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Gluing down Ipe decking?

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Forum topic by jbay posted 01-20-2017 09:45 PM 1059 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jbay

2663 posts in 1041 days


01-20-2017 09:45 PM

I have a contractor that wants to glue down Ipe decking over linoleum.
First I understand that this isn’t ideal.
The deck is going over a garage/carport that is waterproofed and has a layer of linoleum on top of it. He doesn’t want to jeopardize the waterproofing by pulling up the linoleum or screwing into it. Question:
Is there an adhesive that would work for this?
Or is this just a bad idea period.


22 replies so far

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

920 posts in 3225 days


#1 posted 01-20-2017 10:42 PM


Question:
Is there an adhesive that would work for this?
Or is this just a bad idea period.
- jbay

I’ve tried gluing Ipe on two different occasions(jobs), with probably 8 different types of adhesives, in multiple different manners. Every one was a complete failure.
I had done a significant amount of ‘googlin’ on the matter before and after, and there are a few success stories out there. They weren’t doing anything different than what we had tried. Different subspecies maybe? Not as oily? no idea.
I won’t even quote a job anymore that involves Ipe and glue. Not worth the headache.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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jbay

2663 posts in 1041 days


#2 posted 01-20-2017 11:11 PM

Thanks Tony,

I’ll mark it as a bad idea period!

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bobasaurus

3531 posts in 3326 days


#3 posted 01-20-2017 11:33 PM

Ipe is very very oily. Maybe acetone wipe several times to remove the surface oil before gluing? A mechanical connection would be much much better, though. Maybe lay joists across, screwing them to the edges of the garage frame?

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

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jbay

2663 posts in 1041 days


#4 posted 01-21-2017 01:04 AM

Thanks Bobasaurus, that might be a solution.

Tony, Thinking out loud, Did you try contact cement for any of your trials?

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Tony_S

920 posts in 3225 days


#5 posted 01-21-2017 11:27 AM

No. It wasn’t even a consideration.
It’s(IME) just not strong enough for any of the solid lumber applications we use, Ipe or otherwise.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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a1Jim

117232 posts in 3719 days


#6 posted 01-21-2017 02:12 PM

Hey J
I think he needs to change his approach and use screwed down battens and screw to the decking to them. linoleum is not rated for outdoor use with hot and cold weather conditions ,he should use a self-sealing product like water and ice,when screwing the battens down the water and ice seals around the penetration, I alway overkill it by putting some Henry’s roof patch under each batten too. No problems after 30 years of deck building.

https://foursevenfive.com/sealing-screws-nails-under-roof-wall-battens-tescon-naidec-to-the-rescue/

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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diverlloyd

3105 posts in 1999 days


#7 posted 01-21-2017 02:38 PM

I second jims recomendation

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jbay

2663 posts in 1041 days


#8 posted 01-21-2017 03:56 PM

Thanks Tony, I appreciate the input.
Jim, Thanks

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MrRon

5085 posts in 3386 days


#9 posted 01-22-2017 02:12 AM

Being that it’s an outdoor deck, I would not consider an adhesive of any kind. I would rip up the linoleum and put down 15# roofing felt; then sleepers with the IPE screwed down.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1366 posts in 1062 days


#10 posted 01-22-2017 03:23 PM

Jbay,

I am a little confused. It sounds as if the deck is under construction or yet to be built. But linoleum is used evidently as waterproofing. If this is new construction, there are probably much better products for waterproofing a flat roof than kitchen flooring.

In any event, I agree with the contractor. As soon as the waterproof barrier is pierced by a fastener, a potential for a leak exists. Avoiding a hundred piercings of the roof is probably a good idea. Gluing the Ipe to deck surface would keep the wood in intimate contact with the deck and invite rot, even in a rot resistant wood. Also, when it is time to replace the roofing material or if a leak must be repaired, a lot of expensive wood could be destroyed.

I wonder why the decking is not floated on the deck. Snap-lock wood decking squares are commercially available and offer provisions for water to move under the decking. The alternative would be to fabricate Ipe panels with provisions that keep the Ipe elevated a bit off the deck. The panels can then be laid on the deck with no fasteners.

The link is to one vendor offering 24” x 24” Ipe decking squares. There are others…

https://buyhardwood.advantagelumber.com/p-1588-ipe-decking-smooth-tiles-24-x-24.aspx?gclid=COKG47KG1tECFdi6wAodOLUANg

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a1Jim

117232 posts in 3719 days


#11 posted 01-22-2017 03:50 PM

Sorry to say It really sounds like this is not this contractor’s area of expertise or he just calls himself a contractor given he’s trying to use strange products like linoleum outdoors plus it’s a linseed oil product which could be highly flammable in the right conditions. Don’t know if you used IPE before J but I dought it would rot it’s a very durable dense wood that’s even fire rated the same as masonry products.

I’ve seen Ipe tiles on “this old house” it looks like a good product but spendy but most Ipe items are not cheep.

This is the material used in many areas that’s used when there’s going to be penetrations through it, unlike roofing felt it seals around screws and nails.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Grace-Ice-Water-Shield-36-in-x-75-ft-225-sq-ft-Roll-Roofing-Underlayment-in-Black-5003002/202088840?cm_mmc=Shopping%7cTHD%7cG%7c0%7cG-BASE-PLA-D22-Roofing%7c&gclid=Cj0KEQiAzZHEBRD0ivi9_pDzgYMBEiQAtvxt-NGkEy7xicZhA3hVVD74B9yq5hOL6Kdy7MHf3AVoZJsaAr6I8P8HAQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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jbay

2663 posts in 1041 days


#12 posted 01-22-2017 04:42 PM

JBrow, Thanks
This is something that is existing. I haven’t seen it myself so I can’t really comment on exactly what is there.
He just told me that it would be going over linoleum. Personally, I have never seen linoleum used on a roof, but like I said, I haven’t seen it so I can’t really comment.

Jim,
He’s not so much a full pledged “contractor” as much as he is the right hand man for the company he works for.
I only used the word contractor for easier communication. He has superintended many commercial builds but decking is not his field of expertise for sure.
I wouldn’t read so much into it, he is basically just doing his due diligence to be sure he does it right and doesn’t end up with a failure. He has never used the material before.
All he did was basically asked me if you can glue it down.
Thanks for the link, I told him about it, he knows, he’s used it before.

He does know a lot about construction, he’s built 3 cabins in Utah that I know of.
(He didn’t use Ipe for the decks)

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a1Jim

117232 posts in 3719 days


#13 posted 01-22-2017 04:57 PM

J Sometimes it’s best to recommend to your employer to sub a job out, rather than have it fail, that won’t help your relationship with your employer .There’s no shame in saying you don’t know something, we all have things we excel at and things we are not so good at. As an employer myself I’d much rather have an employee tell me they haven’t done something than to take a project on trying to fake their way through it only to screw up and waste time and material.
It’s nice of you to try and help your friend out.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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jbay

2663 posts in 1041 days


#14 posted 01-22-2017 05:06 PM

Jim, it’s not like that. He’s been doing stuff for the man for over 20 years. He’ll get it done, and he will make sure it’s right. Like I said, he was just asking the simple question.
If he has to put down battens and water and ice, he will.
He won’t be faking his way through, he’s from the

“get it done gang” lol

I do appreciate your help!

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a1Jim

117232 posts in 3719 days


#15 posted 01-22-2017 05:17 PM

Ha ha
I know what you mean 30 years ago being 40 years old trying to find employment in a new state, I decided my best bet was to become a contractor even though I’d only had remodeling experience in my own home repair and a commercial property I owned,so every job I took my wife would say have done this before and I’d say no but there’s a book out there, much to her shock and fear, I would say I can find out how to do it.
So I guess I shouldn’t be so self-righteous about faking your way through a job LOL

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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