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Question about spline miters for picture frames

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Forum topic by Camper posted 09-08-2010 03:50 AM 2548 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Camper

232 posts in 2324 days


09-08-2010 03:50 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw joining

When making miter joints with splines for a picture frame, after squaring the stock and cutting to appropriate lengths, which order is best to 1) cut the L shapes 2) cut the miters 3) cut the spline slots?

Also the spline jig I am looking at making requires that the mitered corner rides on the table saw at a 45 degree. So do I glue the mitered joints and then after I cut the spline slots, glue the spline in?

I am slightly uncertain as to what the best sequence is..thanks for looking and thanks for your suggestions in advance…by the way I am using a table saw for all this.

-- Tampa-FL


7 replies so far

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lew

11348 posts in 3223 days


#1 posted 09-08-2010 04:03 AM

I usually make/assemble the frame and then cut the spline slots. Glue in the splines and trim then sand and finish.

Not sure if this is the “correct” way but it works for me.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Camper

232 posts in 2324 days


#2 posted 09-08-2010 02:52 PM

thanks lev, also what do you do about the “V” groove left by the combination blade on the saw? It seems like the slot would be to thin to use a chisel to trim.

-- Tampa-FL

View FaTToaD's profile

FaTToaD

393 posts in 2609 days


#3 posted 09-08-2010 05:29 PM

I currently use a combination blade to cut miter splines because it’s the only blade I have. It does leave a small “V” groove, which I’ve tried to knock down with a very small file. If you’ve got a file that’s small enough to get in the groove, you could go that route. Lately, I’ve just left it alone and it’s not that noticeble, especially if you push the spline in with plent of force.

BTW, I saw a 10” blade at Lowes the other day that was ATB+F, can remember the brand, but it was around $30. I’m thinking of buying one just for splines.

-- David

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#4 posted 09-08-2010 07:28 PM

The “dab o’glue then sand at 150 grit” trick works good on those little voids. To see an unfilled void, you’d have to smash the side of your face against the wall and close your outboard eye. It’s a minor concern.

I don’t know what you mean by “cut the L shapes.”

I usually cut the miters, glue and clamp with a band clamp (Jorgenson 1”). You can get enough glue strength at that angle for the four pieces to hold together. Then I cut the slots with the frame vertical in my table saw jig.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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TominTexas

42 posts in 2304 days


#5 posted 09-08-2010 07:47 PM

Most of the combination blades as well as cross cut blades for your tablesaw have a small contour to the top of each tooth – that shape helps in the efficiency of cutting but also leaves a v or curved shape to the bottom of the saw kerf. Blades that are designated as “flat tooth” (most are rip blades) leave a flat bottom on the kerf and are ideal for cutting the slot to accommodate the spline. Freud makes several blades with flat teeth that are economically priced.

Tom

-- East Side of Big D

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Dez

1162 posts in 3545 days


#6 posted 09-08-2010 08:57 PM

All good advice, try using a rip blade for cutting the slots – they usually have a flat bottom cut!

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#7 posted 09-08-2010 09:05 PM

Try the rip blade on scrap to see how it exits. A chipout on the back side of your well-wrought frame is more problematic than the little teensy triangles left by a blade that is better behaved when it leaves the work.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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