LumberJocks

Oops...how to fix my Unisaw Starter!!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by dabldo posted 01-26-2017 05:39 PM 1199 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View dabldo's profile

dabldo

5 posts in 680 days


01-26-2017 05:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: delta unisaw magnetic starter

I finally purchased my first cabinet saw. I damaged it transporting it home…argh!!! More specifically, the electrical starter. It’s a Delta 3HP 1PH Unisaw, Model number 36-944 built in 1999. I’m fast learning not all starters are alike. Cruising the internet for a replacement, eReplacements, Renovo, etc., I quickly see this is not going to be an easy task to find a suitable replacement. I tried contacting Delta directly and they were not much help after I waited 35 minutes on hold to get through. I’m now contacting local companies here in Phoenix that handle motors and power transmission equipment for a solution. I’m nervous that I’ll get the wrong magnetic starter and burn up my motor.

What advice can anyone offer to get this fixed so I can start making some saw dust?

Thanks for reading and your support.

-- Dave


10 replies so far

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1076 days


#1 posted 01-26-2017 05:46 PM

I have the same switch on my unisaw, You may be better off just to replace the whole switch. I considered replacing mine with a Woodstock paddle switch when i first bought my saw. Brad will be along shortly with some sound advice.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7005 posts in 2373 days


#2 posted 01-26-2017 10:09 PM

Does it work at all? If it does, it would be cheapest and easiest to just try and glue on the broken part of the housing. If not, then given it’s an IEC type switch, you will likely just have to swap it out with another one.

Basically, any IEC type starter, rated for your motor, will work – it doesn’t need to be a Delta specific one. If you do want a Delta, the SawCenter has a replacement Delta switch for it that is slightly different but would work. There may be others… that was just the first one I ran across.

RenovoParts has a couple that would work here and here.

Unfortunately, the Delta specific ones will be pretty expensive (all the above are over $200). Grizzly has some that are a bit cheaper, like this one. You can also probably find some even cheaper on the bay. Just make sure it’s rated for your motor. Larger rated ones should work as well (most have a switch to set current limit for overload protection), but not smaller.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2103 posts in 3118 days


#3 posted 01-26-2017 11:02 PM

Whatever you do, stay with a magnetic starter. If you interrupt power, the saw will not come back on when the power is restored.

View Lee's profile

Lee

122 posts in 1052 days


#4 posted 01-27-2017 12:13 AM

Found this one on Amazon for 69.00 , 3HP 230volts single phase
https://www.amazon.com/Big-Horn-18823-220-240-Volt-18-26-Amp/dp/B002LVUWHM

-- Colombia Custom Woodworking

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2872 posts in 2199 days


#5 posted 01-28-2017 05:09 AM

I put one of the Grizzly starters on my Unisaw and it has been satisfactory.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1115 posts in 3787 days


#6 posted 01-28-2017 05:59 PM

If I was dealing with this…
1. the contactor and overload units don’t look damaged. They can be saved. You will probably find that they mount to the back of that shitty plastic box.
2. scrap them crappy switches on the front of the box. The start switch is probably just a momentary contact NO pushbutton and the stop switch can be an Estop locking type or just a momentary NC mushroom pushbutton switch.
3. Buy a decent metal box or a sealed heavy duty plastic wiring junction box (BUD, for instance), some new industrial switches and rebuild the circuit in it.

You will probably spend less money and get a better, sturdier unit than buying the same shitty replacement from Delta.

Just my $.02 worth.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View dabldo's profile

dabldo

5 posts in 680 days


#7 posted 01-31-2017 04:04 AM

Thanks everyone for your thoughts and ideas. I’ve been traveling so I’m a little slow responding. To be a bit clearer, the magnetic starter is damaged beyond any use or repair. The contactor and overload relay are both cracked, and cannot safely be used or repaired. So I am looking for a complete new magnetic starter with the proper sized contactor and overload relay. I’m a bit of a purest at heart and wanted all original equipment but I’ve gotten past that now.
I’ve learned a lot reading about this equipment on the internet and I’m entering what I would call the “dangerous zone” thinking I know what I’m doing, but hopefully realize I don’t!
Is it as simple as just getting any NEMA 1 starter that is rated for a ≈230 Volt 3 HP 1 Phase motor? Brad-I know you said that any IEC starter rated for my equipment would work. I also believe that the amperage operating range must be correct. I don’t want to get the wrong starter and end up burning up my motor.
What’s making me a bit nervous is that there is a fairly larger price range for what appear to be the same equipment from Big Horn, Powertech, Grizzly, Woodstock, Jessem, Allen Bradley, GE, etc.
So I’m in a bit of a quandary of what to get; i.e. does the higher price actually get me a better more reliable and safer piece of equipment.
I’m kind of rambling on here but do appreciate everyones comments and support!

Dave

-- Dave

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2103 posts in 3118 days


#8 posted 01-31-2017 05:01 AM

To give you and idea of how it works, replacement bearings for my Powermatic band saw guides run twenty dollars each through Powermatic. That would be two hundred dollars to replace the upper and lower guides. However, by going aftermarket, for the same bearings, I can buy eight for about five bucks and shipping.

Based on the foregoing, don’t let price be your guide, if the prices are from Delta.

As to amperage, we, essentially, have the same saw. Mine is an X5. It runs at about seven amps, but MIGHT start at fifteen (240VAC). As such, the post Lee suggested is a good bet.

It’s been a long time since I had my switch apart (since I swapped the stock cord for a twelve footer). Just photo the existing switch connections and repeat them on the new switch and you should be good to go.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7005 posts in 2373 days


#9 posted 01-31-2017 05:29 AM

Brad-I know you said that any IEC starter rated for my equipment would work. I also believe that the amperage operating range must be correct. I don’t want to get the wrong starter and end up burning up my motor.

Since you had an IEC starter, that is what I’d replace it with. All you need to worry about is what the FLA rating of your motor is… and get a starter that can handle that amperage. They have a dial switch that lets you set the overload current based on your motor – like on your original switch:

So you get the switch, and just dial in the current protection needed. As long as you can set it for the FLA of your motor, you are good to go.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View dabldo's profile

dabldo

5 posts in 680 days


#10 posted 01-31-2017 11:33 AM

Thanks for the advice guys.

Brad-Just curious, how could you tell that my old starter was an IEC rather than a NEMA style?

Dave

-- Dave

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com