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squaring my square

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Forum topic by Carol posted 01-17-2017 03:57 PM 1028 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carol

57 posts in 348 days


01-17-2017 03:57 PM

this is so aggravating! took my combo square down off the rack, squaring up the end of a piece of wood that i’d sworn i cut square. hm, it’s not…dang it!
used the square on the factory edge of new plywood. wow, my plywood’s not square either?? hold the phone!
ran a line up the ruler, flipped it over and ran another line. the square’s not square!
took an hour to square the square by filing the little nubs the ruler rides on. NOW it’s square but i don’t dare loosen the screw and move the ruler…
do all squares need adjusting right from the box? is one square “better” than another? recommendations? one true square is great, but i need at least 1 more, and a combo square doesn’t always do what i want

-- Carol


12 replies so far

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10610 posts in 2215 days


#1 posted 01-17-2017 05:48 PM

Throw it away and buy a PEC blem from Taylor Tools. Seriously. You can fix them temporarily but it will not stay and will be an ongoing aggravation. I tossed all mine last year and bought a Blue Point, also recently bought a Brown and Sharpe, both dead nutz out of the package.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#2 posted 01-17-2017 05:54 PM

Rick is right. There is some real junk out there. Maybe OK for rough work where it gets knocked around, but you’re obviously looking for accuracy. My choice is the PEC as well. Just as smooth and accurate as a Starrett for about half the price.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8027 posts in 2411 days


#3 posted 01-17-2017 05:58 PM

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#4 posted 01-17-2017 06:01 PM

Rick’s right^. Definitely a difference between a good combo square and a not good one. In addition the the PEC and Brown and Sharpe Rick mention, Starrett and Mitutoyo are good brands. For the best value, the PEC seconds are truly a great buy. If cost is not a concern, I’d go with Starrett.

In general, you want a hardened rule that is machined, not stamped and a hardened steel or cast iron head. Cast iron is fine for wood and occasional use on soft metals. If you use it regularly on metal, get the hardened one. You don’t need any portion of the square to be Aluminum. Ever.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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BrettLuna

43 posts in 397 days


#5 posted 01-17-2017 06:23 PM

I bit the bullet and went with Starrett combination squares a few years ago…4”, 6”, and the 12” set. I hadn’t yet heard of PEC at that time. If had it to do over, I might still wind up with Starrett but I’d sure give PEC a long hard look.

-- Brett — Peters Creek, Alaska

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#6 posted 01-17-2017 06:29 PM

not to be bumb but what is the big difference between a combination square and a tri square, I don’t see the [point. I have both but never use the combination.

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Rick_M

10610 posts in 2215 days


#7 posted 01-17-2017 06:52 PM

It’s try square, as in tried and true. I have several but never use them. A combination square can be used for other things like 45s or as a depth guage.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#8 posted 01-17-2017 07:03 PM

Don’t forget double squares, which excel in places that combination squares don’t. They all serve a purpose and boning up on what works best where is worth the effort.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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waho6o9

8027 posts in 2411 days


#9 posted 01-17-2017 07:05 PM

Double squares rock, good call

View Karda's profile

Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#10 posted 01-17-2017 07:09 PM

ok thanks

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#11 posted 01-17-2017 08:00 PM

Adjustable squares, combination or double, can be used to set distances, and measure depths/widths as well. I got by for years without a marking gauge using an adjustable square and an awl or marking knife.

FWIW, my try squares, or engineer’s squares, don’t get used for layout work. Only for setup and checking other tools for square. They live inside the house too instead of in the shop. If you don’t have at least one square you can count on to be absolutely square every time, you won’t ever be able to have full confidence that anything else is truly square either.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View bridgerberdel's profile

bridgerberdel

50 posts in 1077 days


#12 posted 03-02-2017 02:51 AM

For me it’s a constant battle. I pick up tools at thrift stores and junk shops if the price is right. I’m getting pretty good at truing up squares, but I have a drawer full that need some attention.

-- occasional musings on my blog: www.bridgerberdel.wordpress.com

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