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How thick for resaw to end up with 1/4" smooth finish?

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Forum topic by SJThrasher posted 01-16-2017 07:43 PM 1112 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SJThrasher

18 posts in 1125 days


01-16-2017 07:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw milling

I tried searching, but can’t narrow down what I need.

I have two slabs of wood I want to resaw down and end up with finished 1/4” thick pieces. I just purchased a 3/4” Timber Wolf blade (after adding the riser block to my Jet saw). I played with it over the weekend and really like the way it cuts. Obviously, I’ll have to run it through the planer and finish sand the pieces, but I don’t know how much I need to start with. Is there general rule for rough-cut thickness?


7 replies so far

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JayT

5453 posts in 2045 days


#1 posted 01-16-2017 07:49 PM

Don’t know about a general rule, but I add about 1/16 for each rough side to be safe. That might be a bit more than necessary, but gives enough to make sure of hitting the target thickness.

So for 1/4 final thickness, if one side is planed already, I’d cut at 5/16. If both sides are rough, then around 3/8.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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HorizontalMike

7655 posts in 2748 days


#2 posted 01-16-2017 08:01 PM



Don t know about a general rule, but I add about 1/16 for each rough side to be safe. That might be a bit more than necessary, but gives enough to make sure of hitting the target thickness.
So for 1/4 final thickness, if one side is planed already, I d cut at 5/16. If both sides are rough, then around 3/8.
- JayT

I agree with Jay. There is no hard and fast rule, as it all depends on how well your resawing goes. IMO, hardwood warps less when resawing. That does not mean cut it and forget it. It just means that you usually have a little more time to lay up your panels befroe things could go south. As for me, 3/8” sounds about right, and FWIW, I have managed to plane these panels (in Ash) down to just 0.20”, literally had my RIDGID planer bottoming out (max).

I would suggest stacking and weighting down after making a large amount, just to help keep them flat. If you will be building framed pahels, I would recommend using SpaceBalls to help center them in their frames.

Here are a couple examples from my projects:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/70869

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/61479

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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SJThrasher

18 posts in 1125 days


#3 posted 01-16-2017 08:11 PM

Thanks to you both. 3/8 is about what I was thinking. I’d rather have to plane it a bit more (and lose a little) than have it so thin it’s not usable. By the way, these slabs are only 18” long. One is Rose Wood that is actually three 1.5” slabs that were originally laminated together to make a decorative post. The other is Koa and is about 2.25 inches thick. I’ve had both for many years and am only now getting comfortable enough to cut them down for some box projects.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

683 posts in 650 days


#4 posted 01-17-2017 12:46 AM

I do a lot of resawing maple and walnut to 5/16 inch. I use it in making coasters with my CNC router. I have never been able to consistently cut and thickness sand to dimension without allowing 1/16 per rough side. In other words, my experience is just like JayT’s. I use a 3/4” woodslicer resaw blade on a Laguna model 14/12 band saw. I think next time I will go back to Timber Wolf or perhaps try a new brand. The woodslicers just don’t seem to last all that long.

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pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#5 posted 01-17-2017 01:31 AM

I would start with something around 7/8” thick. Sometimes 3/4” works to get two 1/4” veneers, and sometimes it doesn’t. There’s nothing more annoying that having two beautifully figured pieces of hardwood that are a hair too thin to use.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7655 posts in 2748 days


#6 posted 01-17-2017 01:28 PM



… I use a 3/4” woodslicer resaw blade on a Laguna model 14/12 band saw. I think next time I will go back to Timber Wolf or perhaps try a new brand. The woodslicers just don t seem to last all that long.
- ArtMann

I use a Timberwolf 3/4” 2-3TPI. The altering # of teeth really helps keep your cut clean of dust and results in a straighter cut IMO. Previously I used the TW 3/4” 3TPI. The 2-3 tooth set is a game changer.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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SJThrasher

18 posts in 1125 days


#7 posted 01-28-2017 12:15 AM

Sooo, I had a disappointing first run. Looking for some advice. I made it through one cut on the Rose wood. This is 10” high, by about 15” long. I cut one thin slice off where the original part split off. Right at the end, it started to smoke, and I mean the last 1/8”. Didn’t push any harder. Blade is toast. The blade itself never seems to get hot, but even after cleaning everything off, it still burns as soon as it touches the wood.

So, wrong blade? Too hard of wood? Did I push it too fast, I didn’t time it, but about 5 minutes to get through it. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

BTW, it is the 2/3 blade.

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