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Forum topic by them700project posted 01-20-2017 09:17 PM 561 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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them700project

115 posts in 1013 days


01-20-2017 09:17 PM

New to woodworking and very new to hand tools, I have a few new tools including 3 new veritas saws(carcass,dovetail,tenening) 2 new planes(#5 LA jackplane, and LA Block plane), and a set of Veritas bench chisels. I went with PM-v11 on planes and chisels. Is there anything That I should be doing before putting these tools to work such as sharpening my steal or setting the saw? All I have found on the subject is how to do these things but is it recommended before starting or once they are dull?


14 replies so far

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jmartel

7882 posts in 2145 days


#1 posted 01-20-2017 09:25 PM

The plane blades and chisels are normally honed first, but they should be already sharpened decently from the factory. Should only need a higher grit stone to start with.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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JayT

5623 posts in 2206 days


#2 posted 01-20-2017 09:40 PM

Saws will be ready to go out of the box, planes and chisels should be honed before use. As jmartel said, a high grit stone and/or strop is probably all that’s needed to get started. If you keep them sharp with periodic touch-ups and don’t get nicks, then that will be enough for quite a bit of use.

My planes and chisels rarely hit anything other than my finest stone (a Super-Fine EZ Lap Diamond Plate) and a strop.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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them700project

115 posts in 1013 days


#3 posted 01-20-2017 10:22 PM

will a dmt duosharp extra fine be ok to start? or start with aluminum oxide films?

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buckbuster31

248 posts in 510 days


#4 posted 01-20-2017 10:27 PM

for not much experience you started out strong! good tools, sir

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JayT

5623 posts in 2206 days


#5 posted 01-20-2017 10:28 PM

The Duosharp extra-fine is very similar in grit to my EZ Lap, so will be fine. I’d just do a few passes on that, check to make sure that everything is looking good and then proceed up to a higher grit to finish. I don’t consider the 1200 grit diamond plates to be quite fine enough for a truly sharp edge. I like to follow up with a strop, others use diamond film or a very high grit waterstone. All work just fine.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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them700project

115 posts in 1013 days


#6 posted 01-20-2017 10:29 PM

I figured it would save me money in the long run. Theoretically anyways

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them700project

115 posts in 1013 days


#7 posted 01-20-2017 10:29 PM

Thanks for the help guys

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JayT

5623 posts in 2206 days


#8 posted 01-20-2017 10:30 PM



I figured it would save me money in the long run. Theoretically anyways

- them700project

That’s good thinking. Buy well and buy once is usually the best plan in the long term.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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jmartel

7882 posts in 2145 days


#9 posted 01-20-2017 10:57 PM

For honing you really want something like a 6000 grit water stone or finer. I finish up on a 13000 grit stone, typically.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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them700project

115 posts in 1013 days


#10 posted 01-20-2017 11:03 PM

I have 4 duosharps, films down to .3 micron and a strop. Im going to play around tomorrow. I grabbed a cheep chisel to start with

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bobasaurus

3443 posts in 3179 days


#11 posted 01-20-2017 11:40 PM

The 0.3 micron film will likely do better than the strop. Be careful not to cut into it, though. I stuck mine to MDF but wish I had gone with float glass or granite.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

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waho6o9

8188 posts in 2572 days


#12 posted 01-21-2017 12:08 AM

You’re wise to purchase quality, congrats!

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Rich

2809 posts in 584 days


#13 posted 01-21-2017 12:33 AM



You re wise to purchase quality, congrats!

- waho6o9

Exactly. If you were asking about how to set up your Buck Bros. chisels and planes, it would be a much different story.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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OSU55

1666 posts in 1984 days


#14 posted 01-24-2017 05:37 PM

I use duosharps up to 25um, then use mylar film in 30, 12, 3, and 0.3um using microbevels to reduce time. Here’s a description. The film on glass is flatter than the stones and doesn’t need dressed/flattened. I go this fine for a smoothing plane blade. Blades for other uses don’t need quite the polish. A jack plane blade could probable stop at 25um (used for rough jack plane work).

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