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Sanding Belts - Storage Ideas Sought

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Forum topic by jimintx posted 01-24-2017 11:57 PM 1084 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jimintx

512 posts in 1422 days


01-24-2017 11:57 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sanding belts storage

I’m a little perplexed, trying got figure the best way to store some larger, longer, sanding belts for stationary sanding machines. I am referring to 1”x30” belts, and 6”x48” belts, although I also smaller belts for handheld belt sanders.

When these large size belts are purchased, there are often as many as half-a-dozen of them nested, which saves space but does deform the belts as they must be bent to get one in side the other.

Anyway, I’m sure this group gets what I’m trying to ask about, so if possible give me some of your ideas about how they might best be stored. Is it generally okay to leave them nested in groups of 2, or more.

The shop itself is climate controlled, so that helps with keeping the tape glue intact. I feel my shop is a bit lacking in wall space, but I could most likely move some things, and find some room to hang sanding belts.

-- Jim, Houston, TX


15 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6006 posts in 2037 days


#1 posted 01-25-2017 12:02 AM

Longish 6” peg board hanger works great for my 6×48’s (only sander I have).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4523 posts in 2042 days


#2 posted 01-25-2017 12:44 AM

I do not have anywhwere near the professional size equipment like yours, but

I learned some time ago leaving belts on under stress on the machine does them favours along with storing them beside the machine when its used outside the sun then fixes them up real quick.

And I also learned there is no effective way a home worker can repair the belts back to original reliability after the joint strip gives way.

No matter what tape glue or witches brew you use you get unreliable results, failing in work or the surface is uneven either way none are repaired to the level as made by the supplier.

Belt off the machine after use

Or stored when not used

You may have noticed in the middle of the group are scotch belts, have you tried these yet?
I have had great results from mine.

-- Regards Robert

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 1948 days


#3 posted 01-25-2017 02:13 AM

I store them in the roll away that holds the sander off the floor…

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 364 days


#4 posted 01-25-2017 06:59 AM

Harbor freight used to sell “tape holders” which you can screw to a wall and hold a roll of duct tape or 2” wide sanding belts which is how I used them.

6*48” belts are a pain. Years ago I worked in a shop where they were stored in a small pile next to the sander. We went through belts pretty fast and they were all 24 grit so we didn’t keep a collection of various grits or more than a couple used belts.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4515 posts in 976 days


#5 posted 01-25-2017 01:56 PM

My belt sander isn’t as big as yours but, I just leave the 4×36 belts nested and lay them on a shelf under the sander. Never had a problem but, I don’t use my sander all that often. I suppose if I used it every day, I may find there are problems with my method that I don’t currently find.

I must say that after reading what robscastle said^ that relaxing the tension on the belt when not in use makes good sense.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View BorkBob's profile

BorkBob

127 posts in 2530 days


#6 posted 01-25-2017 02:30 PM

I buy my 6×48 belts from Industrial Abrasives by the dozen every 1.5-2 yrs. I store them in the box they come in in a salvaged kitchen wall cabinet. Never had a problem.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 364 days


#7 posted 01-25-2017 10:34 PM

I would hesitate to relax tension on a belt sander, every time I do that it seems to run the belt in to the sander and mess up an edge (before I can adjust the tracking).

I’m lucky enough if I don’t mangle a brand new belt too bad.

View Jeff2016's profile

Jeff2016

115 posts in 702 days


#8 posted 01-25-2017 10:59 PM

My extra belts reside on the top shelf of a cabinet still nested as well.
I’ve never consider relaxing the belt tension on my sander either. Interesting….But if I had to adjust the tracking every time, that could get irritating quick.

I don’t believe I have ever had a belt fail prematurely from keeping them under tension, just might have to test out the theory.

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4523 posts in 2042 days


#9 posted 01-25-2017 11:18 PM

Guys I have a fairly complex workshop setup so if you check out picture No2 in my workshop it shows the original way I used the linisher.

I am not suggesting leaving them under tension is a single point of failure however add Mr sunshine and then the problems occur.

One day I was standing in front of my linisher and powered up and shortly after received a surprise turkey slap from a separating belt of which was definately a joint failure.

I swapped a belt from down below, a virgin one and fitted it up stood to one side powered it up and sure enough it tried to get me again with another turkey slap.

A total stock loss occured from all of them

-- Regards Robert

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2902 posts in 1826 days


#10 posted 01-25-2017 11:32 PM

I store them in plastic bags to reduce them from drying out especially in winter when humidity is very low.

View Jeff2016's profile

Jeff2016

115 posts in 702 days


#11 posted 01-26-2017 12:38 PM



Guys I have a fairly complex workshop setup so if you check out picture No2 in my workshop it shows the original way I used the linisher.

I am not suggesting leaving them under tension is a single point of failure however add Mr sunshine and then the problems occur.

One day I was standing in front of my linisher and powered up and shortly after received a surprise turkey slap from a separating belt of which was definately a joint failure.

I swapped a belt from down below, a virgin one and fitted it up stood to one side powered it up and sure enough it tried to get me again with another turkey slap.

A total stock loss occured from all of them

- robscastle

That makes sense. Lucky for me even in mid summer the sun can only stream in the windows of my shop for about an hour at best much thanks to the trees and hill I have to the west (which is the window wall in my shop).
Thanks for the clearer explanation.

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

331 posts in 797 days


#12 posted 01-26-2017 01:47 PM

It doesn’t matter stored,wrapped up or one or two. Climate controlled or not….

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

512 posts in 1422 days


#13 posted 01-26-2017 05:55 PM



It doesn t matter stored,wrapped up or one or two. Climate controlled or not….

I believe I mislead some readers. I wasn’t really asking about how to protect the glue/tape joints from climate issues. I intended to, and thought I had, written the original post it to say that was not an issue for my situation.

Really, I just wanted to learn some ideas about how others decide to physically store belts. I think the consensus is you can either stuff them in a drawer or cabinet, or hang them over something on the wall or from the ceiling. Also, it seems to be a non-issue to leave them nested, or at least nobody has suggested that is a bad idea.

Okay, thanks, and if there are any more real world storage ideas, I’ll appreciate seeing them.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

233 posts in 3556 days


#14 posted 02-07-2017 12:57 AM

Coated abrasives including belts need to be kept in a humidity controlled area and protected from dust and contaminants. In our case the shop is temperature controlled. Since we go through belts on a regular basis all we do is keep them covered with a bed sheet to keep the dust and contaminants off the belts.
Because of space issues our problem is keeping multiple grits on one rack of 6” belts. Our racks are PVC mounted to wall brackets with the various grits labeled on the end of the PVC.

-- Wuddoc

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4495 posts in 3081 days


#15 posted 02-07-2017 09:24 PM

I use 1×42 belts a lot and I keep them under tension. They have never come apart, but when they do decide to break, it’s because they are well worn and come apart at the taped joint. They just don’t fail under normal use, only when they are worn out and time to replace them anyway.

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