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Which jigsaw would you go for...

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Forum topic by Lodewijk posted 01-21-2017 08:50 PM 591 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lodewijk

5 posts in 331 days


01-21-2017 08:50 PM

Buying my first jigsaw, I need to figure out which to go for.

I am looking at the following:

Bosch GST150BCE
Bosch GST160BCE
Bosch 18V LI B
Makita DJV182ZK

I should probably say that I already own an 18V Bosch cordless drill, so batteries would fit the 18V LI B.
Also, I know that one should decide between corded and cordless, but that for me is part of the question.

I would be mainly cutting hardwood, say oak, teak etc up to maybe 2”. I would want something strong enough that I don’t need to battle if I do need to cut something thicker. Also, when I start working, I hate waiting for electric motors to cool down so I can continue. I probably wont ever cut anything over 4”, that to me seems really thick. Cordless is of course very convenient, but are they really strong enough to slice through 2 or 3 inch teak without any hassle?

I wonder also why, at least around our part of the world, the Makita sells at such a premium. Its almost double the price of the 18V LI B, and about the same as the GST160BCE.

I would really appreciate any thoughts on this

-- Lodewijk, South Africa


6 replies so far

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 757 days


#1 posted 01-22-2017 02:05 AM

Lodewijk,

I cannot advise which jigsaw best meets your requirements. But I can say that I frequently wished my jig saw would send puffs of air downward to clear away saw dust from the cut line. Both my corded and cordless jig saws do not offer this feature so I end up blowing saw dust away from the cut line as the jigsaw makes its way through the cut.

I find for most cuts, the cordless jigsaw worked fine for me cutting ¾”thick hardwood. However if it is a long cut, changing batteries is usually required so I use the corded jigsaw for these long cuts. My cordless jigsaw seems to pull a lot of electricity from the battery. Therefore, if you anticipate frequently making long cuts or cuts through thick stock then the corded jigsaw may be the better option. While the convenience of the cordless models is hard to beat, changing batteries in the middle of cut is not very productive. If you elect a cordless jigsaw, then based on my experience having a spare fully charged battery at the ready saves some time otherwise wasted while waiting for the single battery to recharge.

My older corded jigsaw requires a wrench to change blades while the newer cordless jigsaw requires no tools for a blade change. As you may guess my preference is for a tool-less blade change. I suspect this feature has become standard.

I find that with both my cordless or corded jigsaw result in cuts that frequently ended up beveled. Slowing the feed rate helped some as did a sharp blade. A jigsaw that offers features to ensure a square cut is a saw, that if available, I would seriously consider. However, I am not sure that such a feature is offered on jigsaws. I tired of this beveling phenomenon so I finally bought a bandsaw.

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

447 posts in 1113 days


#2 posted 01-22-2017 04:46 AM

I bought a bosch a couple years ago, not sure what no. It is. The saw has the dust blower built in it and I guess it’s decent. As for the saw I’d definitely buy it again. Bosch makes very good tools. I would stay away from cordless, cutting the 2 and 3 in. Material will wear a battery down fast.
Gerald

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 739 days


#3 posted 01-22-2017 04:48 AM

get the best bosch you can afford, that is all i know about jigsaws.

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runswithscissors

2562 posts in 1862 days


#4 posted 01-22-2017 05:00 AM

The Bosch corded jigsaw does have toolless blade change, which is definitely a plus. But I have always found that a jigsaw is a poor choice (unless you have no alternative) for cutting thick material. The problem is that the longer the blade, the more it wants to flop around. Only a bandsaw, with blade guided both above and below the work, handles thick stuff easily. Even then, with improper blade tension it is possible to get bowed cuts.

The best one I ever saw for thick stuff was the old Wen Allsaw. The blades are a special shank, that you can make by simply grinding down reciprocating saw blades. Easily done. I had one of these (used) 50 years ago, and it was a real workhorse. When the armature burned up, a new one from their service center in Seattle cost something like $10. But Wen fell into the hands of bean counters, and the aluminum bodies became plastic, and everything they made after that was junk. They seem to be attempting a comeback, but I can’t speak to the quality of any of their current tools.

I did find a well-used one not long ago at my local ReStore, and bought it for nostalgia’s sake. If you could find a used one in decent shape (they do kick around in second hand stores, etc.) it might serve your needs.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#5 posted 01-22-2017 05:27 AM



The Bosch corded jigsaw does have toolless blade change, which is definitely a plus. But I have always found that a jigsaw is a poor choice (unless you have no alternative) for cutting thick material. The problem is that the longer the blade, the more it wants to flop around. Only a bandsaw, with blade guided both above and below the work, handles thick stuff easily. Even then, with improper blade tension it is possible to get bowed cuts.

A Mafell jigsaw with a CUnex blade will change your opinion but it is out of the OP’s budget based on the saws listed.

I am guessing based on model numbers the OP is not in the US, AFAIK the GST160 is the same as the US 572. If so the 572 is an excellent saw the equal or better of the Festool Carvex and the only other one I really like in that price range is the Metabo 140 but they don’t import the barrel handle to the US but are available elsewhere.

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JRsgarage

227 posts in 346 days


#6 posted 01-22-2017 04:23 PM

i don’t have any of the choices op mentioned but i do have a bosch js365. i’ve only used it on couple projects but it did what i expected..decent job. the toolless blade change is convenient.

-- Two is One, One is None

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