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Forum topic by Mainiac Matt posted 01-18-2017 12:45 AM 667 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mainiac Matt

8345 posts in 2446 days


01-18-2017 12:45 AM

The Amana AGM raised panel set I’m using has a back cutter and came set up with a large bearing.

Everything turned out great, but I did think that the depth of the Ogee wasn’t quite what I thought it should be and the panels don’t drop into the styles very far.

The instructions that came with the set seemed great, but did not include any illustrations or reference to the back cutter feature. So I used the bits as they came set up from the factory…...... WRONG!!!!

So I go to Amana’s web site tonight and find a brochure for the raised panel set with the back cutter and it turns out that there’s a smaller bearing that came with the set, which I should have used.


Bad news… I’ve finish sanded and sealed three of the six panels already…

Good news… The router table is still set up at exactly the correct height, so I can swap the bearings and cut the deeper Ogee.

Bad news… In order to prevent tearing out the trailing edge when routing the end grain, I backed up the panel with a piece of scrap and I cut both end grain ends first before cutting the long grain….

BUT HOW CAN I BACK UP THE END GRAIN CUTS AND PREVENT TEAR OUT NOW THAT I’VE ALREADY ROUTED ALL FOUR SIDES?

Needless to say, I’m pretty frustrated and do not want to lose these panels or have ugly tear out on each one.

Any ideas?

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam


6 replies so far

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Mainiac Matt

8345 posts in 2446 days


#1 posted 01-18-2017 12:51 AM

All I can think of is to borrow a contour transfer tool from work…

transfer the existing Ogee contour onto a scrap block as best as I can, cut the contour on the band saw and then use that scrap block to back up the end grain cuts.

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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boxcarmarty

16531 posts in 2477 days


#2 posted 01-18-2017 01:02 AM

Matt, you should be able to do another deeper pass using the smaller bearing just the same as you would any multiple pass using a large bit. You are still cutting all 4 sides of the panel which would take care of any tear-out from the previous side…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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Rich

3531 posts in 707 days


#3 posted 01-18-2017 01:02 AM

Not sure what to tell you about the ones that are finished. You’ll probably have to go back and refinish those surfaces that get cut with the new setup. As far as a backer board goes, I never use one on raised panels. If you start with the cross grain cut (which you always should with any profile), any tear out will be removed by the long grain cut. Give it a try on some scrap and see.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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runswithscissors

2818 posts in 2142 days


#4 posted 01-18-2017 01:45 AM

Doesn’t answer your question, but I wonder why we need back cutters since most of us now have planers that easily make 5/8” thick panels. The only reason I can think of is if you must use 3/4” material. I don’t prefer the appearance of panels that have the back cutter cove, though tastes may vary, of course.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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boxcarmarty

16531 posts in 2477 days


#5 posted 01-18-2017 02:04 AM

Back cutters are for when you want the raised panel appearance on both the inside and out…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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bigJohninvegas

484 posts in 1579 days


#6 posted 01-18-2017 02:37 AM

Rich is right, do the end grain pass first. Should be fine.

-- John

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