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Anyone use a drill press as a drum sander or lathe?

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Forum topic by JCamp posted 01-17-2017 12:43 AM 644 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JCamp

639 posts in 577 days


01-17-2017 12:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: sander

I’m a pretty cheap guy. I don’t mind spending some money on something that I need and will use a lot for ever…..
Anyway.. there r times that it would b handy to hav a drum sander. The only time I ever used one was in shop class in highschool but that thing was awesome. I don’t hav much spare room in my shop for a dedicated drum sander nor do I wanna spend the money on one. I do however hav a older delta drill press that can go different speeds. It’s by no means a high dollar press but runs good an I already hav it and it doesn’t get used much.
Has anyone on here ever used one as a drum sander or even as a small lathe?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might


14 replies so far

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JCamp

639 posts in 577 days


#1 posted 01-17-2017 12:55 AM

Some people may call the sander that im thinking of a “spindle” sander but the teacher always called it a drum sander.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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TheFridge

9608 posts in 1513 days


#2 posted 01-17-2017 01:30 AM

Spindle sander yes. Lathe yes. Would only use it as a lathe sparingly. It’s a pain.

Never thought I’d use a lathe a lot until I got one. It’s indispensable.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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ColonelTravis

1802 posts in 1921 days


#3 posted 01-17-2017 01:50 AM

I don’t use a drill press as a sander because of the lateral pressure you put on the chuck. Spindle sanders were made for that work, drill presses were not.

I’m also a pretty cheap guy and since I don’t use a spindle sander a ton but wanted one because I knew it would be used every now and then, I bought a Wen on amazon for less than $100. Seems to be the identical one sold under other brands – Shop Fox, Triton, etc. In fact, I was at Rockler today and saw a Triton on sale for $150 and I looked at it up close and said to myself – there is nothing different about this from mine except the color. Had it for more than a year, so far so good.

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OSB

147 posts in 553 days


#4 posted 01-17-2017 01:59 AM

If you have a nice drill press with minimal play in the spindle, try not to use it for that because the lateral pressure may create more play.

If you have a drill press that is already a bit sloppy, go for it.

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Woodknack

11805 posts in 2407 days


#5 posted 01-17-2017 02:37 AM

Drill presses use radial bearings just like small to medium wood lathes, spindle sanders, roller skates, and many other things but the chuck will come loose when a side load is applied if you don’t support it from the bottom.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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unbob

810 posts in 1930 days


#6 posted 01-17-2017 03:16 AM

It was more common to use a drill press for sanding and even grinding on a few decades ago.
The older light duty 1/2” presses used the Jacobs locking collar chucks if they were intended to include such use, keeps the chuck from flying off the mounting taper, from side thrust.
The other style spindles that use a morse taper shank, are not considered safe for operations using side thrust,

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LittleShaver

327 posts in 646 days


#7 posted 01-17-2017 06:53 PM

I have done both using a second hand HF drill press. It worked, but I only did it once or twice a year. The old HF drill press has since been replaced, but using it as a lathe or spindle sander had nothing to do with it’s demise.

-- Sawdust Maker

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HokieKen

5273 posts in 1165 days


#8 posted 01-17-2017 08:08 PM

I use sanding drums in my DP occasionally. If I needed them often I’d get a dedicated spindle sander though.

The other style spindles that use a morse taper shank, are not considered safe for operations using side thrust,

- unbob

Woodturning lathes use MT mounts and are designed primarily for side thrust. Is there some other difference that makes one safe and not the other?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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JayT

5679 posts in 2238 days


#9 posted 01-17-2017 08:11 PM

I use sanding drums on my drill press and used it as a lathe several times before getting a real lathe. Worked OK, just a pain to turn vertically instead of horizontally. If I had more space, I’d invest in an oscillating spindle sander, but not going to happen with the current setup.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Bill White

4949 posts in 3987 days


#10 posted 01-17-2017 09:29 PM

Did it a few times. Bought the Ridgid. No more flyin’ chucks.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

639 posts in 577 days


#11 posted 01-17-2017 09:31 PM

Ok. Shoulf have said that either set up wouldn’t be used much. I’m currently working on a little shelf An thought that it would b handy to hav a sander around to do some sanding on the edges. An the only current use I hav for a lathe is that I need to make a new set of handles for some chisels and a new knob for a hand plane.
Could any of you folks that hav had, or currently hav a set up lik I’m thinking about share some pictures to give me an idea how to go about it?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

663 posts in 3348 days


#12 posted 01-17-2017 09:32 PM


Woodturning lathes use MT mounts and are designed primarily for side thrust. Is there some other difference that makes one safe and not the other?

- HokieKen

When you are using Morse tapers on a lathe you don’t have only side pressure you have pressure pushing into the taper to keep it seated as well. If for example a chuck used a taper and you tried to turn a bowl (without a center pushing into the bowl blank) you could easily unseat the chuck.

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HokieKen

5273 posts in 1165 days


#13 posted 01-17-2017 09:34 PM

Ahhh yes. Makes sense now that I think about it. Thanks!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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ralbuck

4586 posts in 2293 days


#14 posted 01-21-2017 09:32 PM

I did use my drill press for very small turning projects using files and sanding devices only, no chisels! It did work
But a H-F mini-lathe—(I paid $100) for mine with the coupon; does a lot better and easier job. Does not take a lot of room either. I Would NOT want to try big projects on it though. For the price it is a great tool.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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