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Tormek for use indoors at the office?

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Forum topic by Slider20 posted 01-24-2017 02:06 AM 1185 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Slider20

119 posts in 355 days


01-24-2017 02:06 AM

I am very sensitive to dust, always wear a respirator in the shop even with dust collection. I am looking for a sharpening system to be able to keep next to my desk in my home office. The Tormek T8 is appealing as it keeps the metal dust in the water.

My main concern is the mess, is this system messy? will I get water all over while sharpening? Or does the area around stay dry and clean?

Also, how often do you need to change the water?

Thanks everyone.


10 replies so far

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3634 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 01-24-2017 02:43 AM

The system itself is not messy, mostly… I do not recommend leaving the water in it when not in use. The water stays in the tray while working unless you overfill it. As you add water the stone sucks it up so it takes alot of water to get ready to sharpen. If you are worried about water you could put this in a metal tray to catch any that might slop around such as moving it suddenly. They have knock offs of this system that are cheaper, how well they work in comparison to it I have no idea, mine is 10-12 years old and still works well so not looking for a replacement. Others with different set-ups may have better suggestions. At the time I bought this it was pricey, as are the jigs. That said me personally I have been satisfied with the results.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Slider20

119 posts in 355 days


#2 posted 01-24-2017 03:05 AM



The system itself is not messy, mostly… I do not recommend leaving the water in it when not in use. The water stays in the tray while working unless you overfill it. As you add water the stone sucks it up so it takes alot of water to get ready to sharpen. If you are worried about water you could put this in a metal tray to catch any that might slop around such as moving it suddenly. They have knock offs of this system that are cheaper, how well they work in comparison to it I have no idea, mine is 10-12 years old and still works well so not looking for a replacement. Others with different set-ups may have better suggestions. At the time I bought this it was pricey, as are the jigs. That said me personally I have been satisfied with the results.

- woodbutcherbynight

Thanks for the reply, good suggestion to keep it In a tub.

Also, why do you recommend taking the water out of the reservoir after use?

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 735 days


#3 posted 01-24-2017 03:07 AM

A turkey baster will make quick work of it.

View Matt's profile

Matt

159 posts in 784 days


#4 posted 01-24-2017 03:11 AM

I’ve got the cheap grizzly 10” version- i second everything above. stone sucks up a lot of water initially (every use) and is bad to leave the stone partially submerged (per my manual) when not in use (i.e. overnight or longer). I find that the amount of water spilled is relative to the edge size being sharpened. The longer the edge, the more likely the water ends up around the machine- chefs knives for example tend to be pretty messy for me. Dust however has not been a concern at all for me.

-- My "projects" always look better with beer goggles.

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Slider20

119 posts in 355 days


#5 posted 01-24-2017 03:25 AM



A turkey baster will make quick work of it.

- DirtyMike

Great idea, thanks.


I ve got the cheap grizzly 10” version- i second everything above. stone sucks up a lot of water initially (every use) and is bad to leave the stone partially submerged (per my manual) when not in use (i.e. overnight or longer). I find that the amount of water spilled is relative to the edge size being sharpened. The longer the edge, the more likely the water ends up around the machine- chefs knives for example tend to be pretty messy for me. Dust however has not been a concern at all for me.

- Matt

Interesting, I think I’m going to give it a shot.

Thanks everyone

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#6 posted 01-24-2017 03:53 AM


Also, why do you recommend taking the water out of the reservoir after use?

- Slider20

On the older tormeks the shafts would rust and bond to the stone.I might be wrong but it think the newer t8 have a stainless shaft that prevents this.
Tormek also has different wheels so it’s nice to have the option to switch out wheels.Im almost done with my second wheel on my 2000 model.I wa hoping it would die so I could justify buying a new one but it keep on ticking.
It’s a great machine and ya just dont know how much stuff you can sharpen with it till you have one.
Aj

-- Aj

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3634 posts in 2242 days


#7 posted 01-25-2017 03:12 AM

If you leave the water in it the metal from whatever you are sharpening will rust. Fail to clean the stone well and the rust will be very evident. Friend left his for two months, not pretty.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1422 posts in 1823 days


#8 posted 01-25-2017 08:47 PM

I have the Grizzly version. I set it in a lipped tray with a small drain hose going to a catch bottle. I use mostly Tormek jigs and accessories. The griz square edge jig actually works better than the Tormek. I just leave the water in the wheel tub to evaporate. The Tormech has 2 advantages 1) microadjust of the tool rest bar and 2) adding the shaped strops to the end of the shaft. The Griz shaft can be modified to take these. I didn’t, and still don’t, think those small differences were worth the 3x price difference.

You don’t mention what you plan to sharpen. The wet sharpener works well on O1 tool steels. It does not work very well with harder steels like A2 or HSS for wider edges like plane blades – narrow chisels (1/2” or so) of harder material do ok. It does great re-sharpening HSS turning tools, but any major shaping that requires much material removal is slow – I use a dry grinder for that. Also, I find that plane blades and chisels ground and stropped on the wet sharpener do not have the edge life of edges honed with ever finer grits. Even the supposed “fine” wheel surface leaves fairly coarse scratching compared to the 25 um and below abrasives I use for fine edges. Those initially sharp stropped but serrated edges break down significantly faster.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

476 posts in 959 days


#9 posted 01-26-2017 12:21 AM

I’ll add that most people probably don’t realize how slow that stone turns on the Tormek (and I assume the clones).

View SharonJMcCrary's profile

SharonJMcCrary

3 posts in 180 days


#10 posted 06-14-2017 09:26 AM

Yes, I too agree with teejk02.

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