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Forum topic by Andybb posted 01-17-2017 09:08 PM 1834 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


01-17-2017 09:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veneer band-saw resaw

I’ve seen it done both ways by lots of people who are supposed to know what they are doing…. Do I want the veneer on the outside (right side) of the blade or up against the re-saw fence.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!


17 replies so far

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Bill White

4808 posts in 3801 days


#1 posted 01-17-2017 09:17 PM

I cut inside the fence.
Big thing is not to use a blade that is too big in width for your saw.
Biggest I use is a 1/2” blade with 3 tpi. My saw is a Grizz 0555LX.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#2 posted 01-17-2017 09:32 PM

Thank you. Trying to make final adjustments to get a good quality veneer. I’ve been thinking that my 3/4” is a little too heavy for the job on my 14” bandsaw. Seems like it wants more speed and horse power. Gonna try my 5/8” 3 tpi.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View joey502's profile

joey502

510 posts in 1358 days


#3 posted 01-17-2017 11:33 PM

I would use a 1/2” 3 tpi blade on a 14” saw to resaw boards. 3/4” and maybe even 5/8” is a little much for a small saw. If the saw is set up correctly a 1/2 will give you nice results. Super sharp new blade if possible.

I keep the piece i intend to use between the blade and fence. I take off my rip fence and use a more solid shop built fence when resawing. The homemade fence can be clamped on the front and back of the table, i like the rigidity when resawing.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1987 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 01-18-2017 01:28 AM

Agree with Joey and Bill. I setup between the fence and the blade. If you’re making multiple slices, there’s nothing to change between passes. I found that blade tension is a big factor. I crank mine down very tight — even more than for standard cutting — to ensure it doesn’t get curved by the grain and make a cup in one of the boards.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#5 posted 01-18-2017 04:00 AM

Thanks. Another question…how about fpm speed and horse power. Should I consider a little more HP and a different pulley size?


Agree with Joey and Bill. I setup between the fence and the blade. If you re making multiple slices, there s nothing to change between passes. I found that blade tension is a big factor. I crank mine down very tight — even more than for standard cutting — to ensure it doesn t get curved by the grain and make a cup in one of the boards.

- RichTaylor


How does that compare with the “low tension” resaw blades on the market?

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Rich

1987 posts in 430 days


#6 posted 01-18-2017 05:05 AM

I like the idea of the low tension blade, Andy. I have a classic band saw made by the Atlas Press Co in Kalamazoo in the early ‘50s. It was the first power tool my dad let me use when I was maybe eight. I have it tuned beautifully, but it uses an 82 inch blade, and I don’t see those blades in that length.

Ever since I watched a Dave Marks video where he toured his shop and showed a bandsaw that he added an extension to the height to take it from a 6 inch to a 12 inch resaw capacity, I’ve been intrigued with the idea of doing that with mine. A 5-3/4 inch extension post would take it to 93-1/2 blade capacity and almost 12 inch resaw height. That 93-1/2 inch low tension blade I saw on Amazon might be just what pushes me over the edge.

I did up the motor to a 3/4 horse Dayton that was still in the box from maybe 40 years ago. That made a huge difference.. I didn’t mess around with FPM.

So, no, I can’t answer your question about the low tension blade, but your thread may have led me on a new journey. Thank you.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#7 posted 01-18-2017 08:34 AM

I think I now have a plan. I have a 3/4” low tension (Amazon) blade that I was trying to use for resawing. It worked fine on less dense wood as did the half inch regular tension blade. But on a 4×4” hunk-a-figured maple this thread has made me realize it’s probably too much to ask of a 14” Harbor Freight saw which works great otherwise. So, half inch it is. I think I mistakenly figured, “more blade = more cutting power”.

You may have to manufacture a 5 3/4 block but sounds like a plan especially since it’ll allow you to buy standard length blades. When u get your riser pay very close attention to try and duplicate the exact alignment of the wheels / half’s of the saw albeit 5 3/4” higher. Be patient dialing it in.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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shipwright

7783 posts in 2638 days


#8 posted 01-18-2017 02:45 PM

Just so you have an opinion on the other side of the fence…..
Do what works best for you but I prefer to cut veneer on the outside of the fence. If the fence is set to the drift of the blade accurately and you are getting uniform pieces, then cutting outside the blade with a thickness gauge allows you to keep a smooth, finished edge against the fence. I makes it harder to compound what may be a very tiny error in each cut.
It is harder to set up but I think it is worth the effort especially if you are cutting expensive hardwood and you don’t want to waste any more then necessary.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1706 posts in 1063 days


#9 posted 01-18-2017 03:28 PM

“Low tension” usually just means the blade is thin (a good thing for many applications). Typically a blade is tensioned to a comfortable amount below the yield strength of the steel which is directly related to the blades cross section. A thinner blade reaches this point at a lower tension then a “standard” blade which is great for saws that don’t have the higher strength in their design. Less steel means the blade will deflect more, but careful setup and slow feed can eliminate any disadvantage plus the saw has to work less when sawing, just like a thin kerf blade on a TS.

Make sure your blade is square to your table and then check your fence against the table. Be aware that if you guide column is not also square, the blade can be deflected by the guides as you raise/lower the column. Having the column square means you don’t need to adjust your guide blocks/bearings every time you raise/lower the column.

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rwe2156

2719 posts in 1321 days


#10 posted 01-18-2017 03:38 PM

I cut to the inside and rejoint each time.

That being said, what Paul said has some validity because I have messed up more than one veneer process due to multiplying an error through successive cuts.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#11 posted 01-18-2017 09:09 PM

Great. My previous re-saw experience has been with 4/4+ to make 3/4” & 1/2” etc stock, not veneer. But veneering is a much more exacting process. For some reason I have always liked the “keeper piece” on the outside. It seemed to me that there was less pressure on the blade that way. and not having to re-joint every time seems as if it would save time and waste. I use a thickness gauge on my TS to get repeatable cuts and it works great.

This all started because of a finishing question on a frame project with commercial veneer with some input from Paul among others, http://lumberjocks.com/topics/195938 then realizing how superior home cut veneer would look, http://lumberjocks.com/topics/198458 thus my quest for a better technique. I have been able to get a decent thin slice, I just wasn’t able to do it on really dense stock. So this thread has caused me to go back to the start of the process to get a better product to then apply the finish to. Kinda like making sure the foundation is level and square before building the house.

PS – I love this site. It’s like standing in a virtual workshop and you guys keep sticking your heads in and giving expert advice.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#12 posted 01-18-2017 11:13 PM

One last (I hope) question. Since “low tension” seems to be relative/subjective, what is a good guide? I’m not spending $300 on a tension guage and the DIY ones on utube seem unreliable and the fact that my saw has no guide #’s for tension on it does this work, The Thien Audible Tension Gauge for Bandsaws http://www.jpthien.com/tg.htm. or is the flutter test just as good?

Like I said, I’m going to make sure I try and kill any snakes before trying to cut the veneer.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7783 posts in 2638 days


#13 posted 01-19-2017 12:00 AM

Get a good blade and a variety of not too expensive woods and start trying all the different ways suggested by all the different people. We all have our skill levels, tool qualities, and ways of attacking problems. Different methods work for different people.
Listen to everyone’s advice and then experiment until you find “your way”.
BTW, I use the flutter test and a somewhat experienced eye.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MrUnix

6021 posts in 2039 days


#14 posted 01-19-2017 12:08 AM

Flutter test and ‘ping’ with a finger, same as I do on the scroll saw. You will get a feel for what is the correct tension pretty quickly. I also re-saw on the outside like Paul… using a homemade thin rip jig:

Which also works great on the table saw for cutting thin strips for inlay and stuff.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#15 posted 01-19-2017 01:28 AM

I think a switch from a bolt head to a bearing will upgrade my TS thin rip jig. A buddy of mine swears by the Woodslicer blades. I saw a pretty “skeptically convincing” youtube vid for it here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d29Tg6WPKUo The difference was dramatic but like I said, I’m skeptical. Think I’ll order one but grab a Timberwolf or Olson from my local Rockler store to practice with whilst I perfect my technique and await it’s arrival. I figure the practice blade will be dull by the time I finish butchering the practice wood for a week or so.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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