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Help for cane chair seat (and source)

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Forum topic by mafe posted 1419 days ago 1123 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mafe

9435 posts in 1687 days


1419 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: chair seat cane prewoven cane help question refurbishing traditional

Hi all,
I bought some old chairs in Paris because I find them beautiful, and they were so light in waight and construction, that they impressed me.

But as you can see the seats are broken, and or really tired, so I want to put new seats.
I have no experience with this, but would like to do it my self…

Does anyone have some good diy books, guides or advice?
Does anyone know where I can buy the cane material for the seats, I heard it is possible to buy it prewoven?

Hope someone can be helpful,
MaFe

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.


15 replies so far

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#1 posted 1419 days ago

try here mads
they ship worldwide

http://woodworker.com/c-Caning/

and here is a hand book about the work

http://woodworker.com/fullpres.asp?PARTNUM=857-154

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1713 days


#2 posted 1419 days ago

Hello Mads
either you want the same look or a new look to the seats it isn´t so hard on theese kind of chairs
you can buy the same prewowen here in Denmark
I have two books about rstoring things and restore furnitures some where in a movingboks on the loft
they are on Danish I will dig them out so you can get the title and auther so you can borrow them
on the libary , I´ll Pm you

take care
Dennis

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3342 posts in 2558 days


#3 posted 1419 days ago

Those do not look to be seated with pre-woven cane.
Cornell University bulletin number 681 “Cane seats for chairs”-revised edition will give ya all you need to know. It takes some time, and your hands will remember the project for some time. Use glycerine in the water to soften the cane and make it easier on the fingers.
Cornell Univ.Resource Center
7 Business and Tech. Park
Ithaca, NY 14850
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 1893 days


#4 posted 1418 days ago

Hi Mads,
I have done caning on chairs.
There is a lot about caning that the books can’t tell you.
Like proper tension on the cane.
If you pull the cane too tight while it is wet, when it dries and shrinks, it tightens.
This can actually become so tight it can break the chair at the holes drilled for the cane.
My recommendation-
Before you try to cane the chair is to make a frame 12” x 12”, drill holes for the appropriate size cane,
and do a practice to see how you do. My dad taught me how to cane by doing this first. Gives you the “feel”
of tension, and how to twist and lay the cane coming through holes.

Here is where I buy my supplies.
Hope this helps,

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1687 days


#5 posted 1418 days ago

Hi,
Thank you David, wonderful source.
Dennis: do you know a Danish supplier.
Bill: I’ll try and look into this.
Lisa: Thank you a lot, I will get back to you if I run into questions.
I will do as you say, to make a frame, and make a test first, think this will be a clever investment in skills.
I have just offered a book of ‘making chair seats’ this book should cover most types including cane, so I look forward to make some reading.
The chairs are in Paris, so I have to bring them home two and two, but I can get started with the frame Lisa suggest. If I can not find a dealer in Denmark, I’ll order from one of your links.
Thank you a lot for the help, I’m full of confident now.
Best thoughts from my heart,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#6 posted 1418 days ago

that was a smart move ,
leaving the chairs in paris .

now you can go and be with
caroline again , LOL !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 1893 days


#7 posted 1417 days ago

Mafe,

The link I posted ships internationally. I think it is in the top left corner of the web page.
There are a bunch of flags, click on them.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

35 posts in 151 days


#8 posted 71 days ago

40yrs ago, right after I bought a used Shopsmith I saw an article about making a caned stool. So I learned to cane. Gave the finished stool to my sister in law who used it all over the world. Its final home was in the arid southwest where it started to lose its flex and started to break all the strands.
No problem, I would just recane it. Lugged it down to the shop, where I had the leftover cane.
What a diseaster. I knew the cane had to be damp, so I put a couple of strands in a bucket and let them set for a few minutes, figuring that was enough. Got the first row installed just fine. Second row , pulled the strand half
way through and it busted. Too dry. Gathered up the rest of the cane and put it a plastic container. Added a cup of water and fastened the lid down tight. Figured by morning that cane would be damp enough to start again.

Wrong. The cane had sucked up all the water, so I added 2 cups of water, waited til the next day, the container was dry again. Added another cup of water, Hooray, started again, making sure that I kept wetting it down with a spray bottle containing a few drops of glycerin and water. Got all the verticals done.
Time to quit. Stored the whole thing in a plastic bag with another cup of water and a few drops of glycerin and a damp cloth on top.

This time I will soak the strands 1/2 hour and keep my wet cloth on top.
More later.

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1045 posts in 1723 days


#9 posted 71 days ago

I may never do caning again.. I cut myself too many times on the sharp edges of the cane, but I was using a 1/4” wide strips.. I also learned the hard way about pulling the cane top tight and about how long to wet the cane. Never found it rewarding enough.. but I am very happy I learned how and could use it in other projects if needed.

I got all my supplies from Royalwood Ltd. they carry a lot more stuff than just cane supplies. Unsure if they ship over seas.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

35 posts in 151 days


#10 posted 71 days ago

Chapter 2. The materials. I had read up on just what was need. The articles on the net lists all the misc. tools needed, including something called a streamer which is a rod 21 inches long with a slot at one end, so I decided to order one. What a waste of money, esp for a small stool. Just not room to feed it over/under/over.

My previous job I bought a short needle, maybe 3inches long with split at the end and a little tip thing.
Open it, slip the end of the cane, clamp it shut with your fingers and you are on your way over/under/over.
Guess they don’t sell them any more. More later

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

35 posts in 151 days


#11 posted 71 days ago

Chapter 3. How to actually cane. Most of the info is right on the net. First part is easy,
pick the center of the front row, feed the cane up through the bottom, go clear to the back, down through the hole and up the next hole till you have done all the holes. Make sure to do this part leaving some slack. Step 2 Do the same thing again but this time leave more slack
and make sure the rows lay to the right.

Then the fun begins. Look at the pictures and instructions on the net’

If they are not clear don’t start, get some yarn or black thread and run a few rows using it. Lots easier than actually weaving and then undoing it all.

Last statement. For beginners, don’t think you can knock it all out in a short time.
I read somewhere that folks are paid 50 cents a hole. At rate I am going with 50 holes and then the binding phase
I am losing money,
BUT AS A PRESENT FOR MY BROTHER’s WIFE I WILL BE PAID WITH A PECAN PIE.
Can’t beat that.
The end

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1687 days


#12 posted 71 days ago

Thanks for all the info and sharing the thoughts and work,
The chaise are still in Paris…
So I might never get these done, but who knows, life is still so full of miracles.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View fernandoindia's profile

fernandoindia

1072 posts in 1541 days


#13 posted 71 days ago

Hi Mads.
I,ve been through the same process a couple of months ago. With 5 children you can imagine the caning holes of my chairs.

I bought a piece of Pre-woven Cane Webbing enough for 2 chairs, and it cost me equivalent to 70 euros. We are a very rich country, so we can afford such price :(.

Cleaning the groove where the spline will be inserted was the most difficult part. In my case, such spline was glued, and brad nailed in some places. Well that part was a pain. I left the cane webbing submerged in water during one night, and after installed on the chair hammering with 4 pieces of wood in opposite directions, so as to present the webbing correctly. Thereafter splined it. All the oral directions were given by the webbing vendor. And frankly I found this part quite easy. For an experienced architect, this should be a piece of cake.

The best

-- Back home. Fernando

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1687 days


#14 posted 68 days ago

Smiles. ;-)

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7230 posts in 2245 days


#15 posted 68 days ago

I’ve routed grooves in old cane chairs over the holes to accept
splines. It’s way easier to replace the cane with pre-woven cane.

Whether this is appropriate depends on the value and condition
of the chair.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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