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Finishing a Barn Wood Table

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Forum topic by Jsbeckton posted 01-19-2017 03:41 PM 358 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jsbeckton

10 posts in 328 days


01-19-2017 03:41 PM

I’ve purchased some old rustic rough sawn barnwood, denailed (with detector) and treated it with borax. It’s currently stickered inside my house until it reaches 5-6% MC.

My question has to do with planing and finishing once it’s there. It’s currently about 2” thick but I want to plane it does to about 1.5” but without losing all of the rough sawn character. I had planned to take most of that 1/2” off just the bottom and only plane the top just enough to get it fairly flat, maybe do this with sanding alone on that side. However I read somewhere that it’s best to take equal parts off each side when planing. Is this absolutely necessary or can I just plane one side?


9 replies so far

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#1 posted 01-19-2017 05:28 PM

Just plane one side and clamp them to a flat surface until you are ready to assemble and install.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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bigblockyeti

4697 posts in 1556 days


#2 posted 01-19-2017 05:44 PM

I would resaw the back (opposite the side you want to keep) off to the width you’re looking for after letting it dry to the desired MC then take a light pass on the jointer or with a hand plane to remove the saw marks you created.

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Jsbeckton

10 posts in 328 days


#3 posted 01-19-2017 06:31 PM

I should mention that I don’t have anything to resaw these 8” boards. Would planing really be that much different or just take more time?

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#4 posted 01-19-2017 06:39 PM

That’s what I assumed. No, no difference. The reason they say do both side is because the fresh side has a tendency to have more moisture and as it dries, it may cause warping or cupping; thus if you clamp them to a flat surface, it will prevent that. You can stack them with no stickers alternating the fresh side of one board with the rough side of the next and clamp them all together.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Jsbeckton

10 posts in 328 days


#5 posted 01-19-2017 10:23 PM

Ok, if I wait until they are 5-6% MC will they still tend to move like that?

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 737 days


#6 posted 01-19-2017 10:34 PM

Waiting for wood to hit 5-6 percent is something that would never happen in my region. Relative humidity is a big factor when calculating moisture content.

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Jsbeckton

10 posts in 328 days


#7 posted 01-20-2017 12:56 AM

Another issue I have just discovered is that a few of my boards are not oak but I don’t know what they are. Will this be a problem if I don’t mind the look? They weigh about the same but the non-oak boards have a very smooth tight grain. Any idea what it is? It’s the one on the right.

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Jsbeckton

10 posts in 328 days


#8 posted 01-20-2017 12:58 AM

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Jsbeckton

10 posts in 328 days


#9 posted 01-20-2017 02:16 AM

Hickory?

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