1703 days


#1 posted 01-27-2017 11:18 PM

If you want a perpetually dull knife, go with granite. If you want to keep that sucker sharp, use a wooden butcher block. ;-)

I’ve seen engrain, walnut countertops, leveled with a router sled, and they are amazing. I would really urge you to go in that direction.

I would also go surface mount (if I understand the question)...but it might mean picking a different sink.

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#2 posted 01-27-2017 11:18 PM

Surface mount on a wooden top without a doubt.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3661 posts in 2148 days


#3 posted 01-27-2017 11:20 PM

Just curios, are you capable of lifting that granite slab?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 01-27-2017 11:56 PM


Just curios, are you capable of lifting that granite slab?

- AlaskaGuy


3×8x1.5” granite is about 500lbs. Nothing special as long as someone helps you.

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Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


#5 posted 01-27-2017 11:58 PM


I ve seen engrain, walnut countertops, leveled with a router sled, and they are amazing. I would really urge you to go in that direction.
- UncannyValleyWoods

Router sled – poor man’s hand plane.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#6 posted 01-28-2017 03:15 AM

Carloz,

Our master bath vanity top is 3/4” thick pine (white pine I think) with a surface mounted cast iron sink. It was stained and then coated with polyurethane and installed 12 years ago. Although the bathroom sink does not see the duty of a kitchen sink, we are sometimes careless about wiping up any standing water that splashes onto the vanity top. The vanity top shows no signs of problems, although I cannot inspect the area under the rim of the sink.

Since walnut is more rot resistant than pine, I think a walnut countertop would stand the test of time if well protected. Well protected would require finish applied to the underside to the top as well as the top side. The cabinet space under the sink can get very humid and that high humidity acting on the unprotected underside of the top could wreak havoc.

I would lean toward an under mount sink in the kitchen. However, the exposed end grain would have to be well sealed and the sink properly mounted to ensure the countertop would last. My preference for the under mount sink is that it allows you to keep an eye on the condition of the countertop and take action before any problems get out of hand. For example, if the end or edge grain finish around the sink begins looking dull, a refresher coat of polyurethane could be applied.

If you elect to go with a wooden countertop with a surface mounted sink, it is important to ensure the sink is well sealed with caulk and then periodically refresh the caulk seal. I noticed when I demoed our old kitchen the particle board countertop around the rim of the sink had started to deteriorate presumably because the caulk around the rim of the sink had failed.

While five coats of polyurethane would be my finishing choice, I would be reluctant to do any chopping directly on a countertop finished with polyurethane.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2783 days


#7 posted 01-28-2017 05:03 AM

Why not both?

Oh, and and it could have gone without saying you don’t cut on any counter. No one knowledgeable of stone or quarts counters would consider cutting on them. Knives can be re-sharpened, but removing scratches from rock is a hassle. Add to that, even cutting on a butcher block counter is a debatable affair. That would be a lot more maintenance, cutting boards exist to protect counters.

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